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Monday, November 3
 

9:00am

Charleston Seminar: Introduction to Data Curation
Sponsored by JoVE

Registration Required
: Certificate Option $250, Non-Certificate Option $200

Libraries and archives are increasingly responsible for curation of digital data. This includes not only acquiring and managing data but also engagement with data creators and facilitating new forms of research through data use. This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to the primary opportunities, challenges, principles and strategies for addressing data curation within the context of libraries and archives. It will be an interactive event, include a combination of lecture, discussion and practical exercises.

Continued on Tuesday, 11/3, from 9:00 am - 12:00 pm 

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Crabtree

Jonathan Crabtree

Assistant Director for Archives and Information Technology, Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Crabtree is Assistant Director for Cyberinfrastructure at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at UNC Chapel Hill. The institute’s social science data archive is one of the oldest and most extensive in the country. As assistant director, Crabtree completely revamped the institute’s technology infrastructure and has positioned the institute to assume a leading national role in information archiving. His current efforts include... Read More →
avatar for Christopher (Cal) Lee

Christopher (Cal) Lee

Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Christopher (Cal) Lee is Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He teaches archival administration; records management; digital curation; understanding information technology for managing digital collections; and digital forensics. He is a lead organizer and instructor for the DigCCurr Professional Institute, and he teaches professional workshops on digital forensics methods... Read More →


Monday November 3, 2014 9:00am - 4:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403
 
Tuesday, November 4
 

9:00am

Charleston Seminar: Introduction to Data Curation
Sponsored by JoVE

Continued from Monday, 11/3

Registration Required - Certificate Option $250, Non-Certificate Option $200

Libraries and archives are increasingly responsible for curation of digital data. This includes not only acquiring and managing data but also engagement with data creators and facilitating new forms of research through data use. This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to the primary opportunities, challenges, principles and strategies for addressing data curation within the context of libraries and archives. It will be an interactive event, include a combination of lecture, discussion and practical exercises.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Crabtree

Jonathan Crabtree

Assistant Director for Archives and Information Technology, Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Crabtree is Assistant Director for Cyberinfrastructure at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at UNC Chapel Hill. The institute’s social science data archive is one of the oldest and most extensive in the country. As assistant director, Crabtree completely revamped the institute’s technology infrastructure and has positioned the institute to assume a leading national role in information archiving. His current efforts include... Read More →
avatar for Christopher (Cal) Lee

Christopher (Cal) Lee

Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Christopher (Cal) Lee is Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He teaches archival administration; records management; digital curation; understanding information technology for managing digital collections; and digital forensics. He is a lead organizer and instructor for the DigCCurr Professional Institute, and he teaches professional workshops on digital forensics methods... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:00pm

Civil War/Slavery Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

All tours are $20 per person.  Reservations may be made on tour website broadstreettours.com and will be confirmed by e-mail. Number of participants limited to 20.  Room permitting, reservations will be accepted the week of the conference.  Payment by cash or check will be collected at time of tour. (Please make checks to Carol Ezell-Gilson or Lee Ann Bain.) 

Tour will begin and end at Washington Park, on the northeast corner of Broad and Meeting.  (Washington Park is approximately 1 mile from the Francis Marion Hotel.) A minimum of 6 people needed for tour to go.  For more information or questions, call Carol (843) 478-8414 or Lee Ann (843) 822-5248.

Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Washington Park Northeast corner of Broad and Meeting Streets

3:00pm

General History: Charleston Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

All tours are $20 per person.  Reservations may be made on tour website broadstreettours.com and will be confirmed by e-mail. Number of participants limited to 20.  Room permitting, reservations will be accepted the week of the conference.  Payment by cash or check will be collected at time of tour. (Please make checks to Carol Ezell-Gilson or Lee Ann Bain.) 

Tour will begin and end at Washington Park, on the northeast corner of Broad and Meeting.  (Washington Park is approximately 1 mile from the Francis Marion Hotel.) A minimum of 6 people needed for tour to go.  For more information or questions, call Carol (843) 478-8414 or Lee Ann (843) 822-5248.

Tuesday November 4, 2014 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Washington Park Northeast corner of Broad and Meeting Streets

6:30pm

Ghostly Stroll Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

All tours are $20 per person. Reservations may be made on tour website broadstreettours.com and will be confirmed by e-mail. Number of participants limited to 20.  Room permitting, reservations will be accepted the week of the conference.  Payment by cash or check will be collected at time of tour. (Please make checks to Carol Ezell-Gilson or Lee Ann Bain.) 

Tour will begin and end at the stairs of the Library Society located at 164 King Street. (The Library Society is almost a mile from the Francis Marion Hotel.)  A minimum of 6 people needed for tour to go.  For more information or questions, call Carol (843) 478-8414 or Lee Ann (843) 822-5248.

Tuesday November 4, 2014 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Library Society 164 King Street
 
Wednesday, November 5
 

9:00am

Evidence-Based Decisions on Collecting and Collections
Cost = $175, reduced to $100 for Ithaka S+R Local Survey participants. Registration required

Ithaka S+R is hosting a workshop to help academic and research libraries make more evidence-based decisions about their collecting and collections. This session will cover the format transitions for current collecting as well as collections management, especially for monographs and other books. Participants will be encouraged to bring their own data pertaining to their college or university, such as collections usage, survey findings, and budget documents, for group discussion. The workshop format will include the following components:
  • An overview of national-level data that help to contextualize this issue and frame some of the key issues that individual institutions may wish to consider;
  • Group discussion of strategies for incorporating evidence most effectively into institutional decision-making on these topics;
  • Group review of participants' institution-level data, including what is useful and what is missing; and
  • Time to begin formulating institutional plans for structuring evidence-based decision-making processes on these issues.
Participants will benefit from this workshop by improving their ability to incorporate evidence into decision-making processes about collections and collecting. Librarians who have implemented the Ithaka S+R Local Survey(s) are welcome to bring their results to the discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Recently, Roger has led the development of Ithaka S+R’s surveys for individual colleges and universities, to help them better serve the needs of their own faculty members and students. He has also led research and consulting projects on collections... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Excelling with Excel: Microsoft Excel Functions for Collection Analysis
Cost: $110, registration required (THIS SESSION IS NOW FULL)

Microsoft Excel offers useful features and formulas that potentially allow Librarians to work smarter, not harder. Using journal cancellations as a workplace scenario, the presenters will provide attendees with step-by-step instructions for organizing data and completing basic calculations with Excel. Participants will learn how to import and export data, combine and compare data from different sources, and formatting data to communicate more effectively. The presenters will demonstrate how to use several advanced Excel functions including filtering data, conditional formatting, and select formulas like vlookup. The session will be held in a classroom with computers (Addlestone Library Room 120), so attendees will be able to follow along by downloading an Excel file with sample data specifically created for this hands-on workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher C. Brown

Christopher C. Brown

Reference Technology Integration Librarian, University of Denver Libraries
University of Denver, Main Library
avatar for Denise Pan

Denise Pan

Associate Director, Technical Services, University of Colorado Denver
Since 2008 Denise Pan supports student, faculty, and staff success in the role of Associate Director of Technical Services for the Auraria Library. This tri-institutional academic library serves the University of Colorado Denver, Metropolitan State University of Denver, and Community College of Denver. She is responsible for the library materials budget and the overall acquisitions, access, discovery, and assessment of purchased and... Read More →
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Head of Collection Development, University of Colorado Boulder


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

9:00am

Know What You’re Getting: Content Analysis with MS Access
Cost: $110, registration required

There are a couple well-known tools available to compare database titles for an institution. However, these tools are limited by the very limited number of databases they compare and by their inability to combine content of the same vendor to analyze it against content provided by another vendor. In this same regard, Serials Solutions’ Overlap Analysis falls short also. In a series of tightly focused tutorials, this pre-conference will instruct participants in creating an MS Access database from start to finish using actual vendor title and holdings lists and in designing the appropriate queries to compare title and holdings content of multiple vendors. The focus will be on merging content offered by the same vendor and on holdings coverage and overlap, and an example will be made of alumni access databases offered by three different vendors whose content had to be analyzed to make a purchase decision.

Participants are asked to bring laptops installed with MS Office, as they will be supplied with the appropriate title lists and create their own Access database for content analysis during the tutorials.

Speakers
MV

Mr. Viral M Amin, MA, MS

Metadata / Electronic Resources Librarian, Marymount University
Marymount University


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Libraries as Participants in Online Learning
Slides from Franny Lee

Cost: $110, registration required


Online learning, distance learning, and particularly MOOCs have been increasingly on scope in meeting academic and public education needs. What do these growing areas mean for libraries? Do librarians have a role in such activities, and if so, in what way? This session will feature four case studies by librarians whose institutions have been involved in MOOCs and other online learning venues. Each presenter will describe his/her institution’s thinking and planning, and, in particular, the library’s role in supporting such efforts. The goal of the session is to provide information, generate discussion, and spark ideas about how your own library might be part of this dynamic virtual environment. We welcome participation and ideas from others who have experience in such work, apart from the speakers themselves.

Speakers
avatar for franny lee

franny lee

GM and VP SIPX (Co-Founder), SIPX (ProQuest, Ex Libris)
Franny Lee is GM and VP ProQuest SIPX and leads the team.  Franny is dedicated to harnessing technology to make content, copyright and education more accessible and affordable. She is a frequent speaker and writer on the emerging issues at the intersection of campus needs, libraries, online education, digital content and high technology, and serves on the Management Board of MIT Press.  Originally a composer and jazz musician, Franny... Read More →
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →
JR

Jeanne Richardson

Director, Collections and Scholarly Communication Office, Arizona State University
Jeanne Richardson is the Chief Officer of Collections and Scholarly Communication at the Arizona State University Libraries. She leads the libraries’ efforts to acquire information for the ASU community by advancing innovative national and international acquisition models with publishers and information vendors. Her work also involves active participation with national partners and organizations to preserve the print artifact in distributed... Read More →
avatar for Mark Sandler

Mark Sandler

Director, CIC Center for Library Initiatives, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)
Mark Sandler is the Director of the Center for Library Initiatives at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). He is interested in how libraries, publishers and users are managing the transition from print to electronic resources, with particular focus on the collaborative efforts of libraries to extend their mission to include content creation. He was a founder of the Text Creation Partnership, and has worked closely with the Google... Read More →
avatar for John Wang

John Wang

Associate University Librarian, Digital Access, Resources and Information Technology, University of Notre Dame


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

The Library as Publisher: Details, Practice, and Potential Outcomes
Cost: $199, registration required

Society for Scholarly Publishing Pre-conference Workshop

Whether directly running a university press, creating new content sets by virtue of a university open access repository, or putting together custom courseware, many libraries are now becoming de facto publishers. Brought to you by the Society for Scholarly Publishing, this panel of dynamic speakers and subject matter experts will focus on this shift in the library's role and discuss potential outcomes with respect to this emerging library practice.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Lecturer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment, Bonn served as the associate university librarian for publishing at the University of Michigan Library, with responsibility for publishing and scholarly... Read More →
BL

Byron Laws

Vice President, vPrompt eServices
avatar for Sarah Lippincott

Sarah Lippincott

Program Director, Library Publishing Coalition
Library publishing, digital scholarship, library-university press collaboration
avatar for Aaron McCullough

Aaron McCullough

Head, Scholarly Comm & Publishing, University of Illinois
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Product Sales Manager, The Americas, Altmetric.com
Sara Rouhi has worked in scholarly publishing for seven years and manages sales and outreach in North America for Altmetric.com. She speaks and runs workshops on metrics in practice and the scholarly publishing process at library and scholarly publishing conferences worldwide. | | She is an active member of the Society of Scholarly Publishing's Education Committee and currently runs their Librarian Focus Group program. She was awarded... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Keeping it Real: A Comprehensive and Transparent Evaluation of Electronic Resources
Cost: $150, registration required

There will be a time when your library will need to evaluate all of your electronic resources. How would you do it? In response to a cut to our materials budget, we have developed a method that condenses a large amount of information into a few select criteria. In this day-long workshop, we will walk through the process using the Decision Grid process developed by at the University of Maryland at College Park (Foudy and McManus 533-538) as a starting point. The workshop leaders will first demonstrate each step of our process, and then the participants will work in small groups (5-7) using their own experiences and a sample data set of their own. The steps covered will include selecting and defining the criteria, gathering and analyzing the data, and determining how to make final decisions. We will cover some technical aspects of gathering and analyzing data, including using Excel functions. We will also include discussions about the criteria and ways of eliciting honest and useful feedback from librarians and patrons. The participants will receive a flash drive with Excel templates that include formulas, as well as completed sheets with sample data, and the presentation files.

Speakers
avatar for Laurel Sammonds Crawford

Laurel Sammonds Crawford

Coordinator of Collection Development, University of North Texas Libraries
Laurel has a BS in Zoology and earned her MLIS from Louisiana State University. Her research interests include collection analysis, electronic resource use and delivery, and library leadership.
avatar for Todd Enoch

Todd Enoch

Head of Serials and Electronic Resources, University of North Texas
Todd Enoch obtained his MLS in 2005 from the University of North Texas while working in their library as a staff member, first in Cataloging and later in Serials. In February 2006, Todd was hired as a librarian at UNT, and has been working as the Head of Serials and Electronic Resources since 2008.
avatar for Karen Harker

Karen Harker

Collection Assessment Librarian, University of North Texas
University of North Texas


Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:00am - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:00am

EDItEUR / ICEDIS North American Meeting
 EDItEUR is the trade standards body for the global book and serials supply chains, with over 100 members in 23 countries around the world. ICEDIS (the International Committee on EDI for Serials) is EDItEUR’s special interest group for subscriptions, serials and library supply. ICEDIS provides business input for the development of subscription standards and acts as the governance body for all of EDItEUR’s standards and best practice advice in this area. ICEDIS Terms of Reference provide a constitution and framework for its activities. ICEDIS will hold a North American meeting in Charleston at the Holiday Inn Charleston Historic Downtown, 425 Meeting Street, from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm on Wednesday November 5th.

Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:00am - 1:00pm
Holiday Inn Historic District

10:30am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP)

Join us for a light refreshment break to celebrate the opening of the 2014 Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase and provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.


Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:30am - 11:00am
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Vendor Showcase
Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibitors. Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies. We can't wait to see you there! Booths will be throughout the Mezzanine Level in the Carolina Ballroom, pre-function areas outside the ballroom, the Calhoun Room, the Pinckney Room, and on the second floor in the Gold Ballroom.

Wednesday November 5, 2014 10:30am - 6:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:00pm

Vendor Showcase Lunch
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the exhibits in the Francis Marion Hotel.

Wednesday November 5, 2014 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

Advanced Data Analysis: From Excel PivotTables to Microsoft Access
Cost: $110, registration required

Most librarians run for the hills when they hear about Microsoft Excel PivotTables and relational databases such as Microsoft Access. PivotTables can be a powerful analysis tool. However, Microsoft Access can move beyond PivotTables by exploring more complex relationships between datasets. Building from the morning session, participants will learn additional Excel functions including PivotTables and PivotCharts, as well as Access tables, queries, forms and reports. The session will be held in a classroom with computers (Addlestone Library Room 120). Attendees will receive sample data and will be able to create their own relational database at the end of this hands-on workshop. Please note, attendance in the morning session is not a prerequisite for this session.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher C. Brown

Christopher C. Brown

Reference Technology Integration Librarian, University of Denver Libraries
University of Denver, Main Library
avatar for Denise Pan

Denise Pan

Associate Director, Technical Services, University of Colorado Denver
Since 2008 Denise Pan supports student, faculty, and staff success in the role of Associate Director of Technical Services for the Auraria Library. This tri-institutional academic library serves the University of Colorado Denver, Metropolitan State University of Denver, and Community College of Denver. She is responsible for the library materials budget and the overall acquisitions, access, discovery, and assessment of purchased and... Read More →
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Head of Collection Development, University of Colorado Boulder


Wednesday November 5, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

1:00pm

Building eBook Collections for the Long Term
Cost: $110, registration required.

Many academic libraries have been relatively slow to build eBook collections for the long term, relying instead on leasing content, purchasing limited use titles and often quietly relegating selection to library users thus implementing short term selection modalities predominantly in lieu of long term collection building. Libraries may be abdicating a professional role in selection and collection development by using these limited view approaches. Professional involvement may be no more than designing subject profiles intended to limit exposure of the library’s budget while offering preselected areas of potential additions. This workshop is a ringing call for academic librarians to engage in responsible, proactive collection development for the “new” format of eBooks. It is right for our profession, right for the long term support of scholarly monographs, and right for our users. We will:
  • Present several approaches and basic principles for building eBook collections for the long term,
  • Present overviews of the current state of the eBook industry,
  • Describe library wide support facilitating multi-modal approaches to eBook collection building,
  • Report on the immediate impact of eBook collection building on a typical university campus,
  • Describe the roles, reactions, and involvement of students, faculty, and the campus bookstore,
  • Analyze use data and use patterns as well as cost effectiveness metrics.

In addition to a variety of library staff, we will be joined by professionals who work with libraries and eBook publishers directly.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Collection Development Librarian and Liaison Coordinator, Davidson College
avatar for Celeste Feather

Celeste Feather

Senior Director, Licensing & Partnerships, LYRASIS
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Peggy Hoon

Peggy Hoon

Scholarly Communications Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am a licensed attorney who has worked as a Scholarly Communications Librarian in the higher education setting since 1998. Before coming to UNC Charlotte in 2011, I shaped this position at NC State University Libraries. For purposes of this conference, my significant experience in working with the licenses that accompany library licensed e-resources is the most relevant aspect of my position. Further information can be found on my LinkedIn... Read More →
avatar for October Ivins

October Ivins

Principal and Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions
October was an academic librarian for 20 years at UNC and LSU, and was an executive at two Boston area publishing services dot coms.  She is an independent consultant to publishers and other content providers, associations, libraries, and consortia.  Projects typically include market research, product and license development, pricing, and/or marketing strategy.  She earned both BA and MLS degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill and completed PhD coursework... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Siler

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I am also Project Team member on the Mellon Funded Charlotte Initiative which focuses on the future of the Academic eBook Market. My presentations at Charleston this year, will focus mostly on usage statistics and how they can be used to help make collection decisions.
BS

Brad Spry

Library Webmaster, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Stanley Wilder

Stanley Wilder

Dean of Libraries, Louisiana State University
Stanley Wilder is the Dean of Libraries, Louisiana State University. His previous experience includes work at UNC Charlotte, the University of Rochester, LSU, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. His degrees come from UIC, Columbia, and the University of Wisconsin.


Wednesday November 5, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Campus Open Access Policies: The Importance of Being Open, Earnestly

Cost: $110, Registration Required

This preconference is organized jointly by COAPI (the Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions) and SPARC. The session will be jointly sponsored and planned across the two coalitions.

These sessions will allow participants to learn about developing and implementing campus-­‐wide open access policies, the impact of such policies, and how participants across the library spectrum can play a role in the success of campus open access policies.

Session A: Open Access Policies and Library/Publisher Collaboration for Mutual Success

This session will explore the importance of campus open access policies and how librarians and publishers are working together to bring more scholarly literature to the world. Delivered in the form of question-­‐led panel discussion, this session will demonstrate ways in which librarians and publishers – open access and traditional -­‐-­‐ can work together on mutually agreed-­‐upon goals in a productive manner, while ensuring campus open access policies are able to meet the goals their universities have set for greater access to institutional scholarship.

Panelists include:

  • Ellen Duranceau, Program Manager for Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing, MIT
  • Laura Bowering Mullen, Behavioral Sciences Librarian and Co-­‐Chair, Rutgers Open Access Policy Implementation Working Group, Rutgers
  • Dave Scherer, Scholarly Repository Specialist, Purdue e-­‐Pubs, Purdue
  • Julie Kimbrough, Clinical Assistant Professor of Law and Assistant Director for Collections and Access, UNC Chapel Hill
  • Dean Sanderson,Commercial Director/EVP of Sales & Marketing, Nature Publishing Group
  • Elizabeth Marincola, CEO, PLOS


Moderated by: Andrew Wesolek, Clemson University and Shawn Daugherty, SPARC

Session B: The Library Role in Supporting and Implementing Campus Open Access Policies This session will offer a brief introduction to Open Access Workflows for Academic Librarians (OAWAL), followed by group participation in contributing to the OAWAL resource.

Speakers include:

  • Graham Stone, Information Resources Manager, University of Huddersfield
  • Jill Emery, Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University 

Moderated by: Jen Waller, Miami University -­‐ Ohio

 


Moderators
avatar for Shawn Daugherty

Shawn Daugherty

Assistant Director for Operations, SPARC
Shawn serves as the Assistant Director for Operations, handling member services, federal and state policy, and general operations. Prior to joining the SPARC team in 2014, Shawn worked at The Sheridan Group as a Senior Policy Associate, where she developed and implemented advocacy strategies for her non-profit clients -- and one of her clients happened to be SPARC! She has also had the privilege of working for Senator Edward Kennedy on the Senate... Read More →
avatar for Jen Waller

Jen Waller

Open Educational Resources & Scholarly Communication Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries
AW

Andrew Wesolek

Head of Digital Scholarship, Clemson University
Andrew Wesolek began his professional career as Scholarly Communication Librarian at Utah State University.  In this role, he managed a thriving institutional repository, roughly doubling its size to nearly 36,000 items in two years of service. Wesolek also administered an Open Access Fund and collaborated with stakeholders across campus in the passage of an Institutional Open Access Policy in 2012.  Subsequently, Wesolek chaired the... Read More →

Speakers
ED

Ellen Duranceau

Program Manager for Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing, MIT
Ellen Finnie Duranceau is the Program Manager for the MIT Libraries' Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright & Licensing, a position she has held  since 2006. She leads the MIT Libraries' outreach efforts to faculty in support of scholarly publication reform and open access activities at MIT, including overseeing implementation of the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy. In addition, she acts as the Libraries' chief resource... Read More →
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University
JK

Julie Kimbrough

Assistant Director for Collections & Access, UNC Chapel Hill
Julie Kimbrough is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law and Assistant Director for Collections and Access, Kathrine R. Everett Law Library. She currently teaches Advanced Legal Research. Julie is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Millsaps College and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She earned her Juris Doctor and Master of Science in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and she is a member of the North Carolina State... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Marincola

Elizabeth Marincola

CEO, PLOS
Elizabeth Marincola received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University in 1981 and her MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business in 1986. She is CEO of PLOS (the Public Library of Science), a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco which was founded to transform science communication. PLOS has been a leader in the Open Access movement, publishing more OA articles in 2013 than any other publisher. Marincola was Executive... Read More →
avatar for Laura Bowering Mullen

Laura Bowering Mullen

Behavioral Sciences Librarian; Open Access Specialist, Rutgers Library of Science and Medicine
Laura Bowering Mullen is Behavioral Sciences Librarian and Open Access Specialist at Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey. In addition to her many years of experience as an academic science librarian and team leader for science collections at the Rutgers Library of Science and Medicine, she holds positions in scholarly communication areas. Mullen chairs the Rutgers Libraries’ Committee on Scholarly Communication, and is the Libraries... Read More →
DS

Dean Sanderson

Commercial Director/EVP of Sales & Marketing, Nature Publishing Group
Dean Sanderson is NPG's Commercial Director, with global responsibility for content sales to institutional customers as well as for marketing. Dean joined NPG in June 2008 from sister organization Scientific American, Inc., where he managed the company’s international subsidiaries, joint ventures and license partners. Prior to joining NPG, Dean spent over twenty years in the consumer media industry in both North America and Europe. He began... Read More →
avatar for David Scherer

David Scherer

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
David Scherer is the assistant to the dean of libraries at Carnegie Mellon University. Previously, David was the scholarly repository specialist with the Purdue University Libraries. In that role he oversaw Purdue’s primary institutional repository, Purdue e-Pubs, and educated faculty on open ac- cess and author rights, new models of publishing, and opportunities for open access publishing. Alongside his colleagues at the Purdue University... Read More →
avatar for Graham Stone

Graham Stone

Information Resources Manager, University of Huddersfield
Graham is Information Resources Manager at the University of Huddersfield UK where he manages the library’s information resources budget, including acquisitions, subscriptions and APC payments. He also manages the University Repository and University Press. Graham has been involved with a number of Jisc projects including Huddersfield Open Access Publishing and the OA best practice pathfinder project. He is co-author of OAWAL (Open Access... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Negotiating with Vendors
Cost: $110, registration required

The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven't spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You'll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both parties' obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you'll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Basch Associates
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member of publishing and finance committees.
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director of Library Relations, Business Expert Press / Momentum Press
Adam manages library relations for Business Expert Press and Momentum Press, two new companies which publish ebooks for business students and engineering professionals, respectively.  Previously he was Content Director for the American Society for Training and Development; prior to that, he held sales, customer relations, and customer service positions at the American Chemical Society; and customer relations, marketing... Read More →
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President, Gruenberg Consulting
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is president of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years of experience as a senior sales executive in the information industry. His new book, “Buying and Selling Information: A Guide for Information Professionals and Salespeople to... Read More →
WS

Ward Shaw

Independent Investor
Ward Shaw is a private investor and frequent contributor within the scholarly information community. Previously, he founded and owned the CARL Corporation and UnCover Inc., and served as Chairman and CEO of those companies. He was Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Associate Director of Libraries at the University of Denver, and at Colby College. He holds degrees from Hamilton College, Simmons College, and an... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Strauch

Bruce Strauch

Professor of Business Law, The Citadel
Bruce Strauch, J.D. is a Professor of Business Law and Director of the Citadel Mentors Program. He holds degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill and Oxford, is extensively published in the field of copyright and trademark, is the author of nine novels and the publisher of a trade journal of the scholarly publishing industry. His wife Katina is the founder of the Charleston Conference and Assistant Dean for Technical Services and Collection Development at... Read More →
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy


Wednesday November 5, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

Sustainable Strategies for Digital Resources
Cost: $175, registration required.

This half-day workshop will introduce project leaders to the basics of sustainability planning, help them define the challenges they face, establish ambitious but realistic sustainability goals, and sketch out a plan to achieve them. The workshop will include group participation and will share real-world examples, illustrated by case studies of digital projects that really worked …or didn't. The session will introduce participants to the “Sustainability Planning Tool” a tool designed by Ithaka S+R to help guide those leading digital resource projects in choosing and testing the strategies that will work best for them.Libraries, scholarly societies, and other cultural heritage organizations today are building digital resources that are valuable for community engagement, teaching, and scholarship, including multi-format educational projects to digitized collections to born-digital works and innovative software tools.

While some may be experiments and are valuable for the experience they offer or the capacity they build within an institution, others create collections of content, dynamic websites, or other resources that are intended to continue well beyond their initial creation. As these projects and resources continue, their creators often face the challenge of identifying financial and non-financial resources that will permit them to maintain their value over time. This session encourages project leaders to define the intended impact of a digital project, assess its current or potential audience and the wider environment in which it operates, and consider sources of financial and non-financial support, using tools developed with feedback from hundreds of project leaders worldwide.

What Attendees Will Learn:
  • How to set sustainability goals for your project
  • How to identify the activities you need to undertake to reach those goals
  • How to determine the costs to reach these goals
  • Models for continual funding

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

President, BlueSky to BluePrint, LLC
Independent consultant, researcher and strategist, helping publishers and leaders of digital initiatives develop strong business plans and sound funding models.


Wednesday November 5, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by SPARC

Join us for a light refreshment break during the 2014 Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase, and will be provided for the preconference attendees in the Courtyard Marriott as well.


Wednesday November 5, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:30pm

Vendor Showcase Reception
Wine bar sponsored by Springer

Visit the Showcase before it closes and enjoy wine, cheese, and fruit at the reception. The wine bar will be located inside the Carolina Ballroom and Gold Ballroom, but food will be scattered throughout the Showcase floor.

Wednesday November 5, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Mezzanine Level, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

5:00pm

Juried Product Development Forums
Advanced Registration Required: Invitations will be emailed to all librarian attendees.  If you do not receive your invitation, please contact Leah Hinds (leah@katina.info).

The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Wednesday November 5, 2014 5:00pm - 6:15pm
TBA

5:30pm

Out of the Stacks Party
Join us for the 4th annual Out of the Stacks party, hosted by BiblioBoard.

Entertainment from Charleston's world famous ukelele/ragtime/jug band The V Tones. Enjoy appetizers and apertifs by some of Charleston's greatest gastronomical talent: Guerilla Cuisine, Palmetto Brewing Co, Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams, and Cannonborough Beverage Co.


Wednesday November 5, 2014 5:30pm - 8:00pm
Charleston Distilling Company 501 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:30pm

IOS Press Focus Group
Stop by to see Accucoms at booth 81 in the Vendor Showcase for more info!

IOS Press is an independent, international STM publishing house, publishing around 100 journals and 75 book titles each year, mostly in computer and medical sciences.

Wednesday November 5, 2014 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Thursday, November 6
 

6:30am

Move a Little, Drink a Latte: 5K or 1 Mi Fun Run
Sponsored by BiblioBoard

Map/Route

Join your fellow intrepid conference-goers for an early morning jaunt around some familiar Charleston haunts— 5k or 1 mile, run or walk, go the whole distance or just meet for an early coffee — it’s just a loosely organized* chance to get a little fresh air and fresh coffee to complement the conference’s fresh content.

Your itinerary:

6:05 am: turn off alarm clock, muster self-esteem, grab shoes

6:20 am: gather at Marion Square Park (near the obelisk), rain or shine

6:21 am - 6:29 am: exchange groggy hellos with fellow runners and/or walkers, mill about awkwardly, double-check suggested 5k and/or 1 mile maps.

6:30 am (sharpish): someone says, “ready, set, go!”

6:31 am - 7:00ish am: you’re out there, walking/running at your leisure, living the dream

7:00 am - 8:00 am: finish your adventure at Kudu Coffee House, and grab a cup 

8:00 am: back to the Conference!

*The fine print:  the run is non-certified, non-sanctioned, non-Boston qualifying, non-competitive, friendly, sidewalk-only events, and neither is officially or unofficially authorized or sponsored by the Charleston Conference. There will be no prize money, no police escorts, no waivers, no water stops, no fancy porta-potties, no sliced bananas at the finish line— that said, you could do worse than starting your day with a great cup of coffee and some nice new conference-wear.

 



Thursday November 6, 2014 6:30am - 7:45am
Marion Square Park (near the obelisk)

7:00am

Continental Breakfast
Sponsored by Cabell's International.

Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions. 


Thursday November 6, 2014 7:00am - 8:00am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:00am

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Overflow seating available in the Gold Ballroom and Colonial Ballroom

Speakers
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston


Thursday November 6, 2014 8:00am - 8:15am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:15am

Being Earnest In The New Normal
Video

The information industry and publishers and libraries are experiencing unprecedented change.  Anthea will share views on what's going on in the big picture and provide some ideas about new ways to manage and operate in these fast moving times.   

Speakers
avatar for Anthea Stratigos

Anthea Stratigos

Co-founder & CEO, Outsell, Inc.
Anthea C. Stratigos co-founded Outsell, Inc. with Gregory Chagaris, creating the leading research and advisory firm focused exclusively on media, information, and technology. She established the company’s research agenda and served as the firm’s first chief analyst. As CEO, she draws upon her deep experience in research and analytic businesses to drive product development, operations, marketing, and general management to lead all facets of... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 8:15am - 9:00am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

From Course Reserves…to Course Reversed? The Library’s Changing Role in Providing Textbook Content
Academic libraries have always thought of “content” as their domain on campus. Yet beyond the course reserve desk, libraries have traditionally played a relatively small role on campus for the most common form of content in higher education, textbooks. Today, everything about textbooks and other course content is changing quickly. Spiraling costs have made textbooks a political issue in some states, while at the same time traditional textbook publishers experience economic pressures both from the growth of the used and rental markets and from new technological demands from the professors who assign their online books as well as from the students who use them. Librarians have begun to take notice, reversing course on the traditional library view of textbooks. A number of libraries are looking for more affordable ways for students to access textbooks. Many are leveraging open educational resources (OER) as alternatives to expensive, commercially-published textbooks. Other libraries have themselves become textbook publishers. This changed course has led librarians sometimes into new alliances and sometimes into degrees of conflict with other organizations, such as bookstores, commercial publishers, university presses, and aggregators.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Charles Lyons

Charles Lyons

Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery, SUNY University at Buffalo
Charles Lyons is the Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery at the University at Buffalo. Previously, he worked in the corporate library at Lehman Brothers and in the Science and Engineering Libraries at the University of Virginia. He received his MS from Drexel University in 2002.
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President, Product Development, Ingram Library Services
Bob Nardini is Vice President, Product Development at Ingram Coutts.  He worked in both public and academic libraries prior to 1985, when he took a job in the academic bookselling industry, where he has been ever since.  In 2007 Nardini joined Coutts and since then has been involved in several areas of the company’s activity, including the development of the OASIS® and ipage® customer sites,  the MyiLibrary®... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 9:00am - 9:45am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:45am

Presentation of the ABC-Clio Vicky Speck Leadership Award
Vicky Speck ABC-CLIO Leadership Award is awarded every year to a leader in the Charleston Conference who has made a lasting contribution to the Conference’s mission. We have given the award to five people so far – Anthony Watkinson (2006), Jack Montgomery (2007), Beth Bernhardt (2008), Heather Miller (2009), Eleanor Cook (2010), Glenda Alvin (2011), Ramune Kubilius (2012), and Audrey Powers (2013).

Thursday November 6, 2014 9:45am - 9:50am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:50am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Thomson Reuters.


Thursday November 6, 2014 9:50am - 10:20am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:20am

Driving Discovery: Do You Have the Keys to Fair Linking? (It’s About Knowledge and Library Control)
Slides from Scott Bernier
Slides from Todd Carpenter

Slides from Bruce Heterick


Do concerns about “fair” linking make you wonder about discovery services? It’s time to understand HOW linking works. In the end, the power is in your hands. But do you know it? And maximize it? If search engines are optimized to provide the best results, regardless of the source of the content, or the resource from which a record originated, the focus is on the full-text linking. How and why did the link appear? What is the user experience? Do users want to see multiple links to full text or do they just want to see the article ? How effective (accurate, simple) is the link resolver experience for your users? How can it be optimized? How can usage via the link resolver be tracked back to the source? What are the emerging standards? This session explores fears of bias, the approaches to take control of your discovery service through customization, and ways to maximize the user experience. It covers all views from the discovery vendor perspective, participating content partner perspective, an over-arching look from the standards perspective, as well as from a university perspective associated consortium having needs to allow for customization at multiple universities with differing needs/opinions.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Bernier

Scott Bernier

Senior Vice President, EBSCO
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Bruce Heterick

Bruce Heterick

Vice President, ITHAKA
JSTOR
BS

Brian Sherman

Head of Access Services & Systems, LSU-Shreveport


Thursday November 6, 2014 10:20am - 11:10am
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:20am

DRM: A Publisher-Imposed Impediment to Progress, or a Legitimate Defense of Publisher/Author Intellectual Property Rights?
Digital distribution of content provides clear advantages to all stakeholders in scholarly communications, but it also introduces new complexities and challenges.  The exercise of control is a significant one.  Is media — whether for scholarly or for entertainment purposes— going to be more open, instead of closed?  Does stringent digital rights management (DRM) help or hinder the development and use of content?  Do devices which enable broader and more immediate access to content affect pricing and control?  How do librarians and publishers protect their interests, and ensure that content can be purchased, owned, and used most effectively?  Representatives from book, journal, and multimedia publishers talk about how they’ve determined what (if any) DRM is appropriate for their content, and a librarian discusses the impact DRM (or lack thereof) has on scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director of Library Relations, Business Expert Press / Momentum Press
Adam manages library relations for Business Expert Press and Momentum Press, two new companies which publish ebooks for business students and engineering professionals, respectively.  Previously he was Content Director for the American Society for Training and Development; prior to that, he held sales, customer relations, and customer service positions at the American Chemical Society; and customer relations, marketing... Read More →
JD

Jim Dooley

Head, Collection Services, University of California, Merced
Jim Dooley has been head of collections and technical services at the University of California, Merced since 2003.  Prior to coming to UC Merced he held a variety of positions in technical services and special collections at the University of Utah.  He serves on various University of California systemwide committees including collections licensing, shared print and cataloging and metadata services.  He has presented at previous... Read More →
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

VP, Editorial & Licensing, Alexander Street a ProQuest Company
David Parker is VP Editorial and Licensing for Alexander Street – the leading provider of video, multi-media databases and unique, curated content to the global university library market. Prior to his role with Alexander Street, David founded Business Expert Press and served as the President of Business Expert Press and its sister company, Momentum Press. BEP and MP specialize in applied, concise ebooks for advanced business and engineering... Read More →
avatar for Zac Rolnik

Zac Rolnik

President and Publisher, now publishers
Zac Rolnik has spent the last 25+ years in the academic publishing industry and is the founder and publisher at now publishers (www.nowpublishers.com).


Thursday November 6, 2014 10:20am - 11:10am
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:20am

Science Education Gone Wilde: Creating Science References that Work
"My nephew, you seem to be displaying signs of triviality."
"On the contrary, Aunt Augusta. I've now realised for the first time in my life the vital Importance of being Earnest."
--Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

Science education suffers from more than a little bit of its own problem with earnestness and triviality. As politicians, education reformers, and social critics point out relentlessly, STEM literacy is crucial to the nation's well-being, not simply as an economic driver but because average citizens must increasingly grapple with the practical and ethical impacts of new science and technologies in their lives. Most conversations about science education and, indeed, most educational science works therefore come wrapped in a mantle of earnest gravitas—which is a shame because it only reinforces the joyless “eat your vegetables, they're good for you” impression with which much of the public regards science and makes students approach their science lessons with dutiful, doomed resignation. This is not a formula for success.

Some science communicators, particularly those in the general media, recognize this problem and try a lighter approach to explaining science. The danger there, however, is that they can flirt with triviality. They may succeed in making science seem appealing, but at the risk of portraying science as a carnival of disjointed fun facts. Neither extreme does justice to conveying the real vitality and substance of science, and neither does much to help students (and others) find careers or otherwise prosper in a STEM-dominated future.

John Rennie, editorial director of McGraw-Hill Education's AccessScience, a recipient of the Carl Sagan Award for Public Understanding of Science, and a former editor in chief of Scientific American, will discuss better ways to communicate science both meaningfully and appealingly. With examples drawn from his decades of experience working in print, online, and television, he will explore the significance of accuracy (and what that really means), relevance, context, credibility and authority, as well as the importance of (earnestly!) anticipating an audience's needs and expectations.

Speakers
avatar for John Rennie

John Rennie

Editorial Director, AccessScience, McGraw-Hill Education
John Rennie is a science writer, editor, and lecturer based in New York. Viewers of The Weather Channel know him as the host of the original series Hacking The Planet and co-host of the hit special The Truth About Twisters. He is also the editorial director of science for McGraw-Hill Education, overseeing its highly respected AccessScience online reference and theMcGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology.


Thursday November 6, 2014 10:20am - 11:10am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Beyond the ‘Cool’ Factor: Which New Technology Driven Products Will Really Meet Your Needs?
Slides from Rick Anderson

New ideas, business models and technologies enter the scholarly landscape at an ever-increasing rate. In response to this deluge of potential innovation, lightning talks, shotgun sessions and elevator pitches designed to help us understand these technologies have become a mainstay of publishing and library conferences alike. Despite this, it is very difficult for libraries and publishers alike to not only keep up with it all, but to understand which technologies will truly help them meet their specific needs and goals as well as serving academics at every stage of the research cycle.

This session will offer an overview of this complex, shifting landscape, and to explore the ways in which we might think about the role of technology in the scholarly landscape. What will really help us engage with our patrons and users? Which products will help us satisfy our specific missions? Whether you’re a Librarian, a publisher or even a technologist with an idea, the session aims provide you with a framework for thinking about technology driven products that goes beyond the cool factor and matches productized technologies to real points of need.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
avatar for David Burgoyne

David Burgoyne

Head of eProduct Management, Taylor & Francis Group
David Burgoyne has been at T&F for over 9 years and heads up the eProduct Management team in the Journals division, responsible for T&F's flagship journals platform Taylor & Francis Online. A graduate of Lancaster University and Oxford Brookes, David’s role and that of his team is to develop the platform to meet the needs of researchers, librarians, authors, societies, funders, editors, reviewers; all those with an... Read More →
avatar for Michael Clarke

Michael Clarke

President, Clarke & Company
Michael Clarke is the President of Clarke & Company, a management consulting firm working at the intersection of technology, business, and content. Clarke & Company focuses on digital strategy, product and development, and market research related to professional and scholarly publishing. Clients have included the American Medical Association, the American College of Cardiology, the National Academy of Sciences, Annual Reviews, Radiological... Read More →
avatar for Phill Jones

Phill Jones

Head of Publisher Outreach, Digital Science
Phill Jones is Head of Publisher Outreach at Digital Science, where he works particularly closely with portfolio companies ReadCube, Altmetric, Figshare, and Overleaf. Phill has spent much of his career working on projects that use technology to accelerate scientific discovery. He joined Digital Science from portfolio company ReadCube, where he held the position of VP of Business Development. | In a former life, Phill was a... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Building Capacity in Your Library for Research Data Management Support (Or What We Learned from Offering to Review DMPs)
In our ongoing effort to build infrastructure and support around research data management needs, we found traction in launching a data management plan review service. In doing so, we have been able to achieve multiple goals:

(1) support the research process;
(2) create active learning opportunities for subject liaisons to engage in and learn how to support data management planning;
(3) find resonance with campus sponsored research officers;
(4) collaborate with other campus research support groups including campus IT, institutional review board, statistical consulting; and
(5) participate in the national dialogue about the tensions of data management. This session will describe the components of our data management plan review service, how different stakeholders participate in the process, and how subject liaisons learn to engage in research data management in a collaborative, supportive environment.

Attendees are invited to raise questions, pose ideas, and address concerns around this model of research data management support. Participants will take away ideas for running a data management plan review service, gain insights for leveraging subject liaisons in research engagement, and learn how to tap into a broader collaboration network at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
North Carolina State University Libraries


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Collection Development, E-Resources, and Meeting the Needs of People with Disabilities
Access barriers do not only exist in the physical environment but also online. Just as particular architectural design features make it possible, or impossible, for people with certain disabilities to move about independently, so does the design of the electronic environment, which includes all the library e-resources, creates either enabling or disabling conditions.Recent research indicates that when librarians make decisions about the selection of specific online resources, such as e-books and article databases, the needs of people with disabilities are rarely on their radar screen. Collection development policies requiring conformance to established accessibility standards, Section 508 and WCAG 2.0, are currently the exception rather than the rule. Also, books on collection development, often used as textbooks to train the next generation of librarians, do not cover the issue adequately, if they address it at all. This program, which brings together the perspectives of three speakers—a researcher, a university administrator with expertise in accessibility issues, and a major database vendor representative—is particularly tailored towards librarians involved in selecting e-resources for their institutions. The presentations will take up 45 minutes, with additional time for discussion. At the end of this program, attendees will more knowledgeable about how collection development decisions impact the accessibility of e-resources to people with disabilities, be informed about California State University's approach to accessibility and library e-learning resources, better understand the vendor's perspective on this issue, and be encouraged to develop effective strategies to make the online environment at their own libraries more inclusive.

Speakers
avatar for Michele Bruno

Michele Bruno

Program Manager, Accessibility, Cengage Learning
Michele Bruno leads efforts to define and promote accessibility standards,processes, implementation and communication for Cengage Learning, a $2billion educational publisher and one of the ten largest publishers in theworld. Partnering directly with business stakeholders, product teams,technical development teams, and user experience designers, together theydrive development of accessible solutions from early planning throughimplementation in... Read More →
avatar for Cheryl Pruitt

Cheryl Pruitt

Director of the Accessible Technology Initiative (ATI), California State University, Office of the Chancellor
Cheryl is the Director of the Accessible Technology Initiative (ATI) for the California State University (CSU) System. She oversees the ATI implementation across the CSU 23 campus system. Cheryl has been involved with the ATI since the beginning in 2007, first at the campus level, then at the systemwide level. Under her leadership the system has made significant progress towards implementing ATI process improvement in the areas of web... Read More →
avatar for Axel Schmetzke

Axel Schmetzke

Reference and Instruction Librarian/Professor, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Axel provides reference services and co-ordinates the Library’s instructional program at the UWSP Library. Previously, he earned his living as college instructor (educational foundations), disabilities professional, and special education teacher. In addition to a Ph.D. in Educational Policy Studies (UW-Madison, 1993), he holds master-level degrees in Communicative Disorders, Special Education, and Library & Information Science. Most known for... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Developing a Weighted Collection Development Allocation Formula
Librarians are always looking for ways to get the most out of their limited collection development budgets. Many are revisiting their allocation procedures to see if there are better methods of distributing funds to each subject area.Arkansas State University makes annual collection development allocations to academic departments and units using a weighted allocation formula. The use of weights applied to each formula factor is key to the success of this formula. Factors include the number of students majoring in each degree program, departmental semester credit hour production at various levels, the number of faculty in each department, and the average costs of books and journals in each discipline.The presenters will discuss how the formula is constructed, factors used and why each was selected, and the assigning of weights to each factor. The basic formula will be demonstrated live during the session and attendees will be able to see how seemingly small changes in one part of the formula can lead to major changes in the results.Participants will take away an understanding of the process of creating a collection development allocation formula and leave with access to the basic version of a working allocation formula they can modify for use at their library.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity.  In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services, including several years leading collection development at Arkansas State.  Jeff received his MSLS from Clarion University of Pennsylvania when online searching... Read More →
avatar for Linda Creibaum

Linda Creibaum

Acquisitions and Serials Librarian, Arkansas State University
Linda Creibaum is Acquisitions and Serials Librarian at Arkansas State University, where for the last 15 years she has been fascinated at the change in library resource formats and the nature of the “problems” she solves in her work day. Linda has worked in a variety of library positions, including Solo Librarian and Instructional Services Librarian.


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Digital and Physical: Co-evolving Formats in Today’s Research Libraries
Academic libraries have been at pivotal crossroads for some years as deans and their staffers realize the perplexing shortage of shelf space for print volumes while at the same time determining the optimum balance of physical resources on shelves in light of the exploding world of online digital information. The question of what is the best format for the library users’ research, teaching and scholarship continues to be analyzed, assessed, and discussed. As a result, new and innovative library business models are evolving that consider dramatically "revisioning" floors of library space to accommodate the ever-changing needs of library users while at the same time providing a limitless quantity of research resources. Various methodologies, as it relates to library collections, have emerged from pioneering thinkers affiliated with such organizations as OCLC, ITHAKA with its JSTOR & Portico initiatives, the HathiTrust Digital Library, and the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). There are a host of challenges and possibilities as library systems collaborate and dialogue with each other and with these organizations’ representatives. When actions are implemented to effectively accommodate what the evolving society of information-seeking users must have for their educational and research needs, then positive perceptions of a library’s critical role in higher education can and will surface. The University of Maryland Library System, one of the newest members of the CIC, has been able to take enormous strides in its evolving business model. Perfecting the coevolution of formats -- print and digital -- thus meeting the demands of an ever-growing number of users, paired with the libraries’ renewed confidence in reducing the physical collections’ redundancy based on the notion of shared print repositories(SPR) have been tested and the new model is working.This discussion will center around the various stages, some of the challenges, and a few promising outcomes resulting from co-evolving information formats at the University of Maryland Libraries -- one of the CIC’s east coast “hubs of collective collections.”

Speakers
CS

Cynthia Sorrell

Librarian / Asst. Manager of Collections, University of Maryland Libraries


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Earnestly Seeking Greater Flexibility: The Pros and Cons of Pay-Per-View Journal Access
This presentation sheds light on a relatively new phenomenon that needs more earnest consideration from all kinds of libraries: the switch to a pay-per-view (PPV) access model for journals. The presenters, one from a corporate library background and one from an academic background, have extensive experience in utilizing PPV. They plan to detail pros and cons of PPV and how it allows for greater access for users with more financial flexibility for acquisitions budgets. Discussions among acquisitions and collection development librarians in recent years have focused on demand-driven acquisitions (DDA) for e-books. The presenters believe that PPV for journals is in the same vein but even more far-reaching and beneficial.

Speakers
MM

Marija Markovic

Independent Consultant, Acute Source, Inc.
Marija Markovic holds M.S.LIS and M.A. degrees from the University of Illinois. For over a decade, she has worked in the corporate library setting as a copyright compliance expert, contract negotiator for electronic journals and books, and has directed collection development activities for global organizations. Recently, Marija started a consulting company focused on demystifying copyright law for librarians, authors, marketing teams and other... Read More →
avatar for Steve Oberg

Steve Oberg

Assistant Professor, Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Wheaton College
Electronic Resources and Serials | Wheaton College | | Adjunct Faculty | Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science | | Adjunct Faculty | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Graduate School of Library and Information Science


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

How Libraries Use Publisher Metadata Redux
Library cataloging departments can no longer keep up with the deluge of electronic publishing content and must rely on publisher-provided metadata to support access to this content. This session will provide an overview of how library catalogs, link resolvers and discovery systems work and will present case studies of how publisher metadata embedded in these systems supports the discovery experience for academic library users. Examples from several publishers will be highlighted to illustrate different approaches that publishers can take in providing metadata to libraries and library service providers. Attendees will also learn about existing metadata standards that address metadata quality and formats.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Shadle

Steve Shadle

Serials Access Librarian, University of Washington
Steve's primary responsibility at the University of Washington Libraries is to manage the library linking systems that provide access to journal full-text. In addition, he catalogs eSerials selected and licensed by the UW Libraries. Steve's background in serial standards began with his work as an ISSN Cataloger at the Library of Congress and currently includes serving on the NISO Standing Committee for Presentation and Identification of... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Improving the Library Research Skills of Graduate Students & Postdocs: Perspectives from a Librarian and a Former Postdoc
Upon entering a new research environment, graduate students and postdocs are faced with the quickly changing scientific topics of the graduate curriculum and research laboratory. These young scientists have to effectively identify, locate, evaluate and digest information, and do it quickly, yet the necessary library research skills are often missing. Young career scientists often learn these skills from their lab mates, mentors, and friends, in addition to trial and error. Library instruction, usually available through the graduate school orientation as well as via the institution’s library, is an important resource for a successful research career. The first half of this session will assess the learning experience of a typical graduate student/postdoc, and point out some of the strategies and resources that were found especially valuable (for example building searches in PubMed, PubMed search within the reference manager, and literature recommendation services, such as F1000Prime). The second half of the session will discuss strategies how a library instruction program can be designed to reach graduate students and postdocs. This session will provide attendees with ideas on how to better align the library program with what graduate students/postdocs want to learn and how best to teach it. Attendees will be encouraged to share their tips and experiences on instructing young life scientists about library skills during the session.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Feltes

Carol Feltes

University Librarian, Rockefeller University
avatar for Kinga Hosszu

Kinga Hosszu

Outreach Director, Faculty of 1000
Dr. Hosszu graduated from Stony Brook University, where she studied the role of dendritic cells during the development of systemic lupus erythematosus for her Ph.D .thesis. She then spent two years in the lab of Dr. Berhane Ghebrehiwet as a postdoctoral associate uncovering how the complement protein C1q regulates dendritic cell development and differentiation. Next, Dr. Hosszu joined the lab of Dr. Nicholas Carpino at Stony Brook University... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

ISNI and Contributor Disambiguation
The International Standard Name Identifier, an ISO information standard published in 2012, is gaining adoption in various domains such as literature, scholarly research, music, film, and patent application. Laura Dawson, Product Manager for the ISNI at Bowker/ProQuest, will explain ISNI's purpose and review implementations; a designate from the Harvard Library will discuss why HL joined ISNI and what benefit it is getting from using it.

Speakers
LD

Laura Dawson

Product Manager, Identifier Services, Bowker/ProQuest
Laura Dawson is Product Manager for Identifiers at Bowker. Previously, she has worked at the following companies: | | Firebrand | Muze/Rovi | SirsiDynix | Barnes & Noble.com | Independent booksellers | Bantam Spectra Books | Doubleday | | Laura has also been an independent consultant to the publishing industry. Her clients have included: | | Bowker | McGraw-Hill Higher Education | Cengage | Audible | Alibris | Loyola Press | Carson-Dellosa... Read More →
MD

Michelle Durocher

Head, Metadata Management / Interim Head, Metadata Creation, Harvard Library, Harvard University
Michelle Durocher is enthusiastic about the evolving landscape of metadata exchange in the global information landscape. Michelle believes that our greatest gains in information discovery come from multi-institution projects and cooperative ventures. A particular passion is looking for creative collaborations between publishers and libraries, including the OAQ project underway in the Harvard Library. The Online Author Questionnaire (OAQ) is... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

11:30am

Just a Click Away: One Academic Library's Experience with Patron-driven Streaming Video Licensing
Building on the success of an electronic book PDA program, Milner Library at Illinois State University decided to dip a toe into streaming media on-demand licensing. The library is working with Kanopy, a distributor of online educational video, to implement a patron-driven streaming video licensing service. By making the thousands of films in Kanopy’s catalog available to our users, Milner Library hopes to provide a growing selection of relevant streaming video to support teaching, learning, and research at Illinois State University.This presentation will cover our library's experiences and strategies during the planning stage (determining need, vendor and content selection, identifying stakeholders, securing funding, etc.) and outcomes from the initial months of implementation (promotion and outreach, communication with Kanopy, preparing and loading MARC records, etc.). We will also cover usage statistics and more general observations about user response to the program.

Speakers
AF

Anita Foster

Electronic Resources Officer, Ohio State University
AS

Anne Shelley

Music/Multimedia Librarian, Milner Library, Illinois State University


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Print Reference: Is It Dead Yet?
For centuries, reference books have been the royalty of print library collections. They received special locations, special circulation status, and were revered as major sources of information. Yet in today’s libraries reference books are almost never used. Is print dead as a publishing format for reference materials? Two librarians and two publishers will discuss the future viability of print reference. They will look at user preferences, publishing costs, and alternatives to print reference books. They will discuss which works and genres should remain in print, which should be published as ebooks or databases, and which should no longer be produced at all.

Objectives:

  1. Debate print as a viable publication format for reference sources. 

  2. Review use patterns of print materials in one large reference collection (Fresno State). 

  3. Discuss alternatives to building separate reference collections.


Speakers
avatar for Rolf Janke

Rolf Janke

CEO, Mission Bell Media
Rolf is currently CEO and founder of Mission Bell Media, a publishing company with a content focus on leadership and leadership studies for academic library and faculty markets. Previous to that, he was the VP and Publisher and founder of SAGE Reference, an imprint under SAGE Publications creating a successful and award winning brand of both print and digital products.  He was also VP and Publisher at ABC-Clio and Editorial Director at... Read More →
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Executive Market Research Manager, SAGE
Elisabeth Leonard is the Executive Market Research Manager at SAGE, where she leads the investigation of market trends and runds SAGE's library advisory boards. Leonard comes to SAGE from Western Carolina University where she was the Associate Dean for Library Services for the last two years. Prior to that, she had served as the Head of Reference, Instruction and Outreach in the Social Sciences and Humanities Library at the University of... Read More →
avatar for Marla Peppers

Marla Peppers

Associate University Librarian, California State University, Los Angeles
avatar for David Tyckoson

David Tyckoson

Associate Dean, California State University, Fresno
David Tyckoson is the Associate Dean of the Henry Madden Library at California State University, Fresno. He regularly teaches an online course through Infopeople on Rethinking Reference Collections. He has also written a number of articles on various aspects of reference services and teaches RUSA’s online class on the Reference Interview. David served as President of RUSA in 2007-2008 and won the Mudge Award for distinguished contributions to... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Real Time Acquisition Workflows- Vendors & Libraries Panel
This year, library staff at Willamette University, as members of a larger testing group, piloted the latest acquisitions functionality developed by Ex Libris and YBP for the Alma library management service. This new collaboration provides automated workflows for the end-to-end selection and acquisition of content between our vendor systems. Now library staff can select content in the YBP platform, and upon purchase, the content and related acquisition information are updated in Alma in real time, without the need to upload records or re-enter acquisition data. By saving time and resources, this integration enables librarians to dedicate more time to providing valuable services to end users. In this session, we will discuss the lessons and outcomes of the pilot and implementation process, including observed time savings.

Speakers
avatar for Ann-Marie Breaux

Ann-Marie Breaux

Vice President, Academic Service Integration, YBP Library Services
Ann-Marie Breaux works for YBP Library Services, developing and implementing technical and workflow services for customers. Based in Woodstock, Georgia, Ann-Marie has worked for YBP since 1997. Prior to that, she worked in a variety of acquisitions and cataloging positions for Lamont and Hilles undergraduate libraries at Harvard. Ann-Marie has an AB from Harvard University and an MLS from Simmons College.
avatar for Liz Butterfield

Liz Butterfield

Monographs and Acquisitions Manager, Willamette University
AS

Amanda Schmidt

Solutions Architect, Ex Libris


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Successful E-Resource Acquisitions: Looking Beyond Selecting, Ordering, Paying and Receiving to Discovery and Access

E-resource acquisition began as a complex process and libraries struggled to manage it. When e-resources first arrived, librarians spent considerable time determining how to acquire these resources. A movement ensued to generate the best methods for selecting, ordering, negotiating licenses, choosing content and paying. Libraries were prompted to develop new workflows. Time has passed and acquisitions functions have mostly been standardized. However, with the acquisition of electronic resources comes the challenges of discovery and access. Now that many libraries feel more comfortable in acquiring e-resources with the help of technology, cloud-based services and task coordination, they are moving beyond acquisitions and focusing on discovery and access. It takes much time and great effort to efficiently manage e-resources so that there is seamless discovery and access.

The transition from print to electronic is a continuous process for most libraries as they allocate funds for electronic serials and books. Workflows are being developed that incorporate not only new technology, but also, new staff skills and knowledge. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to new workflows and technologies that VCU libraries has adopted to provide discovery and access. The discussion will begin with a presentation of how workflows have changed since the implementation of Alma, a cloud-based library management system and the influx of e-resources. Attendees will be led in a lively discussion and information sharing session to identify successful methods that can be used to move e-resources beyond acquisitions. Attendees will be exposed to a number of ideas for improving the management of their e-resources after acquisition and will leave the session with a greater understanding of the opportunities available to academic libraries in the cloud. In conclusion there will be a discussion of how e-resource acquisition expertise is diverging in response to discovery and access. 


Speakers
avatar for Denise Branch

Denise Branch

Head, Continuing Resources, Virginia Commonwealth University
Denise is a native of Powhatan, Virginia and the Head of Continuing Resources at the VCU Libraries, earning her B.S. from VCU and M.L.I.S. from The Catholic University of America. Managing e-serials within the Ex Libris Alma and Primo system keeps her busy. She contributes her expertise for licensing, ordering, receiving and maintaining the Libraries’ extensive collection of e-serials. Overseeing the answering of user e-journal reports and... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

The Big Shift: How VCU Libraries Moved 1.5 Million Volumes to Prepare for the Construction of a New Library
The Problem: Over the years, VCU Libraries (VCUL) has been creative in dealing with inadequacy of space. Built in 1975, James Branch Cabell (Cabell) library is more than 90% over capacity, and optimum user space is lacking. Initiatives to correct this include the digital shift. As we repurpose our space, going digital is a big part of it. Subscribing to electronic only journals has been our preference. Replacing print series with the digital version as they become available is another ongoing practice. None of these measures could bring the building closer to 21st Century standard. We went from an enrollment of 21,764 in 1990 to 32, 284 in 2009. By 2010, in order to meet VCUL’s aspiration and projected service goals for the next 20 years and beyond, it was imperative that we build an addition to Cabell and renovate the old space.

The Solution: To accomplish this goal, the architects’ study and consequent library planning for functional areas revealed that there will be a total of 156,000 square feet, of which 63,000 will be renovated space. To reach this target, we did the following:-reduced the size of the very large reference collection by moving items to stacks, storage, and withdrawing. -gave up a large portion of government documents, particularly those available online.-moved part of the media collection to storage.This meant moving about 177,000 volumes out of Cabell to relinquish the amount of space specified for renovation in the architect’s drawing. But with both onsite and off-site storage full to capacity, what followed was a domino style high impact activity, with maximum volume manpower.

The Plan: First, collection management librarians reviewed the collection in off-site and onsite storage facilities, using a variety of criteria and made decisions about materials to keep, store or withdraw from the collection. The second step is to remove items designated for off-site storage to a temporary holding facility to allow for the installation of high density compact shelving which can accommodate up to 500 thousand volumes. The third stage is to review the circulating collection and remove those that meet certain defined criteria to store or withdraw. Catalogers kept track of deaccessioning of withdrawn materials at each stage. The fourth stage is to shift the remaining volumes in the stacks.

The Execution: This paper shares our process for dealing with this “mammoth glacier.” Moving our construction forward, involves about 90 staff, helpers and volunteers, in four major departments who, since last October, reviewed, touched, moved, shelved or stored, or withdrew 1.5 volumes, with minimal disruption or inconvenience to users, a phenomenon we call “The Big Shift”.

Speakers
avatar for Ibironke Lawal

Ibironke Lawal

Science & Engineering Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
I have been at VCU for over a decade as collections librarian and liaison to the School of Engineering and science departments in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Providing effective service to students, moving them toward academic excellence, assisting faculty to reach their career goals are the things that motivate me. Apart from my regular duties, I have worked as chair of Diversity Plan Task Force and LibQUAL+TMTask Force, and member... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Selinger

Patricia Selinger

Head, Preservation and Inventory Management, Virginia Commonwealth University
Skill set: bookbinding, book repair, preventive conservation, collections care, training interns, custom enclosures, book art, pop-up structures, environmental monitoring, disaster planning and recovery.


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

The Buck Stops Here: Assessing the Value of E-book Subscriptions at Columbia University Libraries
This paper builds on the ideas presented in The Future Landscape of E-Book Programs at Columbia University Libraries (Charleston Conference 2013, poster session). The objective is to describe an assessment methodology used at Columbia University Libraries which evaluated the cost-benefit of subscribed e-book collections. By appraising several databases, we were able to analyze cost and usage to determine the actual value of these resources. This work involved conducting cost and overlap analyses as well as examining usage data which identified common usage trends. The method was applied on two separate occasions in the Collection Development department and the Science and Engineering Division Libraries between January and May of 2014. In both cases, the method provided actionable results and has standardized e-book evaluation and negotiation tactics across campus. This is an ongoing initiative that will help us document the e-book landscape and build data sets that will inform collection development decisions.

The outcomes of this study yielded a savings of approximately $70,000 for the 2015 fiscal year. Since we worked with subscription packages, the savings will be ongoing and allowed us to evaluate how to allocate resources to best support the needs of the user community. In both cases, we spoke to the vendor and found opportunities for price negotiation and discussions related to platform performance. We hope evidence provided in this assessment project will offer librarians new negotiation strategies when evaluating their own e-book collections and determining how to allocate resources. It also demonstrates the importance of advocating for standardized usage statistics from vendors and publishers. We also hope to solicit feedback from the audience to further refine the methodology and determine how it can be successfully applied in other library environments.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Goertzen

Melissa Goertzen

Collection Development Analysis & Support Librarian, Columbia University Libraries
I am the Collection Development Analysis & Support Librarian at Columbia University. Much of my work involves monitoring budgets, examining business models, and analyzing workflows. In 2016, I completed a two year assessment project that examined how e-books are used for research, teaching, and learning activities . The results informed collection development best practices and recommendations for continued e-book services. To learn more... Read More →
avatar for Krystie Wilfong

Krystie Wilfong

Collection Assessment and Analysis Librarian, Columbia University
Krystie is the Collection Assessment & Analysis Librarian for the Science and Engineering division of Columbia University Libraries. She received her B.A. from Gettysburg College in 2008 and her M.L.I.S. from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science in 2013. Previously, Krystie worked for a STM publisher providing marketing and implementation assistance to academic institutions.


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

The Signal and the Noise: Libraries and Institutional Data Analytics
Higher education institutions are paying increased attention to the collection and analysis of institutional data. The quality of student learning, faculty research, departments, and support services are increasingly linked to data analytics and to our ability to make evidence-based decisions on strategic issues facing our institutions. Despite the potential of institutional data analytics, many librarians, information technology professionals, and institutional research staff believe their own institutions are not making the most effective use of institutional data. This panel will explore the question of how libraries can play a leading role in developing or expanding effective institutional data analytics programs (DAPs). Libraries can play a large role in moving institutions from data collection and reporting to the proactive use of data to inform decision making on vital issues, including the impact of library collections and services on metrics of success such as student learning or faculty research productivity. Contributing to the creation of DAPs is one of the new roles academic libraries can play as they transform themselves from knowledge support providers to strategic, collaborative campus partners. The panel will outline the benefits of creating/enhancing a campus DAP, the challenges to such a creation/enhancement, and solutions to those challenges within the context of the critical role that libraries can play in promoting data analytics as a means of addressing strategic campus issues.

Audience members will learn to develop strategies for playing a leading role in the development of an effective institutional data analytics program at their institutions, identify challenges to creating a robust institutional data program and ways to overcome those challenges, and assess institutional readiness to create a strategic, proactive institutional data program through an interactive exercise based around an “institutional readiness” instrument handed out during the presentation.

Speakers
HA

H. Austin Booth

Vice Provost, University at Buffalo
avatar for Charles Lyons

Charles Lyons

Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery, SUNY University at Buffalo
Charles Lyons is the Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery at the University at Buffalo. Previously, he worked in the corporate library at Lehman Brothers and in the Science and Engineering Libraries at the University of Virginia. He received his MS from Drexel University in 2002.
KO

Kathleen O'Brien

Data and Assessment Officer, University at Buffalo


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

11:30am

You Got Surveyed! Real-time Polling on the Landscape of Use-Driven Acquisition
Just when you thought it was safe to go back to Charleston—another program on use-driven acquisition! This unique and dynamic session will use audience polling to generate real-time data on the transforming landscape of use-driven acquisition (UDA) among librarians, vendors, and publishers. Use-driven acquisition has evolved from a limited number of pilot programs to a proven method of collection development utilized by a wide variety of libraries and offered by numerous vendors and publishers. It is vital that librarians considering implementing UDA and that those who wish to maximize the potential of their current UDAs stay cognizant of the current environment so that they can make well-informed decisions. The presenters will create a variety of timely and relevant survey questions relating to all aspects of planning and sustaining use-driven acquisition in libraries. Topics will include considerations for implementation, budgeting, collection management, technical requirements, marketing, assessment, stimulating new trends, and future directions. The presenters will utilize Poll Everywhere to engage the audience through survey questions, real-time replies, and immediate display of their responses. This innovative session will inspire lively interaction and discussion, and will embolden the attendees to participate in an anonymous atmosphere.

Participants will gain knowledge of the shifting landscape of UDA and will simultaneously contribute to that body of knowledge. They will develop deeper awareness of the elements to consider when planning, maintaining, and assessing UDA in their own libraries. The nature of this session will encourage discourse and lively debate on provocative topics such as short-term loans and consortia UDA; participants will be energized to continue the discussion conference-wide. They will return to their own institutions more confident in their abilities to make decisions that will enhance and optimize their UDAs.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Gallagher

Erin Gallagher

Electronic Resources Librarian, Rollins College
Erin Gallagher is the E-Resources and Serials Librarian at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida.  She received her MLIS from Florida State University and worked as a Collections Consultant with Ingram Coutts before delving back into academia.  Erin’s research interests include use-driven acquisitions and library/vendor relations.  She enjoys reading, traveling, hiking, cooking, and researching shipwrecks.
avatar for Michelle Leonard

Michelle Leonard

Environmental Sciences & Natural Resources Librarian, University of Florida


Thursday November 6, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:00pm

Reimagining the Library for Visibility, Viability, and Relevance in an Electronic World!

Registration Required

Take a break from your busy conference day as you’re invited to a ProQuest-sponsored luncheon about reimagining and transforming library systems.

Nannette Naught, founder and information strategist at Information Management Team (IMT) Incorporated, will be speaking about her experience in modeling library data to bear on a conceptual framework enabling libraries to achieve true transformation. During her talk, Ms. Naught will describe four key pillars of next generation library systems. 


Speakers
NN

Nannette Naught

Founder, Vice President Strategy & Implementation, Information Management Team (IMT), Inc.


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:00pm - 1:30pm
STARS Rooftop and Grill 495 King St Charleston, SC 29403

12:30pm

Creating a Google-Like Experience with Real Discovery Results

Sponsored by EBSCO - Advanced Registration Required

Discovery is a relatively new concept that has improved previous library search methods - but from a user’s perspective, it still may not be ideal.

 Improving the discovery search experience has largely focused on what is being searched but what about how users are searching? Users, especially those from the digital native generation,  are accustomed to Google and Wikipedia. If information professionals insist that users learn a different way of searching on discovery products, we risk imposing a poor and unfamiliar experience on those users.  The design of discovery products might need to be in harmony with the Google and Wikipedia experiences that are such a natural reflexes for users, so that their overall experience is intuitive and aligns with their mental models and expectations of how the web-based navigation and content behave.  During this presentation, we will describe the findings from multiple qualitative research studies about Google and Wikipedia usage, including:

  • What elements do users respond to positively on Google and Wikipedia?
  • How are Google and Wikipedia forming user expectations and reinforcing habits?
  • How do users typically refine their searches in Google (and from what page), and what are their opinions about other search engine sites?

We will also look at other factors that impact user behavior such cognitive styles, cognitive overload/”underload”, multitasking, and user web reading habits.  In addition, we will summarize theories on information encountering and points of user engagement/disengagement/reengagement.  We will conclude our presentation with an open-floor discussion on how to translate users’ behavior and expectation into features on the discovery system that facilitate and support a true discovery process.  


Speakers
avatar for Deirdre Costello

Deirdre Costello

Principal UX Researcher, EBSCO Information Services
Comic books, animal rights and UX, of course!
avatar for Rong Tang

Rong Tang

Associate Professor and Director, Simmons GSLIS Usability Lab, Simmons College
Usability evaluation and user behavior research


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

50 Shades of Grey and Beyond: The Impact of Pop Culture on Collection Development. Do traditional methods of building collections bring these materials in or filter them out?

There are few that would disagree that pop culture influences how we live, think, behave, buy, learn etc. It's also clear that pop culture has influence in the academic community, and many areas of study,  including Literature, Arts, Philosophy, Religion, Economics, Psychology, Sociology, Business many others.  Large numbers of books are published each year in all genre categories. For the academic community, many of these books traditionally would not fall under an academic materials umbrella but are relevant to support the ongoing study of how pop culture shapes modern life.  How do vendors and universities select appropriate titles to add to collections to support studies of something so broad, impactful and important? How do you get the right books on the shelves to support educators and students? 

In this session, Joyce Skokut, Director of Collection Development for Ingram Content Group, Pam Mackintosh, Economics Librarian and Coordinator, Shapiro Library Reference Services at the University of Michigan and Genya O’Gara, Director of Collections, James Madison University Libraries & Educational Technologies, will provide their thoughts, including successes and lessons learned, on integrating pop culture into their collections. A review of solutions and workflows that are helping their libraries successfully integrate modern titles in an academic setting will be provided and standing order plans, approval plans and journal review workflows will be discussed.


Speakers
avatar for Pam MacKintosh

Pam MacKintosh

Collection Coordinator, Shapiro Undergraduate Library and Coordinator of Shapiro Library Reference Services, University of Michigan
Pam MacKintosh is Coordinator, Shapiro Library Reference Services at the University of Michigan and serves as the collection coordinator for undergraduate collections.  
avatar for Genya O'Gara

Genya O'Gara

VIVA Associate Director, VIVA - The Virtual Library of Virginia
Genya O’Gara is the Associate Director of the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA), a consortium of 72 nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia. Genya received her Master’s in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has held previous positions in Collection Management and Special Collections at North Carolina State University, most recently serving as the Director of Collections at James... Read More →
JS

Joyce Skokut

Ingram Library Services, Ingram/Coutts
Joyce Skokut is Director, Collection Development for Ingram Content Group's library services business unit. In this role, Joyce supports publishers and academic and public library customers worldwide, providing her expertise and guidance on physical and digital content acquisition and collection development models for the library community. Ms. Skokut joined Ingram in 2002, supporting customers in product planning and analysis and managed... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

A Sustainable Ebook Ecosystem: Librarian, Publisher, and Vendor Perspectives
The session brings together representatives from a research library, major vendor, leading not-for-profit press, and large commercial publisher to discuss challenges posed by the current “Wild West” environment for e-books, in which technological options, pricing regimes, and business models are in constant flux, and are exacerbated by financial pressures.

Libraries, publishers, and vendors share a common goal of providing the best support for users’ needs through the provision of the largest possible universe of relevant content. How might key players have productive dialogues focused on advancing equitable long-term strategies that recognize we all are parts of the same e-books ecosystem? To what degree can librarians, publishers, and vendors cooperatively define a shared framework for e-book vending to ensure the sustainability of a rich and efficient ecosystem? What are the essential perspectives that each needs to understand and accept as legitimate? This is an important discussion that must be engaged now.

Speakers
AH

Alan Harvey

Director, Stanford University Press
LS

Luke Swindler

Collections Management Officer, Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Luke Swindler has been working in collections for over three decades. In his current position he has a leading role in analyzing, planning, and managing library collections generally and spearheading e-books initiatives specifically for the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
avatar for Michael  Zeoli

Michael Zeoli

VP, eContent Development, YBP Library Services
YBP Library Services, 1997-current | ebrary, 2005-2007 | Regenstein Library, Acquisitions Dept., University of Chicago | http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/virtual_conferences/eternal_ebooks/


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Being Earnest about Institutional Repositories

Quickly following what many expected to be a wholesale revolution in library practices, many institutional repositories encountered unforeseen problems and a surprising lack of impact. Clunky or cumbersome interfaces, lack of value and use by scholars, fear of copyright infringement and the like tended to dampen excitement and adoption. Libraries that have repositories, and those considering whether or not to take the plunge, are asking a number of questions we hope to address and discuss.

This lively lunch discussion will address four particular topics that are constant areas of focus for institutional repositories:

1. Choosing a Platform
2. Setting Policies
3. Recruiting and Creating Content
4. Measuring Success 

Topics and themes that will be discussed at this lively lunch will mirror an upcoming Charleston Insights Series publication that is scheduled to be completed prior to the 2015 Charleston Conference. Audience members will have likely experienced some of these concerns, so we expect them to join our lively discussion with questions and comments. Participants will walk away with an enhanced understanding of how to launch IRs, how the role of the IR has evolved, and what are some of the possible future directions of IRs.


Speakers
avatar for Burton Callicott

Burton Callicott

Reference Librarian, College of Charleston
I am the Instruction Coordinator for the College of Charleston Addlestone Library and I am interested in Institutional Repositories. I am helping to get the CofC IR, The Charleston ARC, off the ground and running and, with Andrew Wesolek and David Scherer, I just had an edited volume, Making Institutional Repositories Work, published with Purdue UP.
avatar for David Scherer

David Scherer

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
David Scherer is the assistant to the dean of libraries at Carnegie Mellon University. Previously, David was the scholarly repository specialist with the Purdue University Libraries. In that role he oversaw Purdue’s primary institutional repository, Purdue e-Pubs, and educated faculty on open ac- cess and author rights, new models of publishing, and opportunities for open access publishing. Alongside his colleagues at the Purdue University... Read More →
AW

Andrew Wesolek

Head of Digital Scholarship, Clemson University
Andrew Wesolek began his professional career as Scholarly Communication Librarian at Utah State University.  In this role, he managed a thriving institutional repository, roughly doubling its size to nearly 36,000 items in two years of service. Wesolek also administered an Open Access Fund and collaborated with stakeholders across campus in the passage of an Institutional Open Access Policy in 2012.  Subsequently, Wesolek chaired the... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Bringing Players to the Table: Consortial Ebook and DDA Selection, Purchasing, and Management
Consortia represent greater buying power and leverage for many libraries, but they face challenges in negotiation pricing and licensing agreements for Demand-Driven Acquisitions (DDA) programs as well as in representing them for discovery.  Come hear about two consortia’s, WNCLN Network and USMAI, experiences with shared DDA and ebook programs from investigation to implementation and discovery. Attendees will learn:


  • How to create a consortial program for DDA or ebook purchasing and to communicate with partner institutions, match priorities, and use leverage to increase consortial access to DDA titles.

  • What DDA consortia models are available to networks, particularly in comparison to separate DDA plans for individual libraries, and about the Limited Access Model.

  • What management challenges exist for consortia, including administering shared budgets among schools with  varying size and resources, the creation of a shared DDA profile, and DDA record management within a shared catalog

  • About technical set up of shared DDA ebooks programs to enable discovery. 

  • About consortial advocacy for the library perspective in the selection and purchasing process and how consortia might to work with vendors and publishers to find a sustainable model that works for everyone.



A discussion with the audience will follow the presentation, sharing additional concerns or options for consortial DDA.

Speakers
LA

Lynda Aldana

Head of Technical Services & Library IT Services, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Lynda Aldana has been the Head of Technical Services at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) since March 2009. Prior to working at the Albin O. Kuhn Library, she worked as the Coordinator for the Cataloging Department at the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at Johns Hopkins University.
avatar for Beth Cramer

Beth Cramer

Coordinator, Bibliographic Services, Belk Library, Appalachian State University
Beth acquires, loads, and manages ebooks; manages cataloging and other technical services projects; and is the collection management librarian for Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at Belk Library and Information Commons, Appalachian State University.
avatar for Amy Elliott

Amy Elliott

Product Analyst, WorldCat knowledge base and WorldShare Metadata Services, OCLC
I'm interested in connecting users with information, whether that's as a reference librarian, a repository manager, an e-resources librarian, or a product analyst. I'm also passionate about intellectual property, copyright, and authors' rights. Non-library interests include food, wood turning, and just creating things in general.
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Lead Librarian for Acquisitions/Budget Officer, Appalachian State University
Rachel Fleming is Lead Librarian for Acquisitions at Appalachian State University, where she manages the acquisition of all material types. She has previously served as Serials Librarian at Western Carolina University and Collection Development librarian at Central College in Pella, Iowa. Rachel has overseen serials cancellation projects, and complete collection reviews. She holds an MA in library science from the University of Missouri &ndash... Read More →
SI

Susan Israel

E-Resources Librarian, D. Hidden Ramsey Library, UNC Asheville
RL

Randall Lowe

Collection Development, Acquisitions & Serials Librarian, Frostburg State University
Randy Lowe has served in various positions in the Lewis J. Ort Library at Frostburg State University since 1997 and is currently Collection Development, Acquisitions & Serials Librarian. He has been responsible for the acquisition, licensing, data collection, and assessment of electronic resources during his entire tenure at Frostburg and is active in electronic resources management for the University System of Maryland and Affiliated... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Crisis or Opportunity? Tips for Collection Development in an OA World
Graham Stone, University of Huddersfield & Jill Emery, Portland State University will co-present on ways librarians involved in collection development can build upon their skills to evolve their operational processes to handle scholarly content in a mostly OA scholarly world. based on the best practices crowdsourced with the OAWAL: open access workflows for academic librarians project, Graham and Jill will Librarians will present tips on how to identify and select appropriate OA material, manage budgets that may be based on article processing charges & memberships, workflows others have developed for collection processes, and have relevant and meaningful conversations with faculty and researchers in multiple disciplines on the support and development of open access content.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University
avatar for Graham Stone

Graham Stone

Information Resources Manager, University of Huddersfield
Graham is Information Resources Manager at the University of Huddersfield UK where he manages the library’s information resources budget, including acquisitions, subscriptions and APC payments. He also manages the University Repository and University Press. Graham has been involved with a number of Jisc projects including Huddersfield Open Access Publishing and the OA best practice pathfinder project. He is co-author of OAWAL (Open Access... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Do Libraries’ Needs Still Match Publisher Offerings? “The Truth is Rarely Pure and Never Simple” (Oscar Wilde)
A panel representing both library and publisher perspectives will explore library collection trends and demands versus what publishers offer based on years of observation and experience within the industry. The current trends in collection development and acquisition will be explored by illuminating the multitude of options available from price models, product types and the variety of platforms. The second half of the lunch will open up discussion in an attempt to outline the principles of an ideal acquisitions model beneficial to both publishers and libraries.

Speakers
JB

John Banionis

Sales Manager, NA - Future Science Group, ACCUCOMS
NJ

Nadia J. Lalla

Assistant Director, Collections & Information Services, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan
Nadia Lalla, M.L.I.S. (McGill Univ.), is employed at the University of Michigan where she is responsible for all collection development activities in the health sciences library as well as the delivery and assessment of its information services. Her professional career includes stints as a reference librarian for undergraduates, a solo librarian for a nonprofit organization, a research analyst, and a consultant. Nadia is a an active member in... Read More →
DW

Don West

Sales Director, North America, ACCUCOMS


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

E-book Rights: Advocacy in Action
Ebook rights advocacy efforts began nearly from the moment the format appeared. The topics have evolved over time but significant issues and the need for ongoing discussion and negotiation remain. To this end, Macalester College published an Ebook Advocacy Statement in 2013. Since then several libraries have signed on. Most importantly, productive conversations with ebook providers and vendors have ensued. In this session, a brief review of the statement’s genesis will be followed by an open dialog between Macalester and a representative from Ingram’s MyiLibrary, the terms of the statement will be discussed from both points of view. Participants should anticipate gaining insight on the current trends in ebook usage terms as well as a better understanding of the library, publisher, and ebook provider points of view. Attendees will also observe a strong library/vendor relationship that is rooted in a willingness to deeply engage on these topics while appreciating each others knowledge, needs, and realities that may serve as a launching point for positive change. Even though the parties do not agree on all issues, and the library is not actively purchasing ebooks, the speakers have committed to continually learning together so that in time we will both be able to fully meet the needs of our organizations and communities. We will encourage a rich Q&A/discussion period at the end.

Speakers
KG

Katy Gabrio

Assistant Director - Collection Development & Discovery, Macalester College
Conference Chair, 2017 LibTech Conference
avatar for Whitney Murphy

Whitney Murphy

Product Manager, MyiLibrary, Ingram Content Group


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Earnestly Attempting to Roll with the Punches: The Impact of Publishers’ Short-Term Loan Rate Increases on Library Acquisition Options
For a variety of reasons, libraries have explored new acquisitions models, in particular the use of short-term loans (STLs) and demand-driven acquisitions (DDA) of ebooks. The reasons for embracing these options are diverse: shifting collection development practices, assuring use of purchased materials, coping with lower budgets, offering access to supplementary content, expanding library services, etc. As popular as these options have become, libraries do not undertake implementation lightly. It can be challenging to gain acceptance of the DDA/STL models and achieve a balance with traditional collection development practices. Once a DDA/STL program is in place, it can be a winning situation for libraries and publishers. Libraries can offer access to larger ebook collections than they could buy outright and pay only when content is actually used. Publishers can earn STL fees on titles that would otherwise not have been purchased, and benefit when more titles are made accessible by their customers. When libraries leave DDA titles in place, publishers benefit in terms of fees and purchases that accumulate over the long term.

An equilibrium of sorts was achieved between the new and old. But in May 2014, it was announced that several publishers decided to dramatically increase the cost of STLs for their DDA content, a decision that has caused widespread angst in libraries. Librarians from four small consortia will discuss their very different DDA/STL programs and their before and after scenarios: how DDA was working, steps or plans to address the impact of recent publisher decisions, and why DDA/STLs should remain an acquisitions option. Join us for an open discussion about this overall situation and how it might play out in the long run.

Speakers
avatar for Lorraine Huddy

Lorraine Huddy

CTW Librarian for Collaborative Projects, Connecticut-Trinity-Wesleyan / CTW Consortium
In 2008, I started coordinating consortial activities among the libraries at Connecticut College, Trinity College and Wesleyan University. My primary focus has been on collection development, and over time, I’ve vacillated from being an advocate of practices that favor ebooks to taking a more cautionary stance. The benefits seem increasingly outweighed by issues such as discovery, usability, shareability, and accessibility. For this... Read More →
MP

Michael Persick

Head of Acquisitions and Serials, Haverford College / Tri-College Consortium (PA)
Mike Persick is Head of Acquisitions & Serials at Haverford College Library. Along with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore Colleges, Haverford is a member of the Tri-College Library Consortium. Mike helped create and co-manages the Tri-Colleges' joint approval plan and joint DDA program.
avatar for Pamela Skinner

Pamela Skinner

Head of Collection Development, Smith College / Five Colleges Consortium (MA)
I spent most of my career as a reference librarian at Smith College, with a brief detour into interlibrary loan; I became Head of Collection Development at Smith in 2012. My years of working with users, both one-on-one and in classes, informs my work in developing collections. I also served as chair of the Five Colleges' Resource Management Committee from 2013-2015. Other consortium members are Amherst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke colleges... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Guided Encounters: Mapping Content Strategies
The ecology of scholarly content and user behavior and expectations are changing. Cognitive maps and tools of librarians, vendors and publishers must adapt to keep pace. Discussants will describe our cardinal points of departure and examine how we provision for an environment of format agnostic, platform neutral content. Do our perspectives need to evolve to overcome the challenges of the changing content environment? Our survival may be dependent on successful strategies and tools to avoid being bypassed.Librarians, vendors and publishers are collaborators in this shared scholarly communication ecosystem. Each will reflect on how the upheavals are affecting our models and tools to reshape collection development and management. Revamped evidence-based assessment and analyses are indispensable methodologies to develop content strategy maps. Leveraging resources from the three worlds of library, vendor and publisher encourage integrated approaches and alliances in this shifting panorama.Discussants will identify and articulate what each knows and will need to know about the uncertainties that test each of us in an environment where resource renewal is cyclical and unpredictable. How do we manage in these uncharted territories? Our ability to stay relevant in unexplored terrain is vital.Presenters will engage the audience in brainstorming opportunities to navigate the unmapped landscape. We anticipate that this session will be provocative and stimulate conversations. Discussants invite audience comments and encourage attendees to use blogs and social media to trade and share their own visions. We encourage attendees to offer unconventional or untried ideas.

Moderators
GY

Gail Yokote

Associate University Librarian for Collection Services, University of California, Davis

Speakers
LA

Lenny Allen

Director, Institutional Accounts, Oxford University Press
JM

Jan Maxwell

Collections Strategist, Ohio State University


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

How to Handle Article Processing Charges: Learning, Sharing, and Looking Ahead

Slides from Barbara DeFelice
Slides from Patti Gallilee

Slides from Jennifer Goodrich

Slides from Simon Thomson


A growing number of funding bodies in the USA are mandating open access publication by those they fund and in the universities this is one reason for an increasing number of researchers who want to publish in open access or hybrid journals and seek financial help. Some universities have their own allocated funds but they and many others have to find some way of matching funding with publishers for their researchers. It is now customary see libraries as administrators for these funds: a UK group found the processing to be a “huge headache” for librarians there and in the USA there is a growing realisation that the “headache” has crossed the Atlantic and month by month is growing more severe.

This “lively lunch” is intended to bring a panel of speakers with experience into discussion with the various stakeholders represented at the Charleston Conference, not just librarians but publishers and intermediaries too and ideally researchers and funders. The context for newcomers to the complexities of paying for open access will be provided but the main business will be practical problems and possible solutions. The following speakers will give short initial presentations are Patty Gallilee, Associate University Librarian Collections & Scholarly Communication, who manages the fund at Simon Fraser University Library; Barbara DeFelice, Director, Digital Resources and Scholarly Communication Programs at Dartmouth College, who will discuss both her own practices and that of other US libraries; Simon Thomson, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Open Access Key, who has worked on a ground breaking project with Jisc Collections in the UK on behalf of the library community, and Jennifer Goodrich from the Copyright Clearance Center who have created a system for publishers. The session will be facilitated by Anthony Watkinson, Principal Consultant of CIBER Research

Those attending this session may find http://aoasg.org.au/managing-article-processing-charges/ produced by the Australian Open Access Support Group a useful introduction.

 


Moderators
avatar for Anthony  Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and is an associate of Oxford Brookes University and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of the Fiesole Retreats. He also consults for the Publishers Association and organises events and writes for the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Barbara DeFelice

Barbara DeFelice

Director, Digital Resources and Scholarly Communication Programs, Dartmouth College
Barbara DeFelice is the Director of the Digital Resources and Scholarly Communication Programs for the Dartmouth College Library. She develops and leads programs in the areas of open access, copyright, and publishing, with a focus on education and outreach to faculty, students, and staff through events, workshops, presentations, and individual discussions. She develops educational materials, policies, and guidelines to forward the needed... Read More →
avatar for Patty Gallilee

Patty Gallilee

Associate University Librarian Collections & Scholarly Communication, Simon Fraser University Library
Patty Gallilee is the Associate University Librarian, Collections & Scholarly Communication at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. Before working in Collections, she worked as a cataloguer, and in serials and acquisitions management. As administrator of the SFU Open Access Fund (2010-    ) she has worked closely with publication & author eligibility, author queries about the fund, and invoicing issues.
avatar for Jennifer Goodrich

Jennifer Goodrich

Director of Product Management, Copyright Clearance Center
As Director of Product Management at Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), Jennifer directs the development and evolution of the RightsLink® for Open Access platform. The platform, built on ten years of experience assisting publishers in collecting author charges, is CCC’s next generation service designed to simplify the collection and management of article processing charges or APCs. She and the RightsLink team work closely with... Read More →
avatar for Simon Thomson

Simon Thomson

Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Open Access Key
Simon began his career in academic publishing with Scandinavian University Press in 2000, subsequently purchased by Taylor & Francis. He held several positions including Head of Non-Subscription Income. In 2006 Simon accepted the role of Publishing Director with the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and headed the academic journals and INSPEC database divisions for 3 enjoyable years, before being offered the position of Director... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

I’ll Be Back: Post-Purchase Activities and ROI
What kinds of services and support should be expected after purchasing? Vendors are increasingly providing post-sale services to their customers, typically in the form of Account Development. This panel discussion will examine experiences that vendors, libraries and consortia have had with each other, including which services have been beneficial and what is still needed. Learn specific examples of past collaborations, such as customized trainings, usage analysis and professional development events. Librarians and vendors alike will have the opportunity to learn from their peers about making the most out of their resources. Afterwards, panelists will welcome questions and anecdotes from the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Arthur

Michael Arthur

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development, University of Central Florida
Michael Arthur is Head of Acquisitions & Collection Services at the University of Central Florida. Michael received his Bachelor of Science in Sport Marketing & Management in 1991, and his Master of Library Science in 1999, from Indiana University in Bloomington. He received his Master of Public Administration from Old Dominion University in 2006. Michael is active in ALA, and the North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG), and... Read More →
TB

Tim Bucknall

Assistant Dean of University Libraries, and Head of Electronic Resources and Information Technologies, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Tim is founder and convener of the Carolina Consortium, and an inventor of Journal Finder, the first Open URL link resolver. He was recently named the 2014 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.
avatar for Stephanie Kaelin

Stephanie Kaelin

Library Sales Manager, Cambridge University Press
Stephanie Kaelin enjoys a hybrid role, managing the Account Development program, which focuses on post-sale support and customer engagement, while also looking after sales in the NY region. She has over 10 years of experience at several major academic presses and is enthusiastic about finding areas of collaboration between libraries and publishers.
avatar for Sarah Schulman

Sarah Schulman

Account Development, Springer Nature
Account Development at Springer collaborates with librarians to help achieve the best possible value from their content. We use an ever-expanding list of methods and strategies, including: end user marketing assistance, statistical analysis and reporting, implementation assistance, trainings/events, and more!


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Open for Discussion: Open Access Resources and the Role of Academic Libraries
With nearly 10,000 Open Access journals currently in publication and climbing, librarians face the daunting task of parsing, cataloging, and supporting patrons in the use of vast quantities of content of varying quality that fall outside the bounds of traditional serials acquisition decisions. Even more crucially, the demand to publish in OA journals along with new institutional OA mandates are shifting the focus of library budgets and disrupting established business models. While the potential impact of the OA movement to academic libraries is great, until now there has been no way to quantify the real effect on resource management and the potential shift from subscription fees to article processing charges.

In this session, a panel consisting of content providers, a publishing consultant and a librarian will discuss new research into library selection of OA resources and involvement in researchers’ article submissions to OA publications. The survey conducted this year by Publishers Communication Group addresses such acquisitions issues as cataloging of OA journals, selection criteria, and library outreach to educate the research community of OA resources. The data delve further into the evolution of library funds to cover article submission fees, alternative sources of funding from the university, spending priorities and emerging business models. Attendees can expect to hear hard numbers outlining current OA trends alongside a lively debate of the function of the library in the OA era. We will answer such questions as: How do library article submission budgets compare to traditional subscription budgets? Is there a maximum fee that a library would pay to support faculty publication in OA journals? How are OA publishers facilitating OA fee packages or advance bundles for libraries? And what role if any should the library play in encouraging and supporting an OA mandate on campus?

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collections and Scholarly Communications, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Libraries
Beth Bernhardt is the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  She has her graduate degree in Library Science from the University of South Carolina.  Beth has over twenty years of experience working in academic libraries, fourteen of those years specializing in electronic resources. She serves on the Carolina Consortium team that works with... Read More →
avatar for Janet Fisher

Janet Fisher

Senior Publishing Consultant, Publishers Communication Group
Janet Fisher has been in scholarly journals publishing for over 20 years, with stints at University of Texas Press and MIT Press. In 2003 she moved to Ingenta and then to Publishers Communication Group as Senior Publishing Consultant. Janet works with  academic and commercial publishers to support their marketing  efforts through research, telemarketing and content sales. 
avatar for David Ross

David Ross

Executive Publisher, Open Access, SAGE Publications Ltd
As Executive Publisher for Open Access (OA), David has a global remit, responsible for the strategic direction SAGE’s OA journals program, as well as managing SAGE’S flagship OA titles: SAGE Open, SAGE Open Engineering, SAGE Open Medicine and SAGE Open Medical Case Reports. Alongside this David is also responsible for the development of the systems, process and policies that support SAGE’s OA publishing. David has a rich... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Selectors of the Future: What Should (or Can) They Learn in an MLIS Program?
What training for collection development and management needs to happen in MLIS programs? How much of what we do in collection development can be taught vs must simply be learned on the job? From concepts to practical skills to subject knowledge to current issues in formats and licensing, what are your priorities? How much expertise and background do you expect new librarians to have in collection development, and what do you prefer to teach them once they’re on the job? There’s a great deal of student interest in learning collection development, and this course is one of the most heavily-enrolled electives in the MLIS program at the University of Washington Information School, with both online and face-to-face sections filling quickly. While I often receive feedback from the students after they’ve landed a professional job involving selection, what I’m looking to gather from the Charleston audience is what you are seeking in new selectors or entry-level librarians, to create the most useful curriculum possible. This is also an opportunity for participants to share their experiences with hiring and training selectors—whether those are freshly-minted MLIS-holders, or librarians who happen to be new to a selecting area. My courses are based on what really happens in collection development, built off my experience as a subject selector with a tiny to middling budget, as a disciplinary bibliographer with the responsibility to predict user content needs several decades out, as a mentor to new and mid-level selectors, and as a project consultant to libraries and consortia. I look forward to hearing what you’d like to see in your new hires, and how I can help provide you with well-prepared, enthusiastic selectors and collection managers!

Speakers
avatar for Helene Williams

Helene Williams

Senior Lecturer, University of Washington Information School
University of Washington


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Staring into the Whale’s Mouth: Large-Scale Journal Deaccession at a Small University
Join staff from the Siena Heights University Library, a small, Catholic, liberal arts university in rural Southeast Michigan, for a lively discussion of a serious subject: bound and microform journal deaccession. Speakers will include both librarian and paraprofessional staff for a multi-faceted view of the organizational, historical, operational, and emotional concerns involved in a large-scale journal deaccession project. Participants will gain an understanding of how a large journal deaccession project may be managed, from initial conception to getting it done. The presenters will help participants think about the timeframe needed to plan and complete a project, which staff should be involved, steps necessary to complete the project, how to talk about the project internally and with stakeholders, potential pitfalls, and how to deal with problems as they arise…as they invariably will!

Speakers
RB

Renee Bracey

Circulation Coordinator, Siena Heights University
My name is Renee and I am the coordinator of all services in the library from reserving space to supervising student workers. | I have worked for the SHU library for 11 years and have worked for three years on repurposing the library into more space for students to use electronic devices and have a relaxed study area. In order to obtain that goal, we have weeded our book collection and migrated from print journals to online journals and... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Dean

Jennifer Dean

Director of Library, Siena Heights University
I am currently the library director at Siena Heights University in Adrian, MI. My past lives include work in collection development, interlibrary loan, and music in academic libraries, as well as director positions in both a public library and a library cooperative. I play the bassoon, I'm a PhD student studying Higher, Adult, & Lifelong Education at Michigan State University, and I love dogs. I'd love to talk with you about leadership, and the... Read More →
PH

Peggy Hlavka

Serial Services Coordinator, Siena Heights University
I have been employed at SHU for 4 years. As serial service coordinator, I work with online and print periodicals, databases, MelCat, (interlibrary loan system) and many small tasks. The last three years I have been busy downsizing the bound periodicals and microform collections. SHU is a growing university and the need for more study space and online resources has been a top priority. Now, for the fun things about me. I am a wife, mother and... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Parkview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Streamlined Licensing Through Institutional Master Agreements: A Success Story
Documents/Handouts

Are you tired of contracts sitting in review for weeks or months? Do you worry that access will be cut off? The presenters will discuss how the library and administration (including legal) have worked together to improve contract review, which has made the contract process more effective and efficient for The University of Tennessee’s libraries, contract offices, and the vendors. The University has implemented master agreements for the vast majority of its library resource vendors (primarily electronic resource and media). This initiative has also greatly strengthened the relationship between the libraries and the system administrators. The master agreement initiative is nothing short of a “win-win-win:” the librarians, the administration, and the vendors all benefit from this initiative. Before the master agreement initiative, the University processed between 250-400 library contracts in a given fiscal year. The University implemented the master agreement initiative in the fall of 2012, and it started with one master agreement and has grown into over 100. The University of Tennessee has reduced its volume of library electronic resource and media licensing agreements by 50-70%. This has caused the entire University’s contract process to be more efficient, and it has allowed the libraries to be more efficient and effective. When master agreements are in place, terms and conditions no longer sit in review for weeks or months, so there is virtually no danger of access being cut off. Also, the master agreements have allowed the University’s various campus libraries to work together to save money. Audience members will be encouraged to ask questions and a list of the master agreements will be provided to the audience via web link. Attendees can expect to learn an effective and efficient way to process contracts in a manner that benefits everyone and satisfies everyone’s concerns.

Speakers
avatar for Corey Halaychik

Corey Halaychik

Assistant Professor & Head, Acquisitions & Continuing Resources, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Licensing guy, negotiator of master agreements at the University of Tennessee Libraries, and co-chair of The Collective, I work to make libraries more efficient, saving time and money for  institutions and the people they serve.
BR

Blake Reagan

Director of Contracts Administration, University of Tennessee System


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

12:45pm

The Spaces Between: A Research Agenda between Libraries, Publishers, and Vendors
Slides from Joe Esposito

The publishers and vendors on whom academic libraries rely for materials and systems are undergoing substantial strategic change. As user expectations advance, usage data afford new service opportunities, and the economic postures of academic libraries shift, the more sophisticated publishers and vendors are informing their strategy with various types of largely proprietary research. Libraries and other publishers and vendors have little access to certain types of data and research that would be helpful to them in understanding changes in the marketplace in which they operate. We believe there are opportunities to mitigate this challenge with a focused program of ongoing community research in these areas.

Ithaka S+R is organizing this session as a roundtable discussion about the types of research that fall “between” libraries and their publisher and vendor partners that would be useful to conduct. Deanna Marcum, Ithaka S+R’s managing director, will serve as moderator. Providing some introductory remarks on the topics will be our panelists, Joseph J. Esposito, Processed Media, Roger Schonfeld, Ithaka S+R; and Susan Stearns, Boston Library Consortium. Much of the session will be given over to a roundtable discussion, not limited to the panel but including all session participants, to consider components of a research agenda in “the space between.”

Speakers
avatar for Joseph J. Esposito

Joseph J. Esposito

President, Processed Media
I am a management consultant working in the area of publishing, especially scholarly publishing, and digital media. I work with for-profit and not-for-profit companies. Most of my clients are CEOs or Boards of Directors, whom I advise on strategy. My aim is to help organizations make decisions. Good decisions cost more.
avatar for Deanna Marcum

Deanna Marcum

Managing Director, Ithaka S+R
As Ithaka S+R managing director, Deanna Marcum leads the research and consulting services that assist universities and colleges, libraries, publishers, and cultural institutions as they make the transition to the digital environment. She heads a growing staff of program directors and analysts with wide-ranging expertise. | | From 2003 to 2011, Deanna served as associate librarian for Library Services, Library of Congress. She managed 53... Read More →
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Recently, Roger has led the development of Ithaka S+R’s surveys for individual colleges and universities, to help them better serve the needs of their own faculty members and students. He has also led research and consulting projects on collections... Read More →
avatar for Susan Stearns

Susan Stearns

Executive Director, Boston Library Consortium and Project Director, EAST, Boston Library Consortium
Susan Stearns was appointed Executive Director of the Boston Library Consortium [BLC] in August, 2013. She began her career as a corporate and academic librarian, working at Abt Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia among others. Following her early years in libraries, Ms. Stearns worked for a number of vendors serving academic, special and public libraries including CLSI, Faxon... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

The Stakeholder Tightrope: How Three Nonprofit Aggregators Balance Library & Publisher Needs
This session will explore the challenges faced and strategies implemented by three nonprofit aggregators as they aim to balance the needs of participating libraries and publishers. Speakers from BioOne, Project Euclid, and Project MUSE will each describe their organization's experience balancing stakeholder interests and those strategies, programs, and models that have proven successful. As the product of a library-publisher collaboration, BioOne was designed to meet the needs of both communities—and not one at the expense of the other. Lauren Kane of BioOne will describe the 'economics of equitability', and how the organization has had to continually evolve its business model to support financial sustainability for its library and publisher participants. Project Euclid was developed to advance scholarly communication in mathematics and statistics by supporting the needs of libraries and small, independent publishers. At times, balancing these needs can be challenging, and the partnership has had to adapt and innovate to remain viable. Mira Waller of Project Euclid will highlight a few of these challenges and discuss how the inter-institutional partnership is able to successfully support its stakeholders.

Managed by The Johns Hopkins University Press in collaboration with the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at JHU, Project MUSE is a leading provider of digital humanities and social science content for the scholarly community. Melanie Schaffner of Project MUSE will discuss the benefits of MUSE’s collaborative structure, as well as practical lessons learned in balancing the needs of participating libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide.

We anticipate this being a discussion-oriented, interactive session, with ample time available for Q&A. Whether audience members come from the library, publisher, or researcher communities, the objective of this session is to share practical strategies for balancing stakeholder needs from which all attendees may benefit.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Kane

Lauren Kane

Senior Director, Publishing & Administration, BioOne
Lauren Kane serves as Senior Director, Publishing and Administration for BioOne (bioone.org). In this role, Lauren is responsible for publisher and partner relations, helping BioOne’s more than 135 participating societies, museums, and independent presses maximize their publications’ reach and impact. In addition, she oversees BioOne’s sales team, fostering models that increase library collaboration and researcher access... Read More →
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Melanie Schaffner

Director of Sales and Marketing, Project MUSE
Melanie Schaffner joined Project MUSE® in 1996 and currently serves as Director, Sales and Marketing. Her primary responsibilities include managing global sales and outreach activities, developing business models and a comprehensive marketing strategy for MUSE’s various product lines, contributing to product development plans, and overseeing MUSE’s presence at a variety of library, scholarly, and publishing meetings worldwide... Read More →
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Director of Publishing Services, Project Euclid
As the Director of Publishing Services, Mira Waller is responsible for the administration and growth of Project Euclid. She builds relationships with publishers, scholars, and librarians, oversees finances, and coordinates outreach, sales, and promotional efforts for Project Euclid. Project Euclid, a not-for-profit platform and community, is designed to meet the specific needs of the mathematics and statistics communities, and focused on... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Winter

Elizabeth Winter

Head, Collection Acq & Mgmt / eResources, Georgia Tech Library
eResources, restructuring technical services, how academic libraries can remain relevant in the 21st century


Thursday November 6, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Are We There Yet? A Longitudinal Study of the Student E-Book Experience
Academic libraries continue to increase e-book holdings, but what do our users think of them? Are they eagerly embracing e-books, slowly getting more comfortable with them, or only reluctantly using them when necessary? How can we enhance the value of these collections for our users?At the 2012 Charleston Conference, the CTW Library Consortium (Connecticut College, Trinity College, and Wesleyan University) presented the results of a 2011 ethnographic study of students using e-books. To monitor changes over time, Wesleyan has repeated this study annually, and we are currently gathering our fourth year of data. We also implemented a campus-wide survey of undergraduates to supplement our qualitative findings with quantitative data. While some findings have remained consistent, we have found interesting changes and shifting trends. More students are aware of and have used e-books, but that has not translated into increased sophistication of use. When we started our study, students were approaching e-books analogously to print books; now they tend to approach e-books more as they do online journal articles, which has affected what they expect to be able to do with e-books. Most students still start our interviews with a strong preference for print books over e-books, but that gap narrows significantly by the end of our sessions, indicating that a guided use of e-books would likely enhance their experience of and ability to use e-books. We will discuss how our findings have assisted our efforts to market our e-book collection, develop effective instruction strategies on using e-books, make appropriate selections from available alternatives, and inform vendors of our users’ needs and preferences. Since the application of these findings is context-specific, we will invite the audience to share their experiences and hypothesize how these findings might apply in their situations.

Speakers
avatar for Kendall Hobbs

Kendall Hobbs

Interim Head of Reference, Wesleyan University
Kendall Hobbs is currently Interim Head of Reference at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. He has been a Reference and Instruction Librarian at Wesleyan since 1997. He has a BA in philosophy from Vanderbilt University, an MA in philosophy from Emory University, and an MLS from SUNY Buffalo.
avatar for Diane Klare

Diane Klare

Head of Reference Services, Wesleyan University
Diane Klare is Head of Reference Services/Interim Manager of Technical Services at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. She joined Wesleyan in 2002 and has served as Head of Reference services since 2006. From 2014 until 2016, she held the position of Interim University Librarian. Diane has a BA in French and a MBA in international business from the University of Connecticut, an MLS from Southern Connecticut State University, and a CAS... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Building a Shared Print Repository – Managing a Shared Collection
Print collections continue to grow for most research libraries in North America. This growth, coupled with limited capacity for housing physical collections on central campus, has led many libraries to consider high-density storage. Georgia Tech and Emory have committed to building a high-density storage facility, which will initially house 2 million circulating and special collections materials for both Tech and Emory. The new facility will hold low use material for Emory and for Tech it will serve as the primary physical collection repository, as Tech rethinks the role of the library on its central campus. As the facility is under construction, the libraries are also developing strategies for a shared electronic collection and for providing our users unmediated access to our collections.

Panel Presentation and Discussion: We will dedicate our session to a panel of managers from the two libraries, who will talk about how we planned for the facility and how we are developing policies and services. We will talk about our differing motivations for sharing a high-density print repository and how we have aligned our efforts in two areas: First, the development of key policies (ownership, duplication, FDLP obligations, and preservation); second, the creation of service models for facility operations and users (unmediated discovery and requesting of each other's collection and delivery)

Outcomes: Through panel presentations and discussion participants will learn how mangers at Tech and Emory have developed plans for a shared physical collection in a common repository and how we are thinking about services for our respective users.

Speakers
JC

Jeff Carrico

Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Access, Georgia Tech
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Lars Meyer

Director, Content Division, Emory University
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Charles Spornick

Director, Services Division, Emory University
I am currently the interim head of the Services Division for the Woodruff Library- Emory's main library.   From 2004 through 2012 I was the head of collection management at Emory; from 1995 through 2004 I was the head of library’s Beck Center.   There he worked with worked with faculty, other libraries, and the campus Information Technology Division ins planning and implementing digitization projects.   My... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Collections are Important; Let’s Assess them Earnestly!
St. John Fisher College's Lavery Library is focused on assessment. One area being examined is the value of library collections (monographs and videos) in supporting the library's mission. Library Acquisitions and Collection Development is in a prime position to contribute to these efforts in effective, efficient ways. Acquisitions' value will be directly aligned with the Library's strategic goals and outcomes, which have been designed to support the College's strategic goals. Our purchase on demand program began in 2009 with the installation of the GIST software which runs off of ILLiad. We capitalize on the value added service provided by GIST to capture data from the patron at the point of request, which we use to analyze and assess how Lavery Library supports student learning through its collections. We are enhancing the material request transaction to align with the assessment of our collection and Acquisitions' impact on student learning and critical thinking skills.

Attendees will learn how Lavery's purchase on demand initiative goes against trends toward automating the process. Using a case of study of ILL Loan requests, the presenter seeks to demonstrate that the benefits of providing unique assessment data outweigh the time spent in reviewing requests. This session will offer the potential for assessing the value of a Library's collections from POD, just one prong in our collection development plan. We still have a responsibility for building and curating collections and we need to find innovative ways to connect users to the collections and resources we have. The audience will engage with one another to discuss Acquisitions' role in:
  • assessing library collections;
  • assessing library services;
  • assessing learning, as mapped to ACRL information literacy standards;
  • as well as strategies for scaling to various sized libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Ross

Kate Ross

Head of Technical Services, St. John Fisher College
Collections. Assessment. Food. Country music.


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

2:15pm

Deploying Mendeley to Support Research Collaboration
IFPRI Case Study

Since the inception and initial release in 2008, Mendeley has been acclaimed as the fastest growing, easy to use, free reference managers and academic social network in the world with more than 3 million users today. Join this session to get an insider's look at how different university librarians are supporting their researchers with Mendeley as a reference manager and as an on-ramp to social collaboration. This session will feature case studies from around the world as well as lessons learned and practical resources required.

Speakers
JC

Jennifer Chang

Mendeley Commercial Director, Elsevier
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering. She also offers workshops and consultation to all students and faculty on campus on citation management tools and research databases. She is the Stanford University... Read More →
avatar for Indira Yerramareddy

Indira Yerramareddy

Information and Knowledge Management Specialist, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Indira has a Master's degree in Food Science and Nutrition from Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India. | Her work at IFPRI focuses on data analytics, developing solutions to organize, preserve, manage, and disseminate IFPRI research. Through different resource portals and with the use of content management systems and data management tools, she contributes in expanding the reach and use of IFPRI research. | She trains and supports... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Developing a Digital-First Ebook Program
A little background: When we researched the STM ebook publishing landscape, we saw that it was dominated by disjointed chapter-level PDFs. These were effectively print books online, largely lacking even basic enhancements that electronic delivery allows, such as color or cross-linking. We saw a clear opportunity to launch a digitally-focused book program, offering authors and readers the true benefits of digital book publishing. Our ebooks were a major discussion point at six Library Advisory Board meetings, held worldwide, and the advice we received from librarians played an integral part in the development of the program, from content to delivery.

Description of the session: An inside look at how a society publisher developed and launched an innovative ebooks program.

Objective of the session: To bring librarians behind-the-scenes of a major product launch which was molded and designed based on feedback from the library community. Ways of including the audience: A question and answer session would be included where we would provide honest answers to even the most difficult questions.What attendees can expect to learn: We will not be aiming to sell or promote our ebooks in any way during this session. The intention is for us to give attendees a look into the process a publisher undertakes when developing a major new product. Librarians don’t often have the opportunity to learn about business strategy, research and development, successes and failures from a publisher’s perspective. This session aims to bring publishers, vendors and librarians together by reviewing how each plays a role in creating new products for the marketplace.

Speakers
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Olaf Ernst

Commercial Director, IOP Publishing
avatar for Scott Warren

Scott Warren

Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship, Syracuse University
Scott is the Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship at the Syracuse University Libraries. He provides strategic guidance for collection management, scholarly communication, and subject liaison librarian services. The department he leads plays a pivotal role in enhancing research, teaching and learning at Syracuse University. His progressively more responsible positions have included Head of Collections at SU Libraries and Associate... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

2:15pm

Engrossed, Enraged, Engaged: Empowering Faculty in Transforming Scholarly Communication
Librarians are deeply invested in the scholarly publishing lifecycle. This investment, in tandem with an evolving scholarly communication system, has encouraged librarians to become advocates for transformation in this landscape. At the same time, some faculty have been slower to understand both the complexities of the current system and its evolution. At our university, traditional communication methods weren’t sufficient to meaningfully engage faculty in these evolving trends. As a response, several librarians designed and co-facilitated two scholarly communication Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) for two academic years. These FLCs have been the most successful method of increasing faculty understanding about publishing issues.

The FLCs brought together university community members comprised of faculty, staff, and graduate students interested in learning more about scholarly communication. Each group spent two semesters doing readings, attending panel presentations, and meeting for seminar-style discussions about current issues and trends in scholarly publishing. Over the course of the year, FLC members became more aware of the nuances in the lifecycle of scholarly publication and learned which scholarly communication issues affected them most. As a result, we saw a rapidly growing understanding about problems inherent in the current system of scholarly publishing, a substantial increase in faculty discussions on scholarly communication, and greater faculty-led advocacy for open access publishing. Additionally, community members appreciated the cross-disciplinary nature of the FLC, which afforded them the opportunity to escape traditional disciplinary silos. This presentation will discuss how we used the learning community format to successfully change faculty behavior about issues in scholarly communication and how these experiences altered librarian perceptions and improved interactions with faculty. Attendees will leave the presentation with a better understanding of how the learning community model can be applied at their own institution, including some of the challenges and rewards of implementing such a model.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Bazeley

Jennifer Bazeley

Interim Head, Tech Services, Miami University Libraries
Jennifer Bazeley has a BM and an MM in viola performance from the Eastman School of Music and an MLIS from Dominican University in Illinois. Her love of serials and electronic resources started with a student job in the DePaul University Library in Chicago, IL. Since completing her MLIS in 2004, Jennifer has worked in technical services in the library at the Field Museum in Chicago, the Mason Public Library in Ohio, and the library at the... Read More →
avatar for Jen Waller

Jen Waller

Open Educational Resources & Scholarly Communication Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Libraries Leading the Way on the ‘Textbook Problem’
Escalating textbook costs and continually evolving technologies for delivering course content have combined to place the ‘textbook problem’ at a boiling point ripe for systemic change. The long-term evolution of systems for delivering course materials will be shaped by a complex mix of economic, political, pedagogical, and technological factors along with a diverse set of players including faculty, publishers, open educational resource providers, central information technology, and librarians. The immediate problem facing academic libraries of all types is what, if anything, they can or should do about textbooks. While academic libraries do not exert central authority or market power to drive solutions, they do have both physical centrality on campus and important visibility and goodwill in the academy. Further, there are strategies available for librarians to move the needle from problem to affordability, access, and piloting new spaces to incubate change. Attendees will learn that by employing a mix of collections-centric and scholarly communication focused strategies, academic libraries can save students and their families money in the short-term, while empowering faculty to make more pedagogically-rich materials and facilitating long-term, systemic change in the textbook marketplace.

The goals of this session are to:

1) Provide ideas for academic libraries to help with the textbook affordability problem.
2) Give examples of specific strategies and partnerships that libraries are employing to facilitate wider access to high quality textbooks while reducing costs.
3) Discuss the role of the library as a campus leader, educating faculty on new textbook models and investigating and providing incentives to incubate change.

Speakers
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Brendan O'Connell

Brendan O'Connell

Instructional Technology Librarian, Smith College Libraries
I am Instructional Technology Librarian at Smith College Libraries, where I contribute to a variety of emerging projects. I am acutely interested in what academic libraries mean in the liberal arts context. | | Before this, I was a Library Fellow at North Carolina State University Libraries, where I contributed to launching the NCSU Libraries Alt-Textbook Project , designing the D.H. Hill Library Makerspace, and collaborating with faculty on... Read More →
avatar for Charlotte Roh

Charlotte Roh

Scholarly Communications Resident Librarian, UMass Amherst


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Library of Congress Recommended Format Specifications
To build its extensive collection and to ensure that it will be available for successive generations requires that the Library of Congress identify and acquire those formats which are suitable for large-scale acquisition and preservation for long-term access. To help with this, the Library has created and issued its Recommended Format Specifications in order to inform its own staff and external stakeholders on the physical and technical characteristics of creative works which encourage preservation and long-term access. This presentation will discuss the reasons we created the specifications as we did, the way in which they were developed and how the Library intends to use them to help in its mission to build its unparalleled collection. Just as importantly, this session will share with the audience how the Library feels it will be of use to them as well. Because of the dynamic, ever-changing nature and availability of formats, the Library plans to revisit the specifications annually. Reviewing the specifications annually will permit the Library to keep pace with developments in the creative world, so that changes to the Format Specifications, although made frequently, can be made in small increments. The Library intends that the specifications will be part of an ongoing dialogue with stakeholders from across the spectrum, from creators to distributors to libraries, in making them as accurate and useful as possible for as many of those interested parties it can. One of the key aims of this session will be to engage the audience on this point and to obtain their thoughts and feedback on two of the most crucial concerns of anyone involved with creative works, preservation and long-term access.

Speakers
avatar for Donna Scanlon

Donna Scanlon

Electronic Resources Coordinator/Librarian, Library of Congress
Library of Congress


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Moving Librarian Collecting from Good to Great: Results from the First Year of a Library Liaison Collaborative Monograph Purchasing Project
As Collins (2001) found in his evaluation of how companies make the transition from good to great, one of the key components to this transition was to focus less on continuing tasks, and more on NOT continuing tasks. Today’s librarians are juggling instruction, reference, collection development, outreach, and the need to develop new expertise in emerging areas, such as data curation. At the same time, materials budgets are overwhelmingly becoming devoted to subscription resources and digital collections. Librarians can’t responsibly continue all of our traditional tasks with these shifting budget priorities and new responsibilities. Librarians need to rethink traditional methods of monograph acquisition by individual subject librarians in order to find sustainable and flexible approaches to selection, reduce duplication of efforts, align collecting practices with budget priorities, and better meet cross-disciplinary campus needs.

This session will document the experience of a cluster of allied health librarians collapsing 5 siloed fund lines to collaboratively collect monographs from a single budget line. Attendees will learn about the impact of the workload change on acquisitions staff, collection management, and allied health librarians over the course of the fiscal year. Results will include our preliminary analysis of the 2012-2013 individual purchasing year as compared with the 2013-2014 collapsed pilot-year. Comparisons will include examining the distribution of purchases across LC subject classes and funds as contrasted with campus enrollment, institutional priorities, and new programs. Discussion regarding opportunities and challenges related to this method, current and future assessment points, and next steps will engage the audience in contemplating how we as a profession we will define success with this interdisciplinary acquisitions model.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Mungin

Michael Mungin

Psychology Librarian, James Madison University
avatar for Genya O'Gara

Genya O'Gara

VIVA Associate Director, VIVA - The Virtual Library of Virginia
Genya O’Gara is the Associate Director of the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA), a consortium of 72 nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia. Genya received her Master’s in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has held previous positions in Collection Management and Special Collections at North Carolina State University, most recently serving as the Director of Collections at James... Read More →
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Lara Sapp

Health Sciences & Kinesiology Librarian, James Madison University
avatar for Carolyn Schubert

Carolyn Schubert

Health Sciences & Nursing Librarian, James Madison University


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

One System, Different Expectations: The User at the Center of Discovery
Users come to the library for many different reasons. They may want to find a quick overview of a specific topic, to check out the newest articles in a particular area, to search for material for a course assignment or a research project, or simply to obtain access to a specific book or article. One of the challenges for a library and their discovery system is to accommodate users at any academic level who are seeking information in any subject area or across multiple subject areas as cross-disciplinary studies increase. At the same time, libraries need to make sure that their local collections are well presented and accessible. In 2014, Harvard University Library and Ex Libris embarked on a user study to evaluate core usage scenarios for scholarly material and users’ expectations from a library and its discovery system. The first part of the project consisted of the collection of information such as detailed usage scenarios and feedback from a variety of stakeholders, followed by a multi-institution workshop to expand the scenarios with experiences from other types of institutions. The results will serve to create personas and common usage themes and scenarios that can then be used to optimize aspects of the discovery system, such as relevance ranking and custom search tools.After presenting the methods and results of the study, we will provide attendees with a platform for discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Morse

Laura Morse

Director, Library Systems, Harvard University
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Christine Stohn

Senor Product Manager, Discovery & Delivery, Ex Libris
Christine Stohn is a senior product manager in the Discovery and Delivery business unit at Ex Libris, including Primo and bX. Christine has over 20 years of experience in the library industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. Christine holds a degree in library sciences from the Free University in Berlin and an information systems degree from the Open University in the UK.


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Out of the Basement: Impact of Video on New Library Resources and Library Collections and Services
Slides from Eileen Lawrence

Recently, libraries have seen a vast increase of video products as many new journals and information resources now contain extensive video.  Video today is powerful and effective utilizing communication techniques that resonate widely because of its visual appeal, action and ability to retain attention.  Video is increasingly represented in library collections where primary sources and video elements are being combined in a single product.

The impact of video on library collections has been far reaching as new generations of readers and users find this medium instructive and scholarly complimenting the traditional text-based materials and libraries promote their value.  Video allows for reinforced instruction with supports for multiple learning styles/needs, enhancing the role of primary sources, easy access, ability to replay, supplements other information resources, and is increasingly popular with more spontaneous viewing options.  Information providers are utilizing filming techniques that capture real time, relevant locations and content from multiple sources. 

Library collections are expanding to respond to user preferences, link content in different formats, promote interdisciplinarity, demonstrate a new form of relevance and integrate traditional print with multimedia.  This accommodation in library collections guides future development that bridges the edutainment aspect of learning with a more entertainment preferred context and accompanying library services such as streaming.  The multimedia innovation that is entering the information marketplace makes these new resources value enriched in multiple ways making sense of complex issues with experts in the field.  Libraries are engaged in the production of scholarship by faculty and students and video is an active element. This presentation will concentrate on the library decision-making factors and introduce the expanding product lines of JoVE, IdeasRoadshow, and Alexander Street Press. These publishers provide more symmetry for conversation, discussion and response to information and offer perspective and insights on how their products are changing scholarly publishing and thus the landscape of library collections.  

Speakers
avatar for Howard Burton

Howard Burton

Host and CEO, Ideas Roadshow/Open Agenda Publishing
Howard Burton, the founding Executive Director of Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, has extensive experience in communicating sophisticated ideas to students and to the general public. He holds a PhD in theoretical physics and an MA in philosophy. | | Since Ideas Roadshow's first season in 2013, Howard has had in-depth conversations with about 75 of the most celebrated scientists, researchers, authors and... Read More →
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Michael Fusco

Deputy Dir, Library Relations, JoVE
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies to promote better, more sustainable and more affordable online access best described as new potential in scholarly communication practices.  
avatar for Eileen Lawrence

Eileen Lawrence

Senior Vice President, Alexander Street Press
Eileen has worked with academic libraries since 1980. She is a co-founder of Alexander Street Press, having served previously as Vice President of Sales at Chadwyck-Healey, Inc.  She created and works with Alexander Street’s sales teams globally, manages key customer relationships, and has worked with regional and national consortia around the world. Eileen received a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from the University of... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Resource Discovery in the Age of Wikipedia: How Libraries Can Expose their Collections on the World's Most Visited Reference Site
Students use Wikipedia ubiquitously as their starting point for research.  Increasingly librarians have also come to grasp Wikipedia's importance as a way for libraries to make their collections discoverable where readers already are.  These trends coalesced in The Wikipedia Library, a nonprofit project that pairs top reference publishers with experienced Wikipedia editors through mutually beneficial donations.  Editors are given free access and set loose to add high-quality citations on Wikipedia's massively trafficked article pages.  Oxford University Press and JSTOR, among others, have joined up with the Wikipedia Library and seen their external links from the encyclopedia increase dramatically.  OCLC further partnered with The Wikipedia Library to develop a script based on their KnowledgeBase API which will help complete the circle of research and dissemination:  the tool allows institutionally-affiliated readers to click directly from Wikipedia article references to their own university's holdings. The ultimate goal is to help libraries and publishers reach readers, and for Wikipedia to become the starting point for research but not the end point!

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Earley

Patrick Earley

Community Advocate, The Wikimedia Foundation
I'm a Community Advocate for the Wikimedia Foundation (the non-profit that hosts the Wikipedia websites), and a long-time Wikipedia editor. I have worked extensively with the Wikipedia/academia/library interface, assisting instructors in the Wikimedia Education Program as an “online ambassador” and coordinating the Wikipedia Library with Jake Orlowitz. The Wikipedia Library is an effort to get reliable source access to Wikipedia editors... Read More →
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Cris Ferguson

Director of Technical Services, Murray State University
avatar for Suzanne Saskia Kemperman

Suzanne Saskia Kemperman

Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations, OCLC, Director, Business Development and Publisher Relations
Suzanne Kemperman is the Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations at OCLC. She is responsible for OCLC's content acquisition strategy and partnerships with content providers to enhance content discovery and access. She has worked for 30 years in the publishing and information industry in Europe and the United States, including STM, academic and educational publishing. Suzanne began working in electronic publishing at Springer in... Read More →
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Damon Zucca

Oxford University Press Reference, Oxford University Press
Damon Zucca is Publisher of Scholarly and Online Reference at Oxford University Press, where he oversees the planning and development of a range of print and digital publishing initiatives, including Oxford Biblical Studies, Oxford Bibliographies, and Oxford Handbooks Online. He has been working in scholarly book publishing for fifteen years as an editor at Garland Publishing, Routledge, and Peter Lang before coming to OUP.


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Shotgun Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have approximately 10 minutes at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all 5 sessions. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) "Project Rescue" - Preserving and Invigorating Contents on Microfilm Collection
Ying Zhang, Acquisitions Librarian, University of Central Florida

Despite the prevalence of electronic resources nowadays, microfilms remain significant part of the collections for research libraries. Although the use is more cumbersome, microfilm format often offer the unique content for particularly primary and historical research. Because they are expensive to own, microfilms are also highly requested through interlibrary loans. However, over time, the earlier acetate films are subject to “vinegar syndrome” and deteriorating rapidly. Once this nasty degradation syndrome appears, an offensive odor is emitted to the environment and to “infect” other microfilms. And eventually the microfilm is unusable and its contents become lost. The traditional preservation techniques or acquiring actual replacement reels are both cost prohibitive.In an effort to slow down the spread of vinegar syndrome and preserve the collection, the University of Central Florida Libraries took on a “project rescue” for microfilms.The overall process and detailed workflow will be demonstrated in this presentation. The audience is expected to learn UCF's cost-effective and collaborative methods to preserve microfilms' health and optimize the access while minimizing the content loss to the users.

2) A Research Commons on a Shoestring: Opportunities, Improvisations, and Pitfalls
Bruce Pencek
, Collegiate Librarian for Social Science & History, Virginia Tech Libraries

In recent years the Virginia Tech Libraries have dramatically expanded the scope of their operations and services, from enhancing undergraduate learning spaces to investing heavily in human and technological support for knowledge creation and scholarly communication. But entrepreneurial spirits have flowed more copiously than funding. Our account of the library's digital research commons begins in that context and traces the evolution of “Port” as a bottom-up project that empirically tested the innovator's proposition: “if you build it, they will come.” Though presented in the first person, the story of Port can inform the decisions in other libraries that can commit only limited resources to creating new services and facilities. Our presentation offers several salient points of departure for discussions with and among members of the audience. These include our assessment of the fitness-to-purpose of resources at hand; our visions of the possible and desirable deliverables over the short-, medium-, and long term; our pursuit of resources (in-kind, financial, and – later than we should have – human) and of partners (in and out of the library); our incremental process for improving Port's functionality; and our ongoing review of the successes and shortcomings of Port vis-à-vis our intended clientele -- and of ourselves as visionaries, promoters, and managers.

3) Wilde about Weeding: An Earnest Effort in Collection Development
Melissa Johnson
, Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Georgia Reagents University

In an effort to create more student space, provide ease of access to resources, and strengthen their collection, a medium sized academic library undertook a major weeding project in 2014. Since it was important to get immediate results in removing items from the collection, the print serials section was the first area selected for weeding. Through a step by step process that involved all members of the library staff, items were evaluated on electronic availability, availability at the other university libraries, the content, the condition, and the length of run. Using previous case studies and research as guidelines, the presenter will discuss “the importance of being earnest” in making de-selection decisions.

4) Grounded: Liberal Arts College Experience in E-Book Consortial Demand Driven Acquisition
Raik Zaghloul
, Head of Collection Development, Union College

Libraries responded to the challenge of managing eBook acquisition by extending the print model to ebooks and by borrowing liberally from business models and practices. The results have been mixed. The presentation will share lessons learned in the first two years of a small liberal arts college experience with consortial on-demand ebook acquisition. The emphasis will be on the College's users' experience and the scope and nature of content offered by publishers.

5) Collection Development for Changing Times
MaryLaskowski and Jennifer Maddox Abbott,
 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

This Shotgun Session will take a retrospective look at collection development from the early days of the Library to today, including the use of formal collection development policies to guide decision making, and how those policies shaped the collection over time. More specifically, this presentation will look at the original emphasis of collection development at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the breakdown by subject area, and how that compared to campus-wide expenditures in the various subject areas. The original goal of quickly increasing the volume of material the library held created serious space concerns, and although many collection milestones were celebrated along the way, including the acquisition of the 13th million volume in 2012, it was clear that the emphasis in collecting needed to change. This session will show how the primary focus shifted from simply acquiring a mass volume of materials to issues of discoverability and access for users. Several of the major shifts in philosophy and practice in collection development policies that will be discussed in more detail include the availability of high-density storage facilities that reduce space and growth concerns, a shift towards electronic access, Shared Print Repositories, a trend towards shared access rather than locally owned content, and a local focus on unique print resources while building cooperative arrangements for access to aggregated collections and data. Participants will see where collection development philosophy and policies have taken the Library in the past, as well as looking at how they will shape the Library of the future.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Maddox Abbott

Jennifer Maddox Abbott

Technical Services Project Coordinator, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Melissa E. Johnson

Melissa E. Johnson

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Augusta University
Melissa Johnson is the Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian at the Summerville Campus of Augusta University. She is the liaison librarian to the Departments of English and Foreign Languages, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, and Mathematics. She is active in NASIG, ALA, GLA, SELA, and the CSRA-LA. She earned her B.A. in English from Augusta State University and her MLIS from Valdosta State University. She is currently working on a MA in... Read More →
avatar for Mary Laskowski

Mary Laskowski

Head, Collection Management Services, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Bruce Pencek

Bruce Pencek

College Librarian for Social Science & History, Virginia Tech Libraries
A lapsed political science professor, Pencek often collaborates with teaching faculty on topics relating to information literacy and assessment within disciplines, presenting in both disciplinary and library venues.  With an eye toward cultivating a new academic field, he was a founding partner in creating the annual Veterans in Society research/engagement conferences and co-directed a 2016 NEH summer institute for college faculty, "Veterans... Read More →
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Raik Zaghloul

Head of Collection Development, Union college
YZ

Ying Zhang

Acquisitions Librarian, University of Central Florida
Univ. of Central Florida


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Taming the Wilde: Collaborating with Expertise for Faster, Better, Smarter Collection Analysis
The importance of collection assessment and evaluation has been a hot topic due to increasing budget restrictions and the need to prove worth to stakeholders through greater evidence-based evaluations. These types of collection assessments include more robust analyses including holdings percentages compared to ILL requests and gap analyses by subject areas. While the library community embraces these assessments, less thought has been given to how to best conduct this research and get the cleanest data to tell the right story. The data to do these types of analyses often reside in complex infrastructures not fully understood by the collection managers or subject librarians. They can exist in highly complex web-environments as well as multiple systems. The University of Houston Libraries embarked on a large-scale gap analysis of the collection by subject area. The team developed a research matrix, input/output variables, and an analytical plan to guide the research but the key component to success was quickly, accurately, and properly mining the data sources such as Sierra and the Electronic Resource Management system. To do this, the team worked collaboratively with the Electronic Resources Department.

The objective of the session is to outline both the methodology of the research and how each stepped mapped to collaboration with experts who work daily within the systems housing the data . Our collection team contends that collaboration with expertise led to far more accurate and expedient data collection and analyses. It also allowed the team to more quickly develop complete and accurate datasets, that would not have been possible without collaboration.

The presentation will include variable list development, data collection steps, initial struggles, and cleaning and interpretation of the data through collaborative efforts. Findings will be presented through graphs and robust holdings and ILL ratio analyses.

Speakers
avatar for Jackie Bronicki

Jackie Bronicki

Assessment & Statistics, University of Houston
University of Houston
avatar for Cherie Turner

Cherie Turner

Chemical Sciences Librarian, University of Houston
Cherie Turner is the Chemical Sciences Librarian at the University of Houston.
avatar for Shawn Vaillancourt

Shawn Vaillancourt

Education Librarian, University of Houston
Shawn Vaillancourt is the Education Librarian at the University of Houston.
FY

Frederick Young

Systems Analyst, University of Houston


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

The Haves and Have Nots: Sophisticated Cross Institutional Analysis Techniques that Support Budget Justifications
Universities face fiscal crises and pressures to operate more efficiently. Many are adopting budgeting models, like Responsibility Center Management (RCM), or concepts borrowed from business, like Return on Investment. Accordingly, libraries are pressured to justify their budgets, including among other things funding to cover increasing materials costs, and must make the most persuasive and defendable arguments possible. In 2011, the University of Florida (UF) adopted RCM budgeting and financial management. The UF libraries entered RCM chronically under-funded and facing escalating materials costs. RCM was implemented at a time of severe university budget reductions, including steep cuts in state appropriations. The libraries had to develop effective methods for communicating its budget circumstances and what appropriate funding levels should be in order to adequately serve faculty, students and researchers.

The libraries have engaged in an ongoing analysis of how the resources of the libraries and the demands of the university compare to peer institutions using data from Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and ARL Statistics. The data reflecting measures for library resources and university characteristics which influence the demand for library materials and services has been interpreted using numerous approaches including linear regression (with results with high correlation coefficients) and other statistical approaches. Through this process, we have provided stark evidence (and a compelling message) that there is a considerable and statistically significant gap between the scale of UF programs and populations and the resources of the library system which reflects a funding issue with negative impacts on the university community.

Attendees will be introduced to innovative analysis techniques which allow for a rationale examination of the comparability of library funding across institutions. These methodologies will be explained so that they can be readily adopted or expanded upon at the attendee's institution. Please reference http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003851 for examples of the analyses.

Speakers
BW

Brian W. Keith

Associate Dean for Administrative Services & Faculty Affairs George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Brian is the senior administrator for the areas of Human Resources, Staff Development, Grants Management, Facilities and Security, and Finance and Accounting for the Smathers Libraries.  This system includes 405 employees and annual funding in excess of 34 million dollars.  Functions under his direction include recruitment for all library positions; employee relations; compensation plan design and administration; performance management... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Two Years In and We Are Still Head Over Heels About Our Head in the Clouds: 100% PDA and No Approval Plan

 How we up-ended collection development and acquisitions: In 2012 Bucknell University eliminated its approval plan and moved to a "single-stream" entirely patron-driven model for monographs, both print and electronic.  During our presentation last year, we talked about the impact on acquisitions and the huge savings we immediately realized.  Now that we've been PDA for two years, we are even more committed to this model!  We will provide updated statistics and discuss the impact on technical services staffing and interlibrary loan.  We'll also talk about the addition of an e-book DDA plan that is proving hugely successful.  

We love it, and most importantly, our users love it.

Attendees will hear how we did it, why cloud services like OCLC WorldShare are essential, how it is working, and why we believe this is a very likely future for most libraries.  We hope there will be lively discussion about what this means for the future of collection development and as well how one begins conversations like this with faculty and other stakeholders.  Let’s debate why buying things "just in case" just cannot be justified anymore and more so, how this might actually help evolve rather than hurt scholarly publishing in the long term.


Speakers
JC

Jennifer Clarke

Director, Collection Development and Access Services, Bucknell University
Jennifer Clarke has worked in many leadership positions at the Bertrand Library since March 1989. She's currently the Director for Collection Development and Access Services, which at Bucknell entails leadership for Acquisitions, Cataloging, Circulation, Collection Development, E-Resource Management, Interlibrary Loan, and Serials departments. In addition to implementing WorldShare two years ago, her most recent accomplishments include working... Read More →
avatar for Dan Heuer

Dan Heuer

Head of Discovery and Access Services, Bucknell University
Dan began working at the Bertrand Library in 2009 after finishing his M.A. in American Literature from Bucknell University. He also holds a B.S. in geology and has filled all requirements for a B.A. in Spanish from Bucknell. Dan began his library career in interlibrary loan and has taken on more responsibilities as the years have progressed. He now serves as Head of Discovery and Access Services. Dan is responsible for the full life-cycle of... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Parkview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

University Presses and Libraries: An 80/20 Rule?
In recent years, there has been a growing tendency for university presses to report to libraries. Currently, about 20% of presses report to the library at their institutions. When did this trend begin, and why? Does this shift signal an increased awareness of the need for presses and libraries to partner to accomplish common goals? What do libraries and presses have to offer one another—and what, jointly, can they more effectively provide to their communities and constituents? As background, data that probe these and related questions will be shared. This session will then suggest a range of possible objectives for establishing a press-library reporting relationship. It will explore the benefits of close collaboration between these two campus units. It also will examine what such reporting relationships might mean within the broader scholarly communication ecosystem. As a case study, the presenters—a university press director and an associate university librarian—will share their own experience working within a press-library reporting structure; they also will offer an approach for developing criteria to assess the success of such a framework. Finally, they will invite session participants to contribute their own perspectives on the value of library-press relationships and will facilitate a practical and theoretical discussion on this subject.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Bunker

Jane Bunker

Director, Northwestern University Press
Jane Bunker is the Director of Northwestern University Press. Prior to that, she was associate director and editor in chief at SUNY Press, where she also acquired books in philosophy, psychology, and women’s studies. She earned her B.A. at St. Norbert College, and M.A. at Fordham University, where her publishing career began as a graduate student working on the journal International Philosophical Quarterly. Long active in the Association of... Read More →
MR

Marianne Ryan

Associate University Librarian, User Strategies, Northwestern University Libraries


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Which Data Quality is Needed and Affordable?
Library consortia or networks are the driver of shared cataloging in Germany. The federated system of six regional consortia which has been in operation for many years is highly sophisticated and professional. As members of these networks, libraries are allowed to align or to adjust the bibliographic records in their regional databases. Good library skills and big technical efforts are needed in order to maintain a high level of data quality. Combining Ex Libris' ALMA and OCLC's WMS will require the German library networks to change completely. The databases of the six library networks will move or may even vanish in the next generation systems. World-Cat will be primary for cataloging which is new for German libraries. Obviously, our librarians are wondering whether World-Cat will meet their demands and needs. For ALMA users Ex Libris is offering a “network zone”, which will hopefully transmit the German network philosophy into the ALMA cloud. But the opportunities of shared cataloguing between the both platforms will be reduced. Is this cooperation with World-Cat the best approach for us all, especially for the ALMA-Libraries? Are the cataloguing procedures of World-Cat really suitable for the German libraries? Which cataloging requirements and which quality levels are acceptable and necessary from the librarians' perspective? These and many other questions are have to be dealt with in the interest of further transatlantic cooperation.

Speakers
avatar for Andreas Degkwitz

Andreas Degkwitz

Director of the University Library, Humboldt University
Dr. Andreas Degkwitz (born 1956 in Frankfurt/Main) is the Chief Librarian of the Humboldt University of Berlin and honorary professor for information science of Potsdam University for Applied Sciences. From 2004 until September 2011 he was the Chief-Information-Officer of the Brandenburg Technical University of Cottbus. The university combined the central services for information, communication and media (library, computer-services, learning... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Cooperative Collection Development Requires Access: SALToC -- A Low-Tech, High-Value Distributed Online Project for Article-Level Discovery in Print-Only Journals
The countries of South Asia publish a broad range of journals of importance for research in the languages of the region. These are an essential component of interdisciplinary area studies collections at research libraries but are, by definition, low-use "obscure" materials. It makes sense for librarians who select them to broaden these collections, reduce duplication nationally, and enable shared access to them. The challenge is lack of article-level discoverability of these journals: they are print-only, typically not covered in online indexing/abstracting services. If users cannot discover these articles (except via physical browsing), then how can cooperating libraries share them, and distribute responsibility for collecting them, which is essential to coordinated collection development?

The collaborative SALToC project incrementally address this issue by creating simple, centrally-browsable online tables of contents for target journals, through a low-tech, low-cost distributed process that benefits users at all participating libraries. For journals not available online nor included in article databases or print indexes, this kind of discovery facilitates research by finally enabling scholars use previously undiscoverable journal holdings of other libraries: they can now issue interlibrary loan, document delivery, and/or offsite retrieval requests, with full citations for the desired articles. (Many libraries don't lend journals on interlibrary loan, but DO provide article-level document delivery on request, IF the requester has a citation). Coordinated collection development in a given content area (planned reduction of duplication coupled with broader collective coverage) becomes supportable in the research library community only when shared access (and its prerequisite -- discovery) is provided. The South Asian Language Journals Table of Contents (SALToC) project represents a proof-of-concept demonstration of the value of this approach. This paper shows how simple, "grass-roots" distributed efforts can contribute significantly to discoverability of hard to discover resources, thereby making coordinated collection development cost-effective, popular among users, and sustainable.

Speakers
avatar for Aruna P. Magier

Aruna P. Magier

South Asian Studies Librarian, New York University Library
With a PhD (History, Osmania University, India) and an an MLS (Queens College; thesis: Institutional Repositories and Scholarly Communication), Dr. Magier has been NYU's South Asia Librarian since 2008, providing interdisciplinary collection development, faculty liaison, instruction and research support services. For the last 14 years, she has also served as Associate Editor of the online Bibliography of Asian Studies. She is currently engaged in... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

3:15pm

Don't Leave the Faculty at the Station: Introducing Faculty to Collection Development Grants
The College of William and Mary Library offered collection development grants to its teaching faculty in order to supplement their research and teaching. This program also helped the library to fill in some holes in its collections while adding material that was essential to faculty research and curricular needs. This program will show how a new funding opportunity carved out of the material budget was developed to promote the library as well as enhance liaison collaboration with faculty. The panel will discuss the logistics of the grant process, what was gained, and mistakes made in its first year of a new collection development initiative.

This presentation will:

  • Show library subject liaisons to use new ways to develop relationships with faculty by learning their current research methods and helping them develop new courses;

  • Offer collection management and budget managers an alternative for adding flexibility to materials budgets;

  • Demonstrate to public services and outreach librarians a new way to promote the library, its services, and collections. 

An outline of the presentation:

  1. Process of promoting collection grants to faculty. 

  2. Discussion of different ways liaisons collaborated with faculty.

  3. Review of proposals and breakdown of proposals.

  4. Lessons learned.

  5. Budgetary aspect of the program – allocations, types of materials purchased.


Speakers
avatar for Martha Higgins

Martha Higgins

Research Librarian, College of William and Mary
Martha Higgins is a research librarian at the College of William and Mary. She earned her BA and MA in History at the University of Albany, and her MLS from the University of Maryland. She is the liaison to History, Anthropology, Africana Studies, and American Studies.
avatar for Don Welsh

Don Welsh

Head of Research, College of William and Mary
Don Welsh is Head of the Research Department at the College of William and Mary Library. He has worked as a bibliographer and helps coordinate collection development for the library. Don earned a B.A. in Philosophy at the University of South Carolina, an M.S.L.S. at the University of North Carolina, and an M.L.A. degree at Boston University. When he is not working, he is reading, cooking, biking, swimming, traveling, or home brewing.


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Evolution of Mobile Device Use in Clinical Settings
We will present a summary of the findings from Wolters Kluwer Health's updated (2014) market research project focused on how end user workflows and work patterns continue to change and evolve as mobile devices become more common in clinical settings. Specifically, we will contemplate how specific use cases fit with specific devices, the perceived effect of multiple screens on usage, and how different content types are valued from a relative perspective in a mobile environment. After presenting the historical trends that can be pulled from the data, the panel, which includes a hospital librarian, will attempt to forecast how market patterns, clinical users’ demands and behavior can be forecast and aligned.

Moderators
RK

Ramune K. Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library
Longtime health sciences librarian, member of MLA (Medical Library Association), SLA (Special Libraries Association), also regional and state health sciences library organizations. Involved with Charleston Conference as a program director, conference dine-around host, and recruiter/compiler of conference session “And They Were There” reports for “Against the Grain” (ATG). Active in organizing conference's health sciences Lively Lunches... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Hob Brooks

Hob Brooks

Senior Director Business Development, Wolters Kluwer Health
I currently look after all third party content partnerships for Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research. I have previously worked in sales and sales management roles at Thomson Reuters and SAGE Publications.
JC

Jeannine Creazzo

Manager, Library Services, Saint Peter's University Hospital


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

From Silos to (Archives)Space: Moving Legacy Finding Aids Online as a Multi-Department Library Collaboration
Hunter Library’s Special Collections department currently has about 700 findings aids written in MS Word. Since the finding aids do not have an online presence, the discoverability of the library’s special collections materials remains a challenge. Our presentation will focus on the project of transferring these legacy finding aids to ArchivesSpace, a community-developed, open-source archives information management application. Since ArchivesSpace has the ability to publish archival descriptive information on the web, entering our finding aids in it will make these “hidden collections” become findable and accessible to scholars and researchers. We will discuss our workflow model—strengths and steps to overcome challenges. Our presentation will be useful for institutions who are looking to migrate legacy finding aids to ArchivesSpace as well as generate discussion on developing better workflow models that optimize the use of limited resources.Hunter Library at Western Carolina University has recently begun transferring legacy finding aids to ArchivesSpace. To compensate for limited staff time, the project was developed as a collaboration between three of Hunter Library’s departments – Special Collections, Cataloging and Metadata, and Digital Projects. The first step involved creating a working group with a representative from each department. This team divided over 700 finding aids written in MS Word into priority batches, wrote a glossary to explain archival description terms, and created a guide for mapping finding aid information into ArchivesSpace fields. The aim is to use this supporting documentation to train the library’s catalogers in the work of data migration to ArchivesSpace with each cataloger being initially assigned a small collection to work with. Special Collections will be doing the final review before the finding aid is published. With this working plan in place, the library is currently on track to have its 700 finding aids available online within the next twelve months.

Speakers
PB

Paromita Biswas

Metadata Librarian, Western Carolina University, NC
avatar for Elizabeth Skene

Elizabeth Skene

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Western Carolina University


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Parkview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Good Things Come In Small Packages: Getting the Most from Shared Print Retention and Cooperative Collection Development with a Small Group of Libraries
In June 2013, the Central Iowa Collaborative Collections Initiative (CI-CCI), inspired by a Charleston pre-conference on data driven shared print collections, was established. CI-CCI went from being just an idea to a formal, MOU governed organization, in just six months. It is consists of a group of five mid and small central Iowa private academic libraries. Members are Central College, Drake University, Grand View University, Grinnell College, and Simpson College. Unlike other collaborations of this nature, the initial primary focus of the group was identification of titles for retention, as opposed to identification of weeding candidates. Because retention was of major concern to the group, each library did a retention verification project. Each assigned retention title was physically verified on the shelf and marked as a retention title. It is our understanding that this is unique to these types of collaboratives.

The second primary focus of the collaborative is the development of the “shared collection” approach via prospective collection development. The group is about to embark on this phase of the project, and it will be challenging due to the fact that we do not share a common catalog or vendor. Nor do we currently have the same level of interest in ebooks or PDA. The long term intent is to enhance access to scholarly resources and to manage acquisition costs.

Attendees of this session will hear how the collaboration was initiated, what steps were taken to create it, what structures and governance were put in place to support it, and what the next steps will be, including potentially adding on additional members. Further, we will highlight the pros and cons of a small collaboration, both in library size and number of participants, and we will offer tips for initiating a collaboration outside an existing structure.

Speakers
avatar for Cyd Dyer

Cyd Dyer

College Librarian/Archivist, Simpson College
As College Librarian, my goal each day is to connect students and faculty with the information resources and services they require to be successful in their learning and research endeavors. I work closely with the library team and college faculty to make this happen. I also serve as consulting librarian for the divisions of Policy Studies and World Language & Culture Studies. As College Archivist, I preserve documentation and memorabilia from all... Read More →
avatar for Teri Koch

Teri Koch

Head, Collection Management, Drake University
Teri Koch is Head of Collection Development & Professor of Librarianship at Drake University's Cowles Library in Des Moines, Iowa. Teri’s primary responsibilities include oversight of the Collection Development & Management Unit, the Library’s Liaison Program, Budget Administration, and Assessment activities. She was co-founder of the Central Iowa Collaborative Collections Initiative (CI-CCI) in 2013 which brought together five libraries from... Read More →
avatar for Pam Rees

Pam Rees

Director of the Library and Information Resources, Grand View University
Pam Rees holds the position of Director of the library and Information Resources at the Grand View University Library, where she also held several other positions during her long tenure. She is currently a member of the ILA-ACRL Executive Board and is chair of ILA-ACRL’s K-12/Higher Education Ad hoc Committee. She previously chaired the ILA-ACRL Membership Committee and served on the IA-ACRL Spring Conference Planning Committee... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

How Can Libraries, Publishers, and Vendors Work Together to Prevent Abuse?
What to do about http://sci-hub.org/ and other similar sites? They exist solely to illegally distribute subscription content to non-subscribers. The anonymous, unscrupulous people behind these sites search the web for proxy service loopholes which are then exploited to provide free access to all, in violation of subscription / site license agreements. How can librarians tell when their EZProxy service has been compromised? How should publishers communicate with libraries that have insecure access to their proxy services? What can hosting vendors do to help libraries and publishers respond to this kind of abuse?

Moderators
SW

Susan Willner

Major Accounts Manager, HighWire
Major Accounts ManagerHighWire Press, Inc.

Speakers
avatar for Margaret Hogarth, MLIS, MS

Margaret Hogarth, MLIS, MS

Environmental Studies, The Claremont Colleges Library
JH

Jonathan Holiday

Executive Director, International Copyright Enforcement and Trade Policy, AAP
avatar for Sarah McClung

Sarah McClung

Collection Development Librarian, University of California, San Francisco
avatar for Paul Moss

Paul Moss

Product Manager, OCLC
CS

Claire Sinks

Content Licensing Manager, The Journal of Immunology


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

How Does Ebook Adoption Vary By Discipline? What Humanists, Social Scientists and Scientists Say They Want (A LibValue Study)
Collection librarians in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences have had different opportunities for building ebook collections and, as a result, their collections have developed very differently. Ebooks have been more quickly embraced by the sciences, with science publishers offering an array of ebook choices, while the social sciences and humanities have progressed more slowly and with fewer options. In addition, librarians in the humanities have witnessed image copyright issues which can leave ebooks without any illustrations at all. These disciplinary inequalities mean that interdisciplinary scholars often face very different ebook options within the same library. Librarian selectors may intuit that users “don’t want” ebooks, but they may also be giving them few choices. One positive outcome from this “chicken and egg” scenario (users can’t choose ebooks if they aren’t there, and ebooks aren’t there because they don’t choose them) are DDA programs that offer multidisciplinary ebooks to users with a manageable price. The UIUC Library’s ebook DDA pilot was initiated to determine the interest in and use of ebooks by non-traditional users, specifically humanists. In addition to the DDA, a survey was conducted to tease more information from humanities ebook users; the success of the survey and the DDA pilot ( presented at the 2013 Charleston Conference) encouraged researchers to extend the study to the social sciences, and ultimately to scientists. These three separate surveys offer a comparative look at how the three disciplines vary in their perceptions concerning the value and usability of ebooks in their fields. These studies, partially supported by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (via “LibValue,”) specifically examine how a spectrum of scholars adopts ebooks and how they envision a migration to the ebook format. Attendees will gain insight on the ebook perceptions of scholars from each of the three major disciplines.

Speakers
avatar for Tina E Chrzastowski

Tina E Chrzastowski

Head, Access & Delivery Services, Santa Clara University Library
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions: Associate Professor University Libraries, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
JZ

Jean-Louise Zancanella

Public Services Librarian, College of Western Idaho Library


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Auditorium, Science and Mathematics Building (Rm 129) 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Metadata Challenges in Library Discovery Systems
Using discovery systems such as Primo, Summon, and EDS, patrons can search nearly all of their libraries' resources from a single platform. To make this experience possible, data from disparate sources must be normalized and unified into one index. In this session, we will discuss some of the challenges relating to metadata that confront each stakeholder in library discovery: the library, the publisher, and the discovery system provider. Libraries must normalize their bibliographic records to make them compatible with the discovery system’s data structure. Publishers need to create mechanisms to regularly export records with meaningful metadata, and the discovery system provider must integrate metadata from these sources, while ensuring the best possible user experience. We will also review the recent guidelines of the NISO Open Discovery Initiative. The project goals call on the library community “to streamline the process by which information providers, discovery service providers, and librarians work together to better serve libraries and their users.” The session will explore how this aim can be achieved along with some of the challenges and will include time for open discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Pascal Calarco

Pascal Calarco

Associate University Librarian, Research and Digital Discovery Services, University of Waterloo
avatar for Lettie Conrad

Lettie Conrad

Executive Program Manager, Discovery & Product Analysis, SAGE Publishing
Lettie Conrad came to SAGE in 2006 after managing the publications program for a think tank in Washington, DC. As an Executive Manager in SAGE’s Online Products Team, Lettie leads a group of specialists who expand SAGE’s capacity for digital product development innovations. She is instrumental in launching user-centered web and mobile products, driving research and analysis that enable evidence-based product management to maintain... Read More →
RK

Rachel Kessler

Product Manager, Primo Central, Ex Libris Ltd.
MV

Michael Vandenburg

Associate University Librarian, Queens University


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Mobile Access – What the Library Wants: Mobiles as Discovery Enhancers
Library users now expect to be able to access content 24/7 from any location – not just in the library on a computer, but on their mobile phones, tablets, e-readers and other devices. A recent survey carried out by Taylor & Francis found that 78% of respondents rated mobile integration to find resources as important.Laura Horton, Global Library Communications Manager from Taylor & Francis, will demonstrate through the results of a primary research survey how users of Taylor & Francis Mobile are using mobile technologies for their research needs, detailing: their device preferences, the mobile app as a discovery tool, and how users can find accessible content for readability on their mobiles. The talk will also explore mobiles as a medium for enhancing accessibility of content through sharing options available through social media tags on mobile devices. These findings will be complemented with sharing a series of interviews with librarians across the Americas, focussing on innovative mobile strategies they have implemented in their libraries.

Dr. Laura Katz Rizzo, from Temple University, will present a practical case study of mobile engagement in the library. She will speak to the mobile library’s use not only in helping students to complete their own research assignments for required courses, but also how information literacy is a key Goal in Temple’s General Education courses and how she developed the course design for her World Studies course to encourage both information literacy and critical thinking on the part of students. Lastly, she will speak to the role of social media and mobile access in the ongoing work of creative and scholarly researchers, both in conducting research and sharing that research with their larger communities of expertise.

Finally, Linda Wobbe, MLIS, Head of Collection Management from Saint Mary’s College of California will share examples of functionality in mobile apps and sites utilised in a variety of journal, book, and database vendor mobile implementations. The audience will then be encouraged to take part in an interactive rating activity relating to the functionality of mobile applications to determine what are the most popular and useful components to librarians. We will compile through Google docs, the ranking of importance for mobile engagement of key mobile components, and advice for future mobile roadmaps that can be shared with product developers.

Ultimately, this session aims to provide delegates with working examples of content engagement through utilising mobile technology, with solutions to implement in your own library.

Speakers
LH

Laura Horton

Global Library Communications Manager, Taylor & Francis
avatar for Dr. Laura Katz Rizzo

Dr. Laura Katz Rizzo

BFA Program Coordinator, Dance Program, Temple University
Laura Katz Rizzo is currently BFA Dance Program Director in Temple University’s Esther Boyer College of Music and Dance. In addition to her faculty position at Temple University, Dr. Rizzo has taught at Mount Holyoke College, Bryn Mawr College, Drexel University, the Pennsylvania Academy of Ballet, the Dance Theatre of the Southwest, Ballet Theater of New Mexico, among other institutions. She holds a BA in History and English, an Ed. M... Read More →
avatar for Linda Wobbe

Linda Wobbe

Head, Collection Management, Saint Mary's College of California
I'm passionate about transforming libraries to become as skilled in managing and providing access to electronic resources as we are in managing and providing access to print resources. I'm privileged to be working with college students as they embark on changing our world.


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Open Access for Data Sets
Funding agencies around the world are requiring researchers to make available the data sets that underlie their published papers. This session explores the topic of open data sets from both a publisher and library perspective. We will report on primary research undertaken by the IEEE to understand author attitudes towards opening up data sets, as well as the specific characteristics of data sets in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science disciplines. We will then present an example of data management efforts at Stanford University to target scientific data, including plans to create bilateral linking between the published article and the supporting data. Audiences will come away with a deep understanding of the practices, challenges and opportunities for authors, librarians and publishers in opening up data sets in the technical community of computer science and electrical engineering authors

Speakers
avatar for Joe Buzzanga

Joe Buzzanga

Senior Product Manager, Institute of Electronics and Electrical Engineering
I am currently Senior Product Manager for digital products at IEEE. Prior to this position, I worked in product management at Elsevier, Intel and 3Com. My professional interests include scientific communications, machine learning, search, and computer networks. Personal interests include music, cinema, literature and slow food. I have an MBA from Rutgers University, an MLS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an MA in Philosophy, also... Read More →
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering. She also offers workshops and consultation to all students and faculty on campus on citation management tools and research databases. She is the Stanford University... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Opening Open Access: Exposing Digital Images Collections with Ease
As the expectation for free, immediate and unrestricted access to content continues to grow, the opportunity and responsibility to share digital image collections through open access platforms is an important consideration for higher education institutions. For institutions and individuals new to open access sharing, the idea of publishing digital image collections in the open arena can seem daunting; it may raise inspiration for some and doubts for others. This panel will investigate the open access initiatives of three higher education institutions who are publishing digital media collections to various open access platforms, including Omeka, The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and Shared Shelf Commons. Panelists from Bryn Mawr College, University of Delaware and University of Puget Sound will discuss their motivation for sharing content publicly; provide tips and tools for overcoming barriers to open access publication of various media collections; and discuss the results of exposing these digital collections to the public. This session will encourage those hesitant about publishing content on open access platforms to make the most of collections they have sharing rights to, and will provide opportunity to discuss challenges and opportunities related to open access exposure of digital image collections.

Moderators
avatar for Jen Hoyer

Jen Hoyer

Senior Account Manager, Artstor
Artstor

Speakers
JC

Jane Carlin

Library Director, University of Puget Sound
Jane Carlin joined Puget Sound in 2008 coming from University of Cincinnati, where she served as senior librarian for the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Library. There she successfully served in a number of roles, bringing to each a strong commitment to faculty-staff partnership in library instruction; to collection development that supports teaching and research; and to new services and programs that embrace innovation and... Read More →
avatar for Camilla MacKay

Camilla MacKay

Head, Carpenter Library, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Bryn Mawr College
avatar for Gregg Silvis

Gregg Silvis

Associate University Librarian, University of Delaware Library
Gregg is the Associate University Librarian for Information Technology & Digital Initiatives, University of Delaware Library. He just finished leading the UD Library in the implementation of OCLC's WorldShare Management Services (WMS). Always active in the library community and a strong advocate for library collaboration, he has spoken widely on library technology and its impact. Gregg served as delegate to the OCLC Global Council in 2009-2010... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

3:15pm

Owning the Discovery Experience for Your Patrons
A recent wave of ethnographic studies in academic libraries has highlighted both unique and shared behaviors of student researchers. A key discernible trait of undergraduate users is their reliance on Google-type search experiences whose well-defined search algorithms create the expectation that the most relevant results appear within the first page. Great strides in improving the discovery experience for library users have been made in both commercial and open source discovery layers. Discovery layer or web-scale discovery service are terms often used interchangeably to describe library search interfaces that offer access to a greater diversity of sources than those represented within the traditional online public access catalog (OPAC), all with features and functionality familiar to commercial products like Amazon, Google, and Facebook. This shift in focus from traditional catalog to discovery layer reflects a movement within the library to design systems that are more reflective of how people actually search for information. This session highlights key findings from an EBSCO study on the “journey” of undergraduate students as researchers, and then illustrates through case studies how two libraries are positioning their institutions to better own the discovery experience. Panelists from Indiana University and the University of Virginia will discuss their local discovery implementations that leverage both open source software and Software-as-a-Service API integrations. The session will conclude with open discussion on longer-term strategies for enabling persona-based discovery interfaces for research communities.

Speakers
KL

Kate Lawrence

Vice President, User Research, EBSCO Information Services
Kate Lawrence has been uncovering customer insights for more than 15 years. She is passionate about learning the “whys” behind everyday mouse clicks, and illuminating the intersection of people and technology. She is the Vice President of User Research at a global information and research services company.
avatar for Robert McDonald

Robert McDonald

Associate Dean for Research & Technology Strategies, Indiana University
As the Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, Robert H. McDonald works to provide library information system services and discovery services to the entire IU system and manages projects related to scholarly communications, new model publishing, and technologies that enable the Libraries to support teaching and learning for the IU Bloomington campus. In his role as Deputy Director of the Data to Insight Center, he works on new... Read More →
avatar for Courtney McDonald

Courtney McDonald

Head, Discovery and User Experience, Associate Librarian, Indiana University Libraries
avatar for Esther Onega

Esther Onega

Director, Collections Delivery and Access, University of Virgina
Esther Onega has been a librarian in various capacities at the University of Virginia since 1997, starting as the Distance Education Librarian. In 2007 she became the Google Book Project Manager, then Head of the Brown Science & Engineering Library, and now she is the Director of Collections Delivery and Access (ILL, Stacks, HathiTrust, EDS, Alumni Databases, etc.). She received her MLS from the University of Maryland in 1989 and worked as a law... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Preservation of Audio-Visual Collections and Modern Storage Media
Dr. France will provide a broad overview of the research at the Library of Congress in the preservation of collections of audio-visual, magnetic tape, optical disks, fugitive media and blueprints. She will describe their current testing of CDs and DVDs as these deterioration issues are of interest across all types of libraries. Dr. France will describe the matrix she has been developing for recommending what libraries can do to prioritize preservation attention to their collections of modern twentieth century materials, often thought to be a lower risk of loss due to their age, compared to historic traditional material counterparts.

Moderators
avatar for Corrie Marsh

Corrie Marsh

Scholarly Communications & Collections, Old Dominion University Libraries
Corrie Marsh is the Scholarly Communications & Collections at Old Dominion University Libraries. She earned her B.S. at the University of North Texas and her M.S.L.I.S. at Louisiana State University, where she also worked in serials and collection development. Corrie worked in Acquisitions and Collection Management at Old Dominion University, Georgetown Law Center, Brown University, and George Washington University. Her experience in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fenella France

Fenella France

Chief, Preservation Research and Testing Division, Library of Congress
Dr. France is Chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress researching non-destructive imaging techniques, and prevention of environmental degradation on collections. She received her Ph.D from Otago University, New Zealand. After lecturing at Otago, she was the research scientist for the Star-Spangled Banner project at NMAH. An international specialist on polymer aging and environmental deterioration to... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Shotgun Session
Slides from Ashley Krenelka Chase
Slides from Edward Lener and Ladd Brown
Slides from Alana Verminski
Slides from Liza Weisbrod


These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have approximately 10 minutes at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all 5 sessions. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) An Evaluation of ReadCube as an Interlibrary Loan Alternative
Liza Weisbrod, Auburn University

Libraries are continually searching for more affordable ways to provide access to research materials. The cost of providing access to scholarly journal articles continues to rise while library budgets are flat or shrinking. Rising costs of journal subscriptions, site licenses, and interlibrary loan have made libraries look for new methods of providing those materials. In 2014, Auburn University Libraries began a pilot project to test the feasibility of using ReadCube, an article delivery service, as a method of patron driven acquisition for scholarly journal articles. ReadCube allows users immediate access to articles from Nature Publishing Group journals at a lower cost than document delivery or pay per view.This session will present a case study of Auburn University Libraries' experience with ReadCube. The presentation will provide information about the mechanics of the ReadCube service, cost-effectiveness of the service, statistics of journal use, and demographics of users along with the results of a survey conducted to assess user satisfaction. Audience members will be encouraged to discuss their experiences with ReadCube.

2) ILL as Acquisitions: Implementing and Integrating POD in a Research Library
Edward Lener and Ladd Brown, Virginia Tech

This session describes Virginia Tech's implementation of a Purchase-on-Demand (POD) program designed to complement the traditional Interlibrary Loan workflow. POD can offer a way to obtain otherwise unavailable or unlendable content or to get many items at lower cost than a typical borrowing transaction. POD also offers another means of building the collection through purchases of materials we know will get at least one use. We will share details of our program from pilot phase to its broader integration into the acquisitions workflow and share free advice and tips on what has and hasn't worked for us.

3) Share those Stats! Collaborating with Faculty to Make Evidence-Based Serials Collection Development Decisions
AlanaVerminski, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Although many libraries have involved faculty in journal cancellation projects, the St. Mary's College of Maryland librarians took a proactive approach and developed a unique collaborative review process before experiencing our severest budget cuts. By starting conversations with faculty early, we were able to make evidence-based collection development decisions that emphasized usage statistics, increased transparency and built faculty trust.During the 2014 fiscal year, the St. Mary's College of Maryland Library faced a temporary budget reduction, and anticipated much larger and permanent cuts in the coming fiscal years. These budget reductions prompted a need to critically evaluate our journal subscriptions and develop a new collaborative review process. In this new process, we leveraged usage statistics, librarian collection development experience and the subject expertise of faculty. Our primary goals were to strengthen library-faculty relationships and give faculty ownership over the difficult decisions we knew would have to be made. In doing so, we sought to foster good-will towards the library and facilitate honest and productive conversations with faculty.Transparency was critical throughout the process. Librarians were very candid when speaking to faculty about the reality of budgets cuts and subscription costs. We shared our usage statistics and created an online tool to explain the data for faculty. In addition, subject liaisons were given a journal review toolkit to prepare for productive meetings with faculty. All journals recommended for cancellation were posted to the library website, giving faculty the opportunity to comment and voice their opinions in a public forum.

4) The Importance of Being FREE
AshleyKrenelka Chase, Stetson University College of Law

Who doesn't love free stuff? In an age where everything seems to cost something, incorporating free electronic materials into library collections is more important than ever. At the end of this shotgun session, attendees will learn which freebies are worth adding, why, and how best to add the materials without taking up a lot of staff time.

5) Discovery of Librarians' Favorites
Tara Robenalt, HighWire Press

Librarians, does anyone ever ask you what are your favorite holdings at your library, or favorites in a special collection? Has your library collected unique manuscripts, maps, archives that you want to be discovered and easily shared with others so they visit your library (physically or virtually)? Is there a unique combination of cross-disciplinary related material that can only be put together with your expertise and knowledge of the material? Do you want to share with the world your favorite curations? Or, just need an easy way to share a commonly-requested list of holdings (where people can follow updates to that list)?HighWire recently launched a public discovery tool where scholars can share their favorite curations and discover others' collections of scholarly material, and we invite librarians to share their most personal favorites from their libraries with the world. See how many digital followers you can get to your own personal curation of library holdings!Join this fun session to learn about how librarians can make their personal favorites or commonly-requested items on a topic available to a public community of scholars.

Speakers
avatar for Ladd Brown

Ladd Brown

Head of Acquisitions, Virginia Tech
A lot of things have changed in the thirty-odd years Ladd has been in the library biz. Not being able to smoke at your desk in Tech Services anymore is one of the biggies.
avatar for Ashley Krenelka Chase

Ashley Krenelka Chase

Associate Director, Stetson University College of Law - Dolly & Homer Hand Law Library
Ashley Krenelka Chase is the Associate Director at the Dolly & Homer Hand Law Library at Stetson University College of Law in Gulfport, Florida.  As Associate Director, Ashley is responsible for the coordination and direction of the law library electronic resources, including database access, web page development, and electronic resource management, as well as coordination of acquisitions and reference and outreach services for the library... Read More →
TR

Tara Robenalt

VP, Workflow Solutions, HighWire Press
avatar for Alana Verminski

Alana Verminski

Reference and Instruction Librarian, St. Mary's College of Maryland
St. Mary's College of Maryland
LW

Liza Weisbrod

Collection Team Member, Auburn University Libraries


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

So Now What? Realizing the Potential of the Press in the Library
At least 25% of university presses report to academic library directors, but the nature of these relationships varies widely. Many are currently just administratively-convenient reporting lines, but an increasing number reflect a much more unified vision. At universities such as Michigan, Temple, Indiana, Purdue, and Oregon State new titles are emerging that combine the directorship of the university press with a senior leadership role in the library. This session aims to describe the rationale behind the creation of these newly integrated positions, evaluate the risks that such experimentation might pose to both library and press partners, and explore the opportunities that inserting publishing professionals fully into the library might now offer. This is new territory, and the speakers will encourage participants to explore the unfolding landscape together. Expect to hear unusual perspectives on the role of institutional repositories, insights into how to sustain open access strategies without draining authors dry, and intriguing thoughts about how to connect the library and press to its host institution in new ways. Attendees will be challenged to rethink the roles of both university presses and library publishers, and will leave with new ideas about how they can affect scholarly communication change on their own campuses.

Speakers
DH

Donna Hayward

Executive Associate Director, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Joseph Lucia

Joseph Lucia

Dean of Libraries, Temple University
Joseph Lucia is Dean of Libaries at Temple University. Prior to that, he served as University Library at Villanova University for eleven years. During his tenure at Villanova, Falvey Library won the 2013 ACRL Excellence Award in the University category. Before assuming his post at Villanova in 2002, Lucia served as Director for Library Technology & Access Services within the Information Resources organization at Lehigh University in... Read More →
avatar for Mary Rose Muccie

Mary Rose Muccie

Director, Temple University Press
Mary Rose Muccie is Director, Temple University Press, and Scholarly Communications Officer, Temple University Library. Prior to joining Temple she held positions at JSTOR, Project MUSE, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Streamlining and Advancing Collection Development with GOBI: Bringing Your Collection Into the 21st Century
Based on real life experiences, the presenters will detail how GOBI, a web-based application from YBP Library Services, can speed collection development selections, ordering, and MARC record exporting. Our objective is to share our successes implementing new collection development strategies and services. These include involving our faculty and library users in the library’s collection development process, establishing a DDA program to take the guess work out of providing the most relevant quality materials for our users, and collecting and reviewing statistics by fund code to help us determine in which areas users are seeking content. Attendees will learn how GOBI speeds selection by identifying items not currently in the library’s collection regardless of format. In addition, we will discuss how to view acquisitions by peer libraries and consortial partners as well as access professional book reviews that are available at point of selection within the interface. These techniques can be beneficial when performing collection assessments and preparing accreditation documents for review. Questions from the audience will be encouraged and attendees are welcome to share their experiences with GOBI and other collection development systems.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Barnett

Lindsay Barnett

Acquisitions and Electronic Resources Manager, College of Charleston
avatar for Sarah Hoke

Sarah Hoke

Collection Development Manager, YBP Library Services
avatar for Christa Poparad

Christa Poparad

Head of Research & Instruction Services, College of Charleston
In addition to scheduled information literacy instruction throughout the curriculum, the Information Desk in Addlestone Library at the College of Charleston, a joint venture between the library and IT's student computing support, provides the CofC community assistance with research and information technology at a single point of need instruction service point. Our 30 person staff includes librarians, IT professionals, and peer staff student... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Success Strategies for Content Discovery: A Cross-Industry White Paper
Success in information retrieval means that a researcher discovers pertinent materials and efficiently accesses the full-text content or data for that information. Success for a library means meeting the needs of information seekers with the materials they collect, license or purchase – to provide discovery of and access to those materials. Success for a publisher means that their publications are fully integrated into a library system, so that libraries and their users get maximum benefit from finding and using this content. In reality, due to faulty processes, lack of application of standards and missing updates, information seekers are often incapable of accessing content. A collaborative group of librarians, publishers and OCLC will release a White Paper in September 2014 with recommendations and practical implementation guidelines for an improved workflow for quality metadata and access data. Join a discussion on best practices in applying industry standards and how to implement findings and recommendations into practice.

Moderators
avatar for Suzanne Saskia Kemperman

Suzanne Saskia Kemperman

Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations, OCLC, Director, Business Development and Publisher Relations
Suzanne Kemperman is the Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations at OCLC. She is responsible for OCLC's content acquisition strategy and partnerships with content providers to enhance content discovery and access. She has worked for 30 years in the publishing and information industry in Europe and the United States, including STM, academic and educational publishing. Suzanne began working in electronic publishing at Springer in... Read More →

Speakers
TF

Ted Fons

Executive Director, Data Services & WorldCat Quality, OCLC
avatar for Alexandra de Lange

Alexandra de Lange

Head of Third-Party Platform Relations, Elsevier Science
Alexandra de Lange is the Head of Third-Party Platforms in Elsevier. In this role she is responsible for strategy and policy development as well as product- and partnership management related to discoverability of content published on ScienceDirect.  ScienceDirect is Elsevier’s full-text platform where researchers can read and interact with content from over 2,500 journals and 26,000 e-books. Recent developments in the area of... Read More →
avatar for Carlen Ruschoff

Carlen Ruschoff

Director of Technical Services & Strategic Initiat, University of Maryland
Carlen Ruschoff is Director of Technical Services & Strategic Initiatives at the University of Maryland, College Park. Over a span of 35 years, she has held various positions in Technical Services and Information Technology. Carlen’s aspiration throughout her career has been to maximize the use automated processes in Libraries to free up staff to focus on new priorities. She is active in the library profession and has served in... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Swets: What Is Going On In Our Industry?
Discussion of the Swets bankruptcy led by Dan Tonkery.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Why the Resistance? Trends and Results from a Collaborative Survey on E-book Usage Across Eight Academic Institutions
Usage indicates that students and faculty at academic institutions are using e-books, and yet anecdotal feedback indicates some resistance to the e-book format. Students and faculty at eight institutions were surveyed to explore attitudes towards use of print and electronic books. The survey was constructed specifically to determine factors influencing preference for electronic or print books. This research builds on a 2012 study of e-book use and attitudes at a liberal arts institution, but expands the research to multiple, diverse institutions including public and private, small and medium sized, undergraduate and graduate levels, and institutions in the Northeast U.S., Florida and California.

Objectives: The main objectives of the session will include panelists discussion of results from the more than 7000 responses received and exploration of differences between the institutions and how those difference may impact use and attitudes. Additionally, panelist discussion will include similarities in results across multiple institutions.

Audience Participation:The audience will be surveyed for similarities between their own institutions and the institutions surveyed. Audience participation will be encouraged in discussion of survey results, especially in how the results might be similar or difference from audience members’ perception of attitudes towards e-books at their own institutions.

Learning Outcomes: Audience members will understand which students and faculty at their institutions are likely to use e-books, and which are likely to use only print books. Audience members will understand which factors influence a preference for electronic books. Audience members will learn how the participating institutions used the survey results to influence their collection decisions.

Speakers
DD

Debbi Dinkins

Associate Dean of the Library, Stetson University
Dinkins is the Associate Dean of the Library, working closely with the Library Dean on issues of administration and planning. She is responsible for the management of the library’s materials budgets and operating budgets. She oversees the acquisition and cataloging of the library’s collections, which include over 300,000 volumes of books and bound periodicals, more than 110,000 electronic books, and access to over 64,000... Read More →
avatar for Anne Cerstvik Nolan, MLS

Anne Cerstvik Nolan, MLS

Electronic Resources Librarian, Brown University
Anne has been at the Brown University Library for 24 years, first as Assistant Head of Reference and Head of Interlibrary Loan. Along the way, someone realized that all of the eresources work she had been doing (in addition to the other two jobs) was really a full-time job, and so her current position of Electronic Resources Librarian was created, and she moved to Acquisitions. Having only worked in public services to that point, Anne had to... Read More →
KS

Kathleen Sacco

Assistant Director and Coordinator of Collection, SUNY Fredonia
Kathleen Sacco has been at the State University of NY at Fredonia for 16 years, beginning as the Electronic Resources Librarian. Moving to Library Systems, and then to her current position as Assistant Director and Coordinator of Collection, Ms. Sacco wears many hats and enjoys them all.
RW

Robert Walsh

Social Sciences Librarian, Trinity College
Rob Walsh never thought he’d grow up to be a librarian – but, he’s glad he did. After finishing his MA in African American Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, and not wanting to be a well educated bartender or a hapless PhD candidate, he moved back East and eventually pursued his MLS at Southern Connecticut State University. Since the Fall of 2010, he has been Social Sciences Librarian at Trinity... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:00pm

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Education Week

In addition to the usual drinks and snacks, we will also have ice cream bars to celebrate the Charleston Neapolitans!  


Thursday November 6, 2014 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:30pm

Budgets, Services, and Technology Driving Change: How Librarians, Publishers and Vendors are Moving Forward

The economic challengers in higher education and healthcare coupled with continuing budget concerns have libraries, publishers and vendors making strategic changes as they seek to provide a high-level of services at a time when uncertainty continues to dominate planning and development. Creative thinking has become the norm as organizations seek to challenge long-held views and uncover and implement needed changes. Librarians, publishers, and vendors have all experienced a period of assessment, strategic review and reaction as a result of the continued evolution from a print-based model to one dominated by electronic dissemination of scholarly information and the new role eBooks promise to play. This presentation addresses some of the important actions taken by librarians, publishers and vendors to cope with changes forced by both the economy and budget pressures, by the continued migration of scholarly resources to electronic formats and by current and planned eBook activities and new eBooks models. It explores patterns in library content selection and spending trends, publisher prices and pricing models, as well as vendor strategies and tactics challenging and changing times.  Data to be presented is the result of customer research conducted by EBSCO within the last six months.


Speakers
avatar for Meg White

Meg White

Executive Director of Technology Services, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.
Meg White is a twenty-year veteran of the health sciences publishing industry. Her background includes various sales, marketing, and product development positions at Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Mosby, Williams & Wilkins, and Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. She is a frequent speaker at industry-related conferences on the topics of product development, technology, curriculum, and continuing medical education... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:30pm

Online Learning, MOOCs, and More
Slides from Franny Lee

Knowledgeable panelists will present significant studies that address such key measures as: Uptake and completion, Pedagogical success, Certification, Supporting Infrastructures, What does it Cost, and What happens next?, all of which significantly advance understanding of the place of online learning and MOOCs in contemporary education. Our aim is to go beyond the history and the hype (and the excellent stage-setting that was done last year at the Charleston Conference) to talk about real steps in understanding and exploiting distance learning.

Speakers
avatar for franny lee

franny lee

GM and VP SIPX (Co-Founder), SIPX (ProQuest, Ex Libris)
Franny Lee is GM and VP ProQuest SIPX and leads the team.  Franny is dedicated to harnessing technology to make content, copyright and education more accessible and affordable. She is a frequent speaker and writer on the emerging issues at the intersection of campus needs, libraries, online education, digital content and high technology, and serves on the Management Board of MIT Press.  Originally a composer and jazz musician, Franny... Read More →
avatar for Deanna Marcum

Deanna Marcum

Managing Director, Ithaka S+R
As Ithaka S+R managing director, Deanna Marcum leads the research and consulting services that assist universities and colleges, libraries, publishers, and cultural institutions as they make the transition to the digital environment. She heads a growing staff of program directors and analysts with wide-ranging expertise. | | From 2003 to 2011, Deanna served as associate librarian for Library Services, Library of Congress. She managed 53... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:30pm

What’s the Big Idea? Mellon, ARL, AAU, University Presses, and the Future of Scholarly Communication

In the summer of 2014, both Mellon and an AAU-ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communication announced proposals designed to seek innovative ways that “digital technologies can increase access to and reduce the cost of scholarly communications” (AAU-ARL) and to discover “opportunities to shape knowledge formation and dissemination to emerging needs and media” (Mellon). Concern over issues of cost, access, the free-rider problem, and ongoing sustainability for scholarly monographs and their sponsoring publishers (often university presses) are not new issues, but the announcement of these large-scale initiatives have the potential to change the conversation and develop some viable solutions and new thinking in the research publication value chain. The AAU-ARL initiative seeks to address the problems of the tenure monograph, while Mellon also aspires to make digital publishing “a first-class means” of dissemination and to encourage scholars to “participate more fully in the interactive Web.”

Critical to both these initiatives will be the involvement of university presses, for the processes of selection, development, vetting, and publication of monographs, and libraries as partners in developing new hosting capabilities and channels of dissemination. This plenary will gather representatives from the ARL, AAU, and scholarly publishers to discuss recent developments with the proposed projects and how such ecosystem partnerships might function in the years to come.

This roundtable discussion will be followed by an open Q&A to engage with members of the audience.

Moderators
LS

Leila Salisbury

Director, University Press of Mississippi
Leila W. Salisbury has been the director of the University Press of Mississippi (UPM) since 2008. Prior to her appointment, she was marketing director of the University Press of Kentucky. At UPM, she is responsible for the overall direction and management of the scholarly publishing operation, its editorial focus, fundraising, and new technology initiatives and investments. She also acquires the regional and film/popular culture studies lists and... Read More →

Speakers
RC

Raym Crow

Senior Consultant, SPARC
Raym Crow is Senior Consultant with the SPARC Consulting Group, and principal of Chain Bridge Group, a consulting firm providing publishing and sustainability planning services to learned and professional societies, university presses, academic libraries, and digital publishing projects. Crow specializes in developing plans for collaborative publishing projects and supply-side business models capable of supporting open-access dissemination. He... Read More →
HC

Helen Cullyer

Program Officer in Scholarly Communications, Mellon Foundation
Helen Cullyer is program officer in the Scholarly Communications Program of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation  She works closely with Senior Program Officer Donald J. Waters on developing new grantmaking initiatives and reviewing grant proposals in the areas of scholarly publication, preservation, and access and library services.  She also works with program staff on the evaluation and assessment of grant-funded projects.  Ms... Read More →
BK

Barbara Kline Pope

Executive Director for Communications and the National Academies Press, The National Academies
Barbara Kline Pope is Executive Director for Communications and the National Academies Press at The National Academies and is the current president of the Association of American University Presses.  She is responsible for an innovative and dynamic publishing operation of both scholarly and trade books that have been available on the Web free to read since 1995.   In addition to book publishing, she manages marketing and... Read More →
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

6:00pm

Networking Happy Hour
Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions.  Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages.

Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Breaking It Down: Electronic Resource Workflow Documentation
Managing electronic resources is a fairly complex process faced by librarians with ever more frequency in today’s digital environment. In an effort to approach the possibility of purchasing an Electronic Resource Manager (ERM), electronic resource workflow processes were investigated and documented. The life cycle of electronic resources takes a very different form than that of its print counterpart, and it can prove immensely useful to the library to examine these workflows. Such workflow documentation can offer the opportunity for analysis, exposure of problem areas, occurrences of overlap or duplication, and can lead to discussions amongst faculty and staff that are crucial to the smooth running of the institution. This talk will examine the methodology and framework used to document these workflows. It involves interviews with staff and faculty involved in these procedures, discussions with stakeholders at different levels of the electronic workflow, and clarification of the steps involved in these electronic workflows. Once the workflows have been documented, they will undergo analysis. This strategy can expose “gaps” in the procedure, indicate where the workflow can be streamlined, and encourage conversations within library departments that can lead to new and more effective workflows.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Hamlett

Alexandra Hamlett

Assistant Professor, Information Literacy Services & Instruction, Stella and Charles Guttman Community College


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Collection Management: Using New Library Space to Transition from Print to Electronic Resources
This session is designed to describe the process of reducing the University of Baltimore Law Library's collection from 175,000 to around 55,000 volumes in preparation for the move to the new law building in Spring 2013. This 3 year process, involving Technical Services included managing multiple projects: identifying cancelled titles that could be de-accessioning and discarding volumes, for titles that we cancelled and are no longer receiving updates for. This involves various TS procedures in cleaning up records. We identified titles that could be offered for donation. Items that were identified for donation included journal titles, a few National Reporter titles donated to local Law firms. We donated bound volumes to journal titles along with loose issues to our sister school the Ocean University of China. This session will go into more detail of the project management process that was involved. Microfiche titles were also offered as donations. This session will also cover the process of Radio Frequency ID tagged, or RFID tagged and conversion to accommodate the 11 security gates located throughout the multi-level law library. The new design and layout, made for an easy transition from traditionally relying on print resource to using electronic resources.

Speakers
MM

Mary Murtha

Serials Management Librarian, University of Baltimore Law Library
I am the Serials Management Librarian for the University of Baltimore Law Library, working in Collections and Database Services or CADS. I have held this position since March 2008. Prior to working at the University of Baltimore, I worked at Harford Community College, working in the Library's Technical Services where I held the position of Serials Check-in Technician. While working at HCC, I attended the University of Pittsburgh earning my... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Data Visualization in the Library: Tips and Tricks for Communicating Clearly (and Earnestly)
The data visualization revolution that has changed the way people consume information online, through the mass media, and in print also has relevance for the dissemination of library data. Conveying information graphically can be a great way to advocate for increased funding, shifts in collection development priorities, or other changes to library policies, procedures and collections. A well-planned and aesthetically pleasing infographic does not require extensive graphic design experience, and the results will often find a wider audience than a traditional written report.This session will cover some common tools and strategies for incorporating data visualization into library work and will also touch on some of the benefits, and possible pitfalls, of using infographics to convey information to administration, colleagues, and library patrons. The presenter will outline her experiences transforming reams of data from a collection development project at Westfield State University into orderly, accessible graphics. Attendees will walk away with a list of user-friendly applications and resources to help them begin to explore data visualization on their own.

Speakers
avatar for Becca Brody

Becca Brody

Digital Resource and Collection Development Librarian, Westfield State University


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Earnest Expectations: How Closely Do the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians Reflect Their Daily Experience?
The purpose of this project is to compare the North American Serials Group (NASIG) “Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians” to findings from a 2007-8 survey that collected data from 345 electronic resources librarians regarding their individual job duties and how and where they acquired the knowledge necessary to accomplish those tasks. [1] While the NASIG Core Competencies, which are based on electronic resources librarian position advertisements posted between 2005-2009, represent libraries’ stated requirements for electronic resources librarian positions, findings from the survey describe electronic resources librarians’ daily tasks. According to Hartnett, the Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians has been criticized for being “too broad – it is more a list of everything an ER librarian might be expected to do and less a list of ‘core’ competencies for the position.”[2] In addition to providing guidance for those tasked with describing an electronic resources librarian position as in an employment advertisement, the Task Force presents the document as a useful tool for identifying “criteria upon which to evaluate the performance” of electronic resources librarians, [3] establishing it as a significant guidepost for electronic resources librarians’ professional lives and development. Attendees will learn about the extent to which the NASIG document reflects electronic resources librarians’ descriptions of their daily lives on the job as depicted in the survey.

Although the survey was conducted in 2007-8, it is an appropriate source of comparison data for the NASIG Core Competencies, which draw upon employment advertisements from the same period. Findings from this analysis will inform development of an updated electronic resources librarian survey to be conducted in the spring and summer of 2015.

1. North American Serials Interest Group. Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians, 2013.
2. Fleming-May, Rachel A. and Jill E. Grogg. Finding their Way: Electronic Resources Librarians' Education, Training, and Community. Austin, TX: 2010.
3. Hartnett, Eric. "NASIG's Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians Revisited: An Analysis of Job Advertisement Trends, 2000–2012." The Journal of Academic Librarianship (2014).

Speakers
RF

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences; University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Licensing Program Strategist, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Licensing Program Strategist with LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources librarian at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Earnestly Finding the Fun in Fund Codes
Whether an institution is completely restructuring their fund codes after migrating to a new ILS or considering moderate improvements to address reporting or statistical analysis, this presentation will outline two very different methods for organizing fund code designations. Virginia Tech and The University of Alabama will present two different models for structuring fund codes and discuss the benefits and obstacles inherent to each method. Both groups will share their philosophy and approach for allocating appropriate fund codes for budgeting, reporting, and analysis purposes. The discussion will focus on important considerations that are made when assigning fund codes such as: spending priorities and budget allocation for subscription and one-time resources; creating meaningful codes to aid statistical reporting for accreditation organizations, ARL, and other yearly reports; tracking historical funding; and representing university goals and programs. What is the best fund code structure? We will address this question as we discuss VT and UA methods and compare popular fund code structures and alternatives. Amidst the climate of proliferating formats, increased electronic resources, and inflationary costs, there is opportunity for institutions to consider various ILS acquisition designations and to align their funding structures in meaningful ways. Discussion will also include how your specific ILS dictates your fund code structure. This information is equally relevant to the novice seeking basic information, as well as to seasoned Acquisitions staff implementing new initiatives, migrating ILS platforms, incorporating new formats, or supporting new disciplines or departments.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Collections Assessment Librarian, Virginia Tech
Tracy Gilmore is the Collections Assessment Librarian at Virginia Tech University Libraries. She coordinates assessment activities and strategies for developing the library’s digital collections. Her current research interests include discovery service usability, usage, and access.
CS

Connie Stovall

Head of Acquisitions, The University of Alabama
In a gentle way, you can shake the world. | | I spend most of my time working as a librarian so that I may spend the remainder of my time doing what I love most: running, hiking, cycling, observing life in the wild, and laughing at the antics of my three very spoiled but aging cats. I like to hang out with people sometimes, too. :-)


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Evidence-Based Collection Development
Collection Development in today's academic library is a new animal. Our collections have effectively moved from separately managed print and electronic models to a blend of the two, including digital content, open access content, PDA/DDA programs, and varying acquisitions models. These new demands have not only changed how libraries respond to the collection development process, but how our tools function as well. What is needed more than ever is the data required to support these latest models. Evidence based collection development is no longer a wish list item, it is essential for today's academic library to manage budgets efficiently.

In this session, we will review in earnest the helpful tools and workflows available within our implementation of Ex Libris Alma and Primo including acquiring multiple formats, automatic knowledgebase updates, downloading and importing records, vendor data cleanup and enhancement, and content agnostic discovery for both staff and patrons. We will take a look at some of our canned, homemade, and shareable reports available in Alma Analytics today (as well as planned reporting) that help us to make accurate purchasing decisions and identify the resources that add the greatest value to our collections.

This session is geared towards directors and librarians alike. We encourage sharing, questions, ideas, and brainstorming to help us create and visualize the latest reports for collection development in a next generation library solution.

Speakers
avatar for Ido Peled

Ido Peled

VP, Solutions & Marketing, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
SS

Steve Smith

Head of Collection Development, Boston University


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Flipping the Library
Flipping the Library utilizes resources the library already purchases and creates to solve a problem every academic library faces. We all have too many classes that require information literacy presentations and too little time to present them to the students that need it. Flipping the Library promotes collaboration between librarians and faculty by using technology to embed information literacy into their courses. I will show how I am using LibGuides, tutorials, Canvas and Camtasia to enable faculty to include information literacy lesson in their course on their terms.I will bring sample handouts I use in class to engage students and demonstrate what information literacy is and how to build these skills. I will conduct a brainstorming session to find out how others are using these technical resources and their ideas to improve this concept.

Speakers
CC

Cindy Campbell

Acquisitions Librarian, Florida SouthWestern State College
Cindy Campbell is a reference/acquisitions librarian for Florida SouthWestern State College in Fort Myers, Florida. She holds a Master’s of Information and Library Science from the University of South Florida and a Master’s of Education in Interdisciplinary Studies from Capella University. She is also a native of Charleston, South Caroline. She has worked in acquisitions for ten years and loves to use technology in new and... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Implementing a Library Reading List Tool in a Learning Management System
Digital textbooks, social media, video content. It seems as if instructors are moving everything into online and hybrid classrooms except for the resources of the library! How can librarians bring the world of quality databases, ebooks, and other digital resources from the library’s discovery system easily and directly into the online learning environment? This presentation will showcase how a plug-in for learning management systems (e.g., Moodle, Blackboard, Desire2Learn, Sakai, Canvas) adds unprecedented functionality for online course instructors: the ability to create reading lists of library materials without ever having to leave the course site. The plug-in allows instructors to create library reading lists without grappling with permalinks, proxy prefixes, or PDFs, leveraging the value of the library discovery system in a frictionless environment. This presentation will show how Santa Rosa Libraries collaborated with EBSCO to develop a tool that allows instructors to create reading lists embedded within Moodle. The reading list points to the library’s discovery system, EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS), allowing one-click full-text access for students. The tool also enables instructors to annotate reading list items and copy other reading lists created at Santa Rosa.

This presentation will discuss the reading list tool implementation at Santa Rosa, including:



  • How educators can create and manage course reading lists right from the libraries’ Learning Management System (LMS).

  • How the tool engages entities outside the library for development and promotion, while embedding the library in the university’s virtual community.

  • How staff can view statistics, including which institutions’ courses and educators are using the tool and how many readings are included.



The Reading List plugin is an LTI Tool Provider 1.0, and is compatible with any learning management system that is LTI-compliant. The list of compliant LMS's includes Moodle, Blackboard, Canvas, and Desire2Learn. The tool was built using the discovery system’s API and the LTI protocol. Attend this presentation to see how the library is directly embedded in the online learning management system!

Speakers
DE

Dave Edwards

Director, Discovery Service Engineering, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Alicia Virtue

Alicia Virtue

Electronic Services Librarian, Santa Rosa Junior College
Alicia Virtue is the Electronic Services Librarian for Santa Rosa Junior College, responsible for library web services and library systems administration of a multi-campus community college library in California. Alicia was the recipient of a Library Journal Movers & Shakers award for 2014 and enjoys introducing innovative applications of educational technology for use in learning environments.


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Modes of Discovery: Locating the Scholarly Conversation in History
In this session, I will present the results of a citation analysis that a) investigates the contours of the scholarly conversation in history over a five-year period and b) analyzes the extent to which this conversation is manifest in several discovery and indexing tools, including Historical Abstracts, Summon, JSTOR, WorldCat, and Google Scholar.Citations included in the analysis are drawn from research articles published in the American Historical Review between 2009-2013. All citations to secondary, non-archival sources were included in the formation of a population, then randomly sampled for analysis. Citations in the sample have been coded for date of publication, language, and format, providing a multi-dimensional snapshot of the scholarly conversation in history (inclusive of all geographic areas and time periods covered by AHR articles in this period). Secondly, the citations in the sample have been looked up in each of the discovery tools listed above. Resulting data depicts the extent to which each tool captures the conversation, as defined by the sample in the study, with views into the language, format, and date range characterizations that differentiate each tool’s approximation of the sample.

This project aims to contribute to the earnest conversations in libraries concerning efforts to facilitate discovery and exposure of collections. These conversations are often punctuated by questions about how to assess the continuing value of discipline-specific indexing services, as libraries adopt web scale tools and encourage vendors to share more data, facilitating cross-platform, algorithmically based discovery in the aggregate. Taking history as a case study, and incorporating considerations of user awareness, expectations, and use patterns with disparate tools, this project should illuminate and provide evidence for at least part of a bigger picture. The method may be useful for others who would like to perform similar assessments, particularly with feedback from members of the audience.

Speakers
AP

Alexa Pearce

Librarian for History & American Culture, University of Michigan


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Motivations and Expectations of Community-Based Authors: A Case Study
Publishing, especially self-publishing, is changing with advances in technology including print on demand and electronic publishing. Community-based authors are taking advantage of these advances and are seeking new venues to publish their works. Recently, the focus has been on the innovative libraries that are stepping in to support these publications such as the ones featured at the Preconference. Yet, little is known about these community-based authors themselves. What do authors working outside of traditional publishing know about crafting a quality book and what experience do they bring to the table? What are their plans for marketing their work? What motivates them to write and to seek publication in the first place? This session will report on a series of surveys of publishing-workshop participants carried out at the Woodneath Public Library, part of Kansas City’s Mid-Continent Public Library System. Survey questions address the questions listed above and more. After presenting the findings from these surveys, the presenters will analyze the results, helping ultimately to situate this group of authors and their needs in the current publishing landscape. Throughout the session, audience members will share their ideas by answering online survey questions, and presenters will post the results of the questions in real time as a way of furthering the conversation. Issues such as the role of the library in publishing and the overall quality of self-published works have been known to invite polemics, and the rich reactions of attendees through short polls will add an additional dimension to the content being presented. Besides learning about the motivation, knowledge, and expectations of community-based authors and seeing the reactions of their peers, attendees can also expect to learn about this particular case study: the initiatives of the innovative Woodneath Story Center along with the Woodneath Press.

This poster was also prepared by Heather Lea Moulaison, Assistant Professor at University of Missouri's iSchool, who is unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Chris LeBeau

Chris LeBeau

Asst Teaching Professor, University of Missouri
Poster: Motivations and Expectations of Community-Based [Self-Published] Authors | Interests: Everything! Managing Collections and E-Resources, Copyright, Business Resources, LIS Education


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

No Dust in the Stacks: Creating a Customized Local Serials Collection on the Fly
Have you found your journal collection gathering dust? Or are your online journals suffering from lack of use? Creating a customized serials list may revive an otherwise underused collection. This presentation presents a method, in development, for creating a customizable core journal list for specialized or small academic library collections. Developing a local ranking system based on qualitative and quantitative evidence can be useful for libraries serving a newly-created program or evaluating an established one. During this session, we will explore some philosophy and best practices, and discuss how you can apply those to your own collection. The speakers will demonstrate how to rank and weight local needs alongside external measures like standard lists and peer comparisons. The method, which has been used to evaluate a niche academic branch collection, is ideally suited to solo librarians or those who have little time and few resources. Attendees will be able to use this method to make logical collection development decisions through diligent applications of gathered evidence and communicate the reasoning behind those decisions to stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Laurel Sammonds Crawford

Laurel Sammonds Crawford

Coordinator of Collection Development, University of North Texas Libraries
Laurel has a BS in Zoology and earned her MLIS from Louisiana State University. Her research interests include collection analysis, electronic resource use and delivery, and library leadership.
avatar for Karen Harker

Karen Harker

Collection Assessment Librarian, University of North Texas
University of North Texas
DM

Derek Marshall

Coordinator of the College of Veterinary Medicine Library, Mississippi State University


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Serious Savings with Short-Term Loans
Liberty University enrolls over 90,000 students online and this number continues to grow. In part because of its increasing enrollment, the Jerry Falwell Library has seen the use of its e-book collections increase dramatically. In order to best serve students while maintaining costs, various methods have been used to manage the library’s PDA program. This session will focus in particular on a short-term loan (STL) pilot conducted by the library in fiscal year 2014. Collection management librarians will share the rationale for implementing the STL pilot program, the process of implementation, the results of the pilot, and future considerations for STLs and PDA. The session is intended for those new to or considering short-term loans at their institution. All participants will be able to identify several potential benefits of STLs, as well as possible concerns of using the model.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Crane

Erin Crane

E-books Librarian, Liberty University
Erin Crane grew up in Virginia and received her B.A. in English from the University of Mary Washington. She then received her M.S.L.S. from the University of North Carolina. She then got started as the E-books Librarian at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia in 2011. Erin is also the liaison librarian to the Family and Consumer Sciences department as well as the School of Music. | | I've worked at Liberty University for over 3 years now... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Staying Dry - Serials Deselection at a Comprehensive Cancer Care Research Library
On October 17, 2013, a large section of HVAC duct work dislodged from its ties in the ceiling above shelves of bound print serials in the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Medical Library. Upon falling, the duct work struck and damaged the pipes of the fire suppression system and released hundreds of gallons of water onto the serials below for 8 minutes. Response to the disaster was swift, involving all library staff members, several MD Anderson entities from various departments, and outside contractors. What started out as disaster recovery, quickly evolved into a need to assess our print serials collection in a library serving a cancer hospital, its clinicians, and its researchers.

The Research Medical Library has moved forward in tandem with developing technologies over the years, adopting large collections of digital resources to serve the information needs of its users, while still maintaining a physical library space and 23 shelves of bound print serials. Before the water event, discussion had already begun on the need to analyze our tangible volumes, in light of the decentralized use of the library’s tools. Ideas had been debated on what the physical library could be without the burden of those largely unused volumes, and this incident accelerated those debates.

This discussion looks at the unique steps of deselection encountered at the Research Medical Library following a situation that coerced us into action. From the attempts to develop a simple logic, to romanticized ideals of library collections, and to the self-reflection of what it means to be an oncology library, it is still not a simple task to reduce print collections in the digital age, and our individuality compounded that complexity. However, the work needed to be completed, and it needed to be a fair and inclusive process.

Speakers
AL

Allen Lopez

Collections Librarian, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center
I was born and raised in Houston, TX, and I've been lucky enough to remain a part of Houston's professional library culture. Becoming a medical librarian was a happy accident, and I hope to be a part of this career track for a very long time. I'm interested in creating efficient information architecture design to benefit the user experience. Yet, I still recognize the need for information professionals to be present and assist users in their... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

The Importance of Being Earnest about Using Government Information to Study the Arts
Both United States and British government information collections offer rich, primary resources for studying the history of literature, film, and the arts. Exploring the interdisciplinary content published by these governments allows researchers to discover changing societal perceptions towards artists such as Oscar Wilde, morality messaging in artistic works, and the role of the state in supporting or censoring the arts. Government publications provide insight into historical and contemporary questions about the arts—for example: What is the purpose of poetry? What constitutes “filthy literature?” What did the theater-going public expect from first-class vaudeville entertainment? Does violent entertainment encourage violent behavior? They also highlight how phrases from literature—such as “the importance of being earnest”—have made their way into common parlance and are documented in government resources as a reflection of the time. And both UK and US government documents contain examples of poetry and verse. This session will explore the value of using government information to enrich arts-related research in a variety of contexts. The presenters will demonstrate how government publications provide a lens into the relationship between social change, the formation of public policy, and the function of the arts in the human experience. They will show how events documented in government publications have been dramatized, making their way into theatre, film, and popular culture. Finally, they will attempt to raise awareness about ease of access to this material and to engage attendees in a dialogue about their own experiences using this unique content.

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Johnson

Catherine Johnson

Product Manager-Lead, ProQuest
As Product Manager Lead at ProQuest, Catherine Johnson is responsible for ProQuest Congressional products. Catherine brings expertise and industry knowledge to her current role at ProQuest as the former Director of Market Planning for academic market legislative and historic services at LexisNexis. Catherine’s 34 years of experience in government information began at the start of her career working on CIS/Index in the editorial department... Read More →
MR

Marianne Ryan

Associate University Librarian, User Strategies, Northwestern University Libraries


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Turning a Crisis into an Opportunity: DDA and PDA at UTA Libraries
Facing a 72% cut in Monographic acquisitions budget in FY13-14, UTA Libraries turned a crisis into an opportunity. We examined print monographs’ circulation data to face the hard truth that the “Just-in-case” collection development model is no longer sustainable nor serving our users. Subsequently, Approval plan was put on a virtual mode, no more Approval book shipments. DDA programs for both electronic and print books were implemented. Broader PDA programs were also implemented to meet our user needs.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Zhang

Peter Zhang

Department Head of Access and Discovery, UTA Libraries
Department Head, Access and Discovery at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. The department is an integrated technical service unit encompassing Acquisition, Cataloging, Interlibrary Loan, and Stacks Management. Over 10 years' experience with MARC record customization, bulk loading, and authority control.


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Using an ERMS to Facilitate the Monograph Firm Order Workflow
NCSU Libraries recently implemented the CORAL ERMS for managing firm order monograph acquisition workflows. This session reviews the benefits and pitfalls of using an erms to handle both print and electronic monograph firm orders. In the new workflow every firm order request whether received via email, IM, phone call or paper is entered into the erms and assigned to a specific staff member. Staff members receive alerts and a workflow queue of items waiting to be ordered. NCSU Libraries found that using CORAL led to fewer lost firm order requests, fewer failed patron holds for print material, and fewer failed activations for electronic books. The NCSU Libraries also identified potential enhancements to the system which will allow the CORAL ERMS to manage print and electronic resources for both monograph and serials units within a single application. This project is a positive example of a monographs unit participating in an erms environment historically the realm of serials and ejournal managers. Attendees will learn how a versatile and low cost workflow tool has improved the processing and tracking of monograph orders and created a more efficient and expedient process. Attendees will leave the meeting contemplating the benefits a workflow tool can bring to their firm order acquisition processes. Attendees will also leave the meeting with sufficient information to begin investigating coral as a potential tool for their local environment.

Speakers
BH

Benjamin Heet

Electronic Resources Librarian, North Carolina State University Libraries
avatar for Christee  Pascale

Christee Pascale

Associate Head, NC State University Libraries
Christee Pascale is the Associate Head of Acquisitions and Discovery at North Carolina State University Libraries, where her responsibilities include leading the Monograph Unit staff of eight and overseeing the acquisition, licensing and cataloging for the Libraries $2 million dollar monographs budget, as well as managing Departmental acquisitions, metadata and vendor initiatives. The Acquisitions and Discovery Department is responsible for the... Read More →


Thursday November 6, 2014 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cypress Grand Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:00pm

Charleston Conference Reception
Sponsored by Gale

Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception this year will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium.  Delicious lowcountry specialties as well as more familiar reception fare, will be served.

OPEN MIKE: CHARLESTON'S GOT TALENT

New for 2014, the reception will feature an Open Mike event. Each performance will be 15-20 minutes and you will need to register in order to perform. This will not be a Karaoke event but you can bring a CD to sing along with.

To register just contact one of the following folks:
  • Jack Montgomery at jack.montgomery@wku.edu
  • Scott Plutchak at tscott@uab.edu
  • Leah Hinds at hindsl@gmail.com

BOOK SIGNING

We are very excited to launch the latest book in the Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences series:Reimagining Reference in the 21st Century. To celebrate, John Dove and Dave Tyckoson, editors, will be on hand for a book signing at the reception. 
Purdue University Press will also have a table in the lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel near the registration check-in desk with copies of the book for sale, along with several volumes of Charleston Conference Proceedings, at a discount to conference attendees.

We look forward to seeing you there! 

Thursday November 6, 2014 7:00pm - 9:00pm
South Carolina Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Friday, November 7
 

7:00am

Continental Breakfast
Friday November 7, 2014 7:00am - 8:00am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:00am

Opening Remarks
Overflow seating available in the Gold Ballroom and Colonial Ballroom 

Speakers
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston


Friday November 7, 2014 8:00am - 8:05am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:05am

Hyde Park Debate - Resolved: Wherever possible, library collections should be shaped by patrons, instead of by librarians.
Opening and Closing Poll Results
Opening Statement by Rick Anderson
Opening Statement by David Magier

Response from Rick Anderson
Response from David Magier

In Favor: Rick Anderson, University of Utah
Opposed: David Magier, Princeton University

The debate will be conducted in general accordance with Oxford Union rules. All in the audience will vote their opinion on the resolution before the debate begins, and the vote totals will be recorded. Each speaker will offer a formal opening statement, followed by a response to each other's statements, and then we'll open the floor to discussion. At the conclusion of the debate, another vote will be taken. The winner of the debate is the one who caused the most audience members to change their votes. Members of the audience have an opportunity to make comments and pose questions as well. Join us for what is sure to be a lively discussion, and come ready to share your opinions!

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
avatar for David Magier

David Magier

Associate University Librarian for Collection Development, Princeton University
David Magier was appointed Associate University Librarian for Collection Development at Princeton University Library in April 2008. A specialist in South Asian Studies, he previously served for 21 years as South/ Southeast Asia Librarian and Director of Area Studies at Columbia University Libraries. He also served as Director of the Center for Human Rights Documentation and Research at Columbia. At Princeton, Dr.Magier is responsible for... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 8:05am - 8:45am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:45am

What Faculty Want Librarians to Know
Slides from Phil Richerme

What's happening on the front lines? When academics use their libraries, what do they use? When they talk about them, what do they say? A panel of rising star academics from diverse fields will tell it like it is: how they use their libraries, how they don't use them, and what they'd like to get from their libraries that they don't now get.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Fair

Christine Fair

Assistant Professor of Security Studies, Georgetown University
C. Christine Fair obtained her PhD from the University of Chicago, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations in 2004 and an MA from the Harris School of Public Policy in 1997. Prior to joining the Security Studies Program (SSP) within Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, she served as a senior political scientist with the RAND Corporation, a political officer to the United Nations Assistance Mission... Read More →
avatar for Timothy Johnson

Timothy Johnson

Chair of Classics, College of Charleston
In addition to directing South Carolina’s most comprehensive Classics Department, Dr. Tim Johnson is a recognized scholar-teacher in the area of Classical lyric poetry. Among his publications are two books on the Roman lyricist Horace, the first of which was named by Choice as an Outstanding Academic Title (2005). Professor Johnson has also edited a special collection on Homer for Classical World and served as... Read More →
avatar for James O'Donnell

James O'Donnell

University Librarian & Professor, Arizona State University Libraries
James J. O'Donnell is the University Librarian at ASU Libraries.He has published widely on the history and culture of the late antique Mediterranean world and is a recognized innovator in the application of networked information technology in higher education. In 1990, he co-founded Bryn Mawr Classical Review, the second on-line scholarly journal in the humanities ever created. In 1994, he taught an Internet-based seminar on the work of Augustine... Read More →
avatar for Phil Richerme

Phil Richerme

Postdoctoral Researcher, Joint Quantum Institute
Phil Richerme is a post-doctoral fellow working with Prof. Chris Monroe at the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland.  His research interests include quantum simulation of interacting many-body systems; cryogenic ion traps for large-scale quantum information processing; and new ion trap geometries and methods for 2-dimension and 3-dimensional systems.  His BS in Physics (with a minor in Music) is from MIT, his Ph.D. from... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 8:45am - 10:00am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:00am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by ProQuest.


Friday November 7, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Let’s Talk: Bringing Many Threads Together to Weave the Scholarly Information Eco-system
The OSTP directive (2/22/13) to make peer reviewed articles and data resulting from research funded by federal agencies publicly accessible inspired several new initiatives, most notably the SHARE project being developed by university and library groups; and the publishing community-offered CHORUS project. Although these approaches were initially developed independently (and viewed by some as competing), many of those involved have come to see them as potentially complementary. In the months since, there has been considerable conversation among people involved in these and various related initiatives about bringing these together to help make sense of a broad-based information ecosystem.

In this informal and interactive session, speakers affiliated with each of these will discuss commonalities, opportunities for collaboration, and the desirability of bringing all stakeholders in the scholarly communication community together to develop systems that can address the common interests of the general public and all those concerned about the advancement of scholarship.

Format: No presentations. A facilitated, unscripted, conversation among the participants (with audience participation) touching on areas of agreement & disagreement, possible collaborative approaches and both complementary and divergent visions for the scholarly communication system of the future.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Goodman

Laurie Goodman

Editor-in-Chief, GigaScience
I have worked in the field of Scientific Publishing since I completed my Post Doctoral studies in 1995. I currently serve as Editor-in-Chief for the international open-access open-data journal GigaScience that focuses on big data studies in the life sciences. This is an innovative journal developed and published through a collaboration between BGI (the largest genomics institution in the world) and the open access publisher BioMed Central. This... Read More →
avatar for T. Scott Plutchak

T. Scott Plutchak

Director, Lister Hill Library of Health Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham
T. Scott Plutchak is Director of Digital Data Curation Strategies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).  In that capacity he works with units throughout the university to develop institutional policies and services for the management and curation of research data.  From 1995 to 2014 he was the Director of UAB’s Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.  Prior to that he was Associate Director and then Director... Read More →
avatar for Howard Ratner

Howard Ratner

Executive Director, CHORUS
I am passionate about constantly improving the scholarly communications ecosystem with standards and technology. My most recent endeavor is CHORUS - the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States. I was CTO and Executive Vice President, Nature Publishing Group, and was instrumental in the founding of such not-for-profit joint ventures as CrossRef, the collaborative reference linking service between the world’s scholarly publishing... Read More →
avatar for Greg Tananbaum

Greg Tananbaum

Owner, ScholarNext Consulting
Greg Tananbaum serves as a consultant to publishers, libraries, universities, and information providers as owner of ScholarNext (www.scholarnext.com). ScholarNext clients include Facebook, Microsoft, SPARC, Meta, and Annual Reviews.  He has been President of The Berkeley Electronic Press, as well as Director of Product Marketing for EndNote. Greg writes a regular column in Against the Grain covering emerging developments in the field of... Read More →
JV

John Vaughn

Executive Vice President, Association of American Universities
John Vaughn has serve as EVP of the AAU since 1996, He is general deputy to the president and COO of the organization, but he has a particular portfolio and interest in the areas of intellectual property, information technology, research libraries and scholarly communication. He has had broad engagement with research libraries and involvement in many initiatives concerning them.


Friday November 7, 2014 10:30am - 11:15am
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Price Control and the Publisher: Paperbacks, Book Clubs, and the American Net Book Agreement, 1840-1940
In this retrospective survey we'll see how the American book-publishing industry struggled with price control—beginning with the paperback price wars of the 1840s and 1880s, continuing with the unsuccessful Net Book Agreement of the early 1900s, advancing to the arrival of book clubs in the 1920s, and ending with the success of paperback publishing in the late 1930s. Throughout this period, U.S. publishers were keen to adopt new manufacturing technologies and to expand their markets, but they fought hard to maintain prices and to control distribution in order to protect bookshop owners (and themselves) from price cutting. All of this sounds familiar today, given the current struggles over the pricing of the ebook and the success of new modes of advertising, selling, and fulfillment via the Internet. This talk will provide historical background and will show that the problems now faced by the industry are certainly not new ones.

Dr. West will be available for a book signing following his presentation near the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel.

Speakers
avatar for James L. W. West, III

James L. W. West, III

Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English, Pennsylvania State University
JAMES L. W. WEST III is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English at Pennsylvania State University. He is a biographer, book historian, and scholarly editor. West is the author of American Authors and the Literary Marketplace (1988), William Styron: A Life (1998) and The Perfect Hour: The Romance of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ginevra King (2005). His most recent book is a collection of essays called Making the... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 10:30am - 11:15am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

To Boldly Go Beyond Downloads
With more scholarly journals being distributed electronically rather than in print form, we know that researchers download many articles. What is less well known is how journal articles are used after they are initially downloaded. To what extent are they saved, uploaded, tweeted, or otherwise shared? How does this reuse increase their total use and value to research and how does it influence library usage figures? University of Tennessee Chancellor’s Professor Carol Tenopir, Professor Suzie Allard, and Adjunct Professor David Nicholas are leading a team of international researchers on a the project, “Beyond Downloads,” funded by a grant from Elsevier. The project will look at how and why scholarly electronic articles are downloaded, saved, and shared by researchers. Sharing in today’s digital environment may include links posted on social media, like Twitter, and in blogs or via e-mail. Having a realistic estimate of this secondary use will help provide a more accurate picture of the total use of scholarly articles. The speakers will present the objectives of the study, share the approach and avenues of exploration, and report on some preliminary findings. Furthermore, the speakers will discuss how the potential learnings could yield benefits to the library community.

Speakers
avatar for Gabriel Hughes

Gabriel Hughes

Vice President of Web Analytics, Elsevier
Gabriel joined Elsevier in April 2013 as VP Analytics, responsible for big data experimentation and analytics, developing new insights and data driven features for digital platforms such as ScienceDirect, Scopus and Mendeley. Prior to Elsevier Gabriel worked at Google for 6 years as Head of Attribution, digital marketing measurement and experimentation technologies which he was instrumental in developing. With over 14 years’ experience in... Read More →
avatar for Carol Tenopir

Carol Tenopir

Chancellor’s Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
A frequent speaker at professional conferences and prolific author, Carol Tenopir is a Chancellor's Professor and Director of the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee. She is on the Board of Directors for project COUNTER and the Principal Investigator for research projects that investigate measuring the value and outcomes from scholarly reading and data management.


Friday November 7, 2014 10:30am - 11:15am
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Bringing the Global Open Knowledgebase to Life: Development, Data Collection, and Integrations
The Global Open Knowledgebase (GOKb) project is developing a repository of freely available data that describes electronic journals and books as they are offered in the academic publishing supply chain. GOKb builds on existing knowledge base standards and best practices, including KBART, in addition to offering an enhanced data model, tools for community management, and open data available under a Creative Commons license. GOKb will fill a new role in the knowledge base ecosystem by providing opportunities for users to take ownership of its data and incorporate it freely into their products and services.

Since the first partners release in May 2014, the project has taken major steps toward realizing the benefits of these features. Librarians from the partner institutions have begun harvesting and ingesting data from priority publishers and content providers. The development team has been working to identify new features and enhancements. Several partner projects, including KB+ and Kuali OLE, have been piloting integrations with GOKb. And the project has been pursuing a second round of development, which will include an expansion of GOKb’s scope to include ebooks and linked data.

This presentation will include a general project overview and update, followed by practical demonstrations of data collection, integration, and development initiatives that are already underway among the project partners. Discussion of challenges, successes, and lessons learned from each facet of the project will be embedded throughout the presentation. Attendees will also learn about next steps for GOKb and opportunities for broader community involvement.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Wilson

Kristen Wilson

Associate Head of Acquisitions & Discovery, North Carolina State University
Kristen Wilson is Associate Head of Acquisitions and Discovery at the North Carolina State University Libraries. She manages the department's serials unit and serves as principal investigator for the Global Open Knowledgebase (GOKb) project. Her areas of professional interest include knowledge bases, electronic resources management systems, and workflow mapping and analysis.


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Evidence-Based eBook Purchasing: Results and Implications from a Consortia-Publisher Initiative
With libraries under increasing financial pressure to demonstrate value in their collections, the University of California (UC) explores adopting a value methodology that had origins in evaluating journal packages, taking into account utility, quality, and cost-effectiveness. Reviewing a publisher’s eBook package by imprint year and determining how best to select content based on users’ needs becomes more complicated when a library wants strong licensing terms and to be fiscally responsible. As a publisher, T&F understands these challenges as well as the need to offer a variety of creative purchasing options to meet libraries’ varying needs. To this end, the UC engaged with Taylor & Francis Group to use evidence-based acquisitions as one method of acquiring CRCnetBASE eBook content. CRCnetBASE is T&F’s STEM content eBook platform, containing over 12,000+ titles in over 350 subject areas and 36 distinct collections.

We will discuss the challenges and opportunities provided by such a model, as well as lessons learned. For monographs, new applications are needed and evidence-based purchasing provides options supporting why and how UC users integrate books into their academic work. By having such alternatives, observing what is being read, libraries can determine what content to purchase and retain. This evidence-based method reaffirms how libraries have evolved from acquiring content based on perceptions and anticipated needs to more efficiently analyzing resource investments defined by use and publishers can more actively engage in the process by providing more effective data points. From a publisher’s perspective, this experience revealed the need for refined internal processes, efficient and timely addition of metadata, and fast and accurate usage statistics. It also highlighted the necessity of giving sufficient time for newly-published titles to be discovered. And finally, it showed the promise of offering greater control to libraries with a measure of predictability for publishers with a pre-agreed spend amount.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies to promote better, more sustainable and more affordable online access best described as new potential in scholarly communication practices.  
avatar for Susan Sanders

Susan Sanders

Account Manager, Western Region for eBooks & Digital Content Sales, Taylor & Francis


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Extreme Sharing: The Manhattan Research Library Initiative (MaRLI)
What do you get when you forge a collaboration between a public library and two private, research institutions, combine their collections of nearly 65 million items and open it all up to a population of potentially 17 million patrons? Extreme sharing. This session will cover the ideas and forces that gave rise to the Manhattan Research Library Initiative (MaRLI). We’ll discuss why it’s significant that a researcher at Columbia or NYU can now walk into the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building of the New York Public Library and walk out with a book from NYPL’s previously non-circulating research collection. And we’ll talk about the risks involved, both real and perceived, of opening to the masses the heretofore restricted collections of NYU and Columbia. We’ll walk through some of the goals of the collaboration, angled specifically from a collection development standpoint – namely, to better serve our researchers by expanding the collections available at all three institutions; eliminating (or at least reducing) overlap of specialized materials; and identifying opportunities for shared collecting. We’ll describe the process a researcher must go through to become ‘vetted’ for cross-institutional access. We’ll provide data on the number of researchers who have registered and how many items they have requested. Working with a range of publishers and vendors, the collection development officers at all three institutions have successfully worked through differences in collecting strategies to forge opportunities for making available to their patrons a wide range of material, including low-use scholarly monographs and sparsely held collections of foreign material. We’ll discuss strategies for joint acquisition of e-Resources, particularly eBook collections and will wrap up with a discussion about strategies the group is considering for the future. Time will be allotted for questions and discussion toward the end of the session.

Speakers
AC

Angela Carreno

Head of Collection Development, New York University
Angela M. Carreño is the head of collection development for the Division of Libraries at New York University (NY). Angela has led, coordinated, and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of Libraries and assumes primary responsibility for consortial collection development commitments. She represents the Libraries on collaborative... Read More →
JC

Jeff Carroll

Director, Collection Development, Columbia University
avatar for Denise Hibay

Denise Hibay

Susan and Douglas Dillon Head of Collection Development, New York Public Library
Since 2009, DENISE HIBAY has served as the Susan and Douglas Dillon Head of Collection Development at The New York Public Library, where she provides leadership and oversight for the ongoing development and management of the Library’s research collections and budgets, coordinates and supervises the work of curators and selectors, and manages the transition of content from print to online formats.  Since joining NYPL in 1987, she has... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Filling the Physical or the Virtual Stacks? Assessing the Value of Electronic Course Adopted Books in Comparison with their Print Counterparts.
As libraries’ e-books collections reach critical mass, there is a growing need to assess their value, not only with respect to cost, but also in comparison with the print book collections. Do library users tend to prefer print or e-books? What factors influence those choices? To answer these questions and to help focus our collection development strategies, Claremont Colleges Library conducted a comparative usage study in three stages - across three semesters, focusing on a sample of Course Adopted Books containing the same titles, available in both print and electronic format. These samples represent a unique research opportunity to examine and contrast the usage statistics for each of the two formats, while reducing the variations in preference due to factors like desirability and relevancy of the content, or nature and urgency of the information need. This presentation will reveal some of the most interesting and unexpected results that emerged from the third stage of the study and compare them with the data from the first two stages. It will also examine the methodology used to compare usage of print to electronic books, and the presenter hopes to provoke a discussion regarding her approach, given the challenges of working with data of different nature. In closing, the presentation will touch on some of the ways Claremont Colleges Library correlates the results of the study with qualitative survey data collected during the same period of time, in order to better understand the factors that influence user preferences and behaviour with respect to format choices.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Savova

Maria Savova

Director of Inforation Resources and Systems, Claremont University Consortium
Maria oversees the Library's Materials budget and has broad responsibilities for leading the library’s strategy in funding, selecting, and managing information resources for the Claremont Colleges’ user community. She is also responsible for developing innovative, user-centered, customized approaches to acquiring information resources and facilitating their discovery by users.


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Gift-Gaining: Ideas for Effective Gift Processing
In 2014, personnel turnover and other factors led the University of North Texas Libraries to re-purpose staffing to process gift items. None of the new personnel had experience in evaluating gifts. As the reassigned personnel began its work, it became clear that intensive training and a reevaluation of procedures was necessary for effective processing of these materials. This session will look at the issues that arose and the solutions that emerged from the reevaluation. Told from the perspective of the new gifts coordinator, this session will present a case study that will provide attendees with examples they can implement and avoid as they evaluate their own gift policies. Attendees will also be asked to share some of their own experiences in dealing with gift processing in their libraries.

Speakers
MH

Mark Henley

Contracts Librarian, University of North Texas
Mark Henely works in the Collection Development department at the University of North Texas Libraries.


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Bridgeview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

How Users’ Perceptions of E-Books Have Changed – or Not: Comparing Parallel Survey Responses
The study of e-books and how they are accessed and used has been a popular area of research for several years now. This presentation will directly compare results from an e-book use survey of college and university library users in the state of Florida conducted by the University of Florida in 2009 to a new companion survey to be conducted in 2014. The team will frame this comparison in a broader context by drawing upon other survey data published on e-book use in academic libraries. It is hypothesized that it will be useful to look at past and current survey responses to provide insight on changes to key issues and developing trends in e-book use. At various points during the presentation the team will engage the audience to respond to key survey questions using live polling software and instantaneously compare and contrast those results to the survey data as a whole. The presentation will conclude with a summary of the research and highlights from survey user responses.

Speakers
CB

Cecilia Botero

Associate Dean, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida
SC

Steven Carrico

Acq Librarian, University of Florida
Steven Carrico has been employed as an Acquisitions Librarian at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries since 1994. He has authored or co-authored a wide range of refereed and non-refereed journal articles, book reviews, bibliographies, and three monograph chapters (in ALA Editions, Haworth Press, and Chandos Publishing). Steve has presented at several conferences and serves or has served on numerous national and state library... Read More →
avatar for Tara Tobin Cataldo, MLS

Tara Tobin Cataldo, MLS

Collections Coordinator, Marston Science Library, University of Florida
I am the Collections Coordinator at UF's Marston Science Library and subject specialist in the Biological and Life Sciences. I have been an academic librarian for 15 years and my research interests include information seeking behavior and usage patterns of library collections.
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
I am the E-Resources & Acqusitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. I have been with the Smathers Libraries since 2010, and in my current role since 2012. I received my MLS from the University of South Florida in 2009. My primary research focus is cost, use, and usage studies of e-resources, particularly pertaining to data driven decision making. I am also interested in acquisition/e-resource workflow... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Mediated Demand Driven Acquisition: Method or Madness?
Memorial University Libraries initiated a Demand Driven Acquisitions pilot project in January 2013. Given the apparent pervasiveness of PDA/DDA projects in academic libraries, we anticipated a relatively straightforward implementation process and long-term application of the acquisitions model in our library. We partnered with our primary book vendor and, to date, we have added over 29,000 DDA records from three e-book aggregators, generated over 1900 short-term loans, purchased 80 e-books, and spent over $48,000. But none of this came easily. Through the process of trial and error, we have had to face the difficulties of blending slip profiles of a four branch mid-size university library system into a functional DDA profile, of maintaining accurate data in our ILS and book vendor’s database, of managing publisher withdrawals, of monitoring price increases and of removing thousands of records from our ILS (SirsiDynix Symphony 3.4.1). DDA has created many challenges while giving the library an opportunity to shine on campus with its patron responsiveness and fiscal restraint. During this session we plan to highlight the implementation and maintenance of our DDA project, how and why we adapted the traditional models to include mediated firm order purchasing, the challenges we face, what we learned, and our concerns for the future of this popular initiative at our library. We will also comment on the recent NISO DDA document and provide our own recommendations for libraries and publishers who participate in DDA programs.

Speakers
SF

Sue Fahey

Head, Serials & Acquisitions, Memorial University of Newfoundland
DK

Dianne Keeping

Collection Development Librarian, Memorial University of Newfoundland


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Privacy in the Digital Age: Publishers, Libraries and Higher Education
Slides from Helen Cullyer
Slides from Tracy Mitrano

Universities and colleges are collecting and analyzing increasing quantities of personal digital data about their faculty, students and staff, while academic publishers and libraries are beginning to track the online behavior of consumers and users of scholarly resources. On the one hand, these activities are essential tools for institutions and organizations as they strive to diversify their workforces and / or student populations, improve educational, student, and library services, and enhance the marketing and discoverability of scholarly resources. On the other hand, the amount of personal digital data that is now being collected raises a number of concerns about the privacy of individuals. What sorts of data are being collected? To whom are those data made available? How are they being used? And how could they be misused? The aims of this session are to identify some of the most pressing privacy issues facing higher education and in particular the scholarly communications ecosystem; and to begin a discussion about how academic institutions, libraries, academic presses, and funders can work together to develop systems, policies and standards that protect individuals' privacy but enable organizations and institutions to collect and analyze personal data so that they can fulfill their missions more effectively.

Moderators
avatar for Joseph J. Esposito

Joseph J. Esposito

President, Processed Media
I am a management consultant working in the area of publishing, especially scholarly publishing, and digital media. I work with for-profit and not-for-profit companies. Most of my clients are CEOs or Boards of Directors, whom I advise on strategy. My aim is to help organizations make decisions. Good decisions cost more.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
HC

Helen Cullyer

Program Officer in Scholarly Communications, Mellon Foundation
Helen Cullyer is program officer in the Scholarly Communications Program of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation  She works closely with Senior Program Officer Donald J. Waters on developing new grantmaking initiatives and reviewing grant proposals in the areas of scholarly publication, preservation, and access and library services.  She also works with program staff on the evaluation and assessment of grant-funded projects.  Ms... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Mitrano

Tracy Mitrano

Director of IT Policy and Institute for Computer Policy and Law, Cornell University
Tracy Mitrano is the director of IT Policy and Institute for Computer Policy and Law. Currently she is on the boards of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education, Teach Privacy, Cornell Daily Sun (the independent student newspaper at Cornell University), the Tompkins County Broadband Committee, Tompkins County Public Library and is co-chair of the Hawkins Leadership Roundtable for EDUCAUSE. A graduate and faculty member... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Putting your Patrons in the Driver's Seat: Online Video Use, PDA, and ROI
Today, more than 90 per cent of Americans are watching over 40 Billion online videos each month. Netflix and YouTube alone account for 50 per cent of all internet download traffic during peak hours. So why, if online video is consuming our personal lives, do we see such limited use or discussion of online video once we walk on campuses? Why do we see innovations such as Patron-Driven-Acquisition become the norm for eBooks acquisitions, yet remain unchartered territory for eVideos?

The session explores the status of online video on campuses today – the growing and changing usage behavior of students and faculty, the opportunities for new acquisition models, and the Return on Investment for Libraries. Simmons College (5,000 FTE) and the University of Massachusetts-Amherst (29,000 FTE) launched pilot projects in 2013 to explore the possibility for online video PDA, in collaboration with two Australian colleges – Queensland University of Technology (40,000 FTE) and La Trobe University (33,000 FTE). The four colleges have since compiled over 3 years of data to understand not only how students and faculty are engaging with online video in and outside of the classroom across campuses of different size and nationality, but also how PDA may be effectively employed as a model of acquisition.

The presentation is split into three sections: (1) User Behavior: combining usage statistics with the results of student, faculty and librarian surveys (2,000 responses) and promotional campaigns to better understand how users are engaging with online video; (2) Acquisition models: presenting over 3 years of data from various models of acquisition – individual title selection, collection subscription, and PDA – to compare relative performance; (3) Return on Investment: using a ROI methodology to compare the value of different video resources (DVD and online) and acquisition models, and compare this to other library resources (eBooks, eJournals, etc).

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Ferguson

Jennifer Ferguson

Liaison Librarian, Simmons College
Jennifer Ferguson is the Liaison Librarian for Arts, Humanities and Careers at the Beatley Library of Simmons College and provides research, instruction, content and collection development services to undergraduates, graduate students and faculty. Jennifer has presented at regional and national conferences on a wide array of topics, including designing library space, marketing and outreach, streaming media, collection development and information... Read More →
avatar for Scott Stangroom

Scott Stangroom

Acquisitions Coordinator, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
University of Massachusetts - Amherst


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

ROAD: A New Free Service for Identifying and Selecting OA Scholarly Resources

ROAD, the Directory of Open Access scholarly Resources, was launched by the ISSN International Centre in December 2013 with the support of the Communication and Information Sector of UNESCO. This new directory aims to give an overview of the production of OA resources worldwide covering all those resources that can be identified by an ISSN such as, journals, conference proceedings, monographic series and academic repositories.  The primary goals of ROAD can be described as:

 

  • The provision of statistical information of OA resources for example subject coverage, geographical coverage, where OA is being published and by whom.
  • The service also aims to help users whether they are students and researchers, public bodies in charge of the funding and evaluation of the research or journalists, librarians and information scientists to determine the coverage of OA resources by indexing and abstracting services and to know, when appropriate, the ranking of these resources by journal indicators. Enabling people to select OA resources of good quality.

 

ROAD is a free and multidisciplinary database which is based on ISSN bibliographic records and produced in conjunction with a number of partners (Scopus, Linguistics Abstracts, EconLit, DOAJ, Medline, SNIP, SJR...) who share their coverage lists with the ISSN International Centre. Their data is subsequently used to enrich the records in ROAD.  Currently available as a beta version (http://road.issn.org), ROAD will switch to a full service at the end of 2014.

The presentation will explain the origins of the project (recurring questions about the quality of OA resources and about the role of the ISSN as an identifier, UNESCO’s need for statistics about OA in the world), the target audience and the use cases, the main features of the service and also the role of the ISSN as a matching key for gathering information taken from various sources. It will also explain the role of ROAD as a "laboratory" for further ISSN projects, in particular for exposing ISSN records as linked data.

The ISSN International Centre is an intergovernmental organization responsible for maintaining and publishing the ISSN International Register, the reference bibliographic database for the identification of serials and continuing resources. It is also the coordinator of the 88 National Centres charged to identify serials worldwide.

The Communication and Information Sector (CI) of UNESCO was established in its present form in 1990. Its programmes are rooted in UNESCO’s Constitution, which requires the Organization to promote the “free flow of ideas by word and image.”


Speakers
avatar for Francois-Xavier Pelegrin

Francois-Xavier Pelegrin

Head of the Bibliographic Data Section, ISSN International Centre
Francois-Xavier Pelegrin coordinates the bibliographic activities of the 88 ISSN National Centres. He is also liaison member with the FRBR Review Group and the ISBD Review Group (IFLA), co-author of the PRESSoo bibliographic model for serials, and responsible for ROAD, the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources. He was formerly internet projects manager at The French Office of legal and administrative information.


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Self Published Content and Approval Plans : An Open Discussion of Best Practices in Identifying Self Publishing Services and Content for Libraries
One of the biggest challenges today with the rise of so much self-published content is to identify which titles to add to the library’s collection. Additionally, where are librarians referring patrons seeking self publishing services? For both academic and public libraries that are collecting self-published materials, how are they deciding what to purchase? If they are using vendors or review sources to vet titles, which ones are doing this the best? The purpose of this session is to review best practices related to self publishing services and content to arrive at a reliable model that works with traditional library functions.

Speakers
avatar for IngramSpark

IngramSpark

Senior Independent Publisher Manager - IngramSpark, Ingram Spark
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President, Product Development, Ingram Library Services
Bob Nardini is Vice President, Product Development at Ingram Coutts.  He worked in both public and academic libraries prior to 1985, when he took a job in the academic bookselling industry, where he has been ever since.  In 2007 Nardini joined Coutts and since then has been involved in several areas of the company’s activity, including the development of the OASIS® and ipage® customer sites,  the MyiLibrary®... Read More →
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Subject Liaison’s Guide to the Backroom: What Every New Liaison Needs to Know About Technical Services Processes
Academic library liaison models - where librarians assume a variety of responsibilities beyond providing standard reference and research help - have become common in all types of higher education institutions. Subject liaisons frequently add collection development to their list of duties undertaken in addition to discipline-specific research assistance. These collection responsibilities require librarians to develop not only a vision based on the philosophical aspects of collection building, but also an understanding of nitty-gritty technical aspects related to selecting and acquiring resources. New liaisons may be familiar from coursework or through professional experience with philosophical aspects of collections; however, the technical side of collection development and acquisitions is often completely new territory and can result in learn-as-you-go training.

In this session, a science liaison and technical services department head will discuss the importance of liaisons developing an understanding of technical services processes. We’ll discuss why liaisons’ knowledge of these technical areas and procedures benefits both liaisons and their technical services colleagues, and we will provide a framework for creating technical services training specifically intended for liaisons. This framework will go beyond building familiarity with collection development policies (still important!) and “submit orders here” to get at the what-is-done and why-it-matters-to-liaisons aspects of acquisitions and collection development. New liaisons will leave the session with a list of practical things to know and questions to ask as they begin collection development responsibilities. Audience participation in building a “I wish they/I knew” statement list for new liaisons as it relates to technical services will be solicited.

Speakers
avatar for Timothy Carstens

Timothy Carstens

Department Head/Associate Dean, Western Carolina University
Tim Carstens graduated from Colby College with a BA in Philosophy/Religion in 1982.  He received his MLS from Rutgers University in 1984.  He was a monographic cataloger at North Carolina State University from 1984 until 1990.  He has worked for Western Carolina University’s Hunter Library in Cullowhee, NC since 1990. He served as Head of the Cataloging and Acquisitions Unit until 2010.  He then served as Head of the... Read More →
avatar for Krista Schmidt

Krista Schmidt

Research and Instruction Librarian/STEM Liaison, Western Carolina University
Krista Schmidt is a research and instruction librarian at Hunter Library, Western Carolina University. She serves as the liaison to all STEM disciplines and also wears the mantle of maps librarian.


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

11:30am

Sustainability, not Profitability: the Future of Scholarly Monographs and STL
Concern about the sustainability of scholarly monograph publishing is nothing new. Long-form scholarship, while crucial to the academy, is expensive to produce and often finds only a very small audience of readers. For most of the history of scholarly book publishing, universities helped support the cost of publication, and academic libraries purchased a large enough portion of an initial print run to make book publishing sustainable. Libraries have long had collection development strategies that allowed for purchasing monographs “just in case.” The introduction of e-books allowed for the development of demand-driven acquisition (DDA), which allows libraries to only purchase books with demonstrated need, and of the short-term loan (STL), which allows libraries to pay for temporary access of lower use monographs. This model has made it possible for libraries to present bigger collections to their users than would be possible under traditional models, but publishers have seen radically decreased revenues as STL programs have expanded – something that impacts their ability to continue to publish scholarly monographs. Recent decisions by some publishers to raise STL fees highlight the challenges facing all participants in the scholarly communication ecosystem. A monograph that does not recoup the costs associated with its production cannot be published – something that impacts scholars at all of our institutions. This panel of publishers, librarians, and an approval vendor will share data and experiences to help lead to greater mutual understanding, and which will hopefully help make long-form scholarly publishing sustainable in this new era.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
BK

Barbara Kawecki

Director of Sales, Western US, YBP Library Services
Barbara Kawecki, Director of Sales, Western U.S., is responsible for the management and growth of YBP business throughout the western U.S. Barbara has more than 23 years of experience selling information products and services into the academic library market. She has served at YBP as Senior Digital Content Sales Manager in the Western U.S. from 2010 to 2013 and prior to that worked as a Senior Collection Development Manager in the same... Read More →
avatar for Emily McElroy

Emily McElroy

Director, University of Nebraska Medical Center Library, University of Nebraska
avatar for Lisa Nachtigall

Lisa Nachtigall

Director, Sales Development, Wiley
I joined Wiley in 2010 and am currently Director of Sales Development, Digital Books. In this global role, I am responsible for the strategies and partnerships which drive digital book sales. My primary focus is on library channels. In addition to the development of sales and pricing models for Wiley Online Library, I also set Wiley’s strategies for delivering content via ebook aggregators. Prior to joining Wiley I led Oxford University... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Senior Director, Institutional Sales, Americas, Oxford University Press
Rebecca Seger is the Senior Director for Institutional Sales at Oxford University Press USA.  She has been working with libraries for her entire career, currently leading the OUP team that works with, and sells, to all types of libraries and consortia in North and South America.  Rebecca has been with OUP for 14 years, and has focused on the product development, sales and marketing of ebooks, databases and journals to and for the academic and... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

The Importance of Being Resourceful: One Library’s Assessment Adventure
How one budget strapped university library and an earnest library science intern created a viable collection assessment plan in a month. Companies that provide collection evaluation services are a wonderful option, but when your library budget won’t allow additional expenditures, how can you still keep your library collection robust and current? An internship learning opportunity was the impetus that inspired a complete collection assessment of our monograph collection. Many libraries are in similar tight budget situations. This program will present how one university library utilized current collection assessment best practices, Excel spreadsheets, the Voyager ILS, and a library science intern to cull the herd of unused and outdated books in slightly less than a month. The project resulted in an unanticipated assessment of our historical collection development practices and the need to create a communication plan for the faculty regarding this project.

Through open discussion and active participation, program attendees will understand the effective collection assessment methods, the importance of mentoring library science interns and how much a library can benefit from their ingenuity and dedication. Participants who are now required to accomplish more with less will be inspired to think creatively for ways they may be able to begin a collection assessment fast and economically while using their own ILS reporting system and the homegrown talent, earnestness, and tenacity already in the library.

Speakers
avatar for Rhonda Donaldson

Rhonda Donaldson

Coordinator of E-Resources & Collection Development, Shepherd University
Coordinator of Electronic Resources and Collection Development @ Shepherd University in the eastern panhandle of WV.
avatar for Theresa Smith

Theresa Smith

Public Services Manager, Shepherd University
I've worked in the public services department of Scarborough Library for close to 25 years. I recently decided to work on my library science degree and am currently in my last semester of an online program through Clarion University. I've learned a lot from my classes and plan to share what I learned during my internship about informal collection assessment.
AW

Ann Watson

Dean of Library, Shepherd University
Ann M. Watson, Dean of the Library at Shepherd University, received a BA in History from West Virginia University, a Masters of Library & Information Science from Kent State University and a MA in Education from The Ohio State University. She also completed the Harvard Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians. Before coming to Shepherd University, Ann worked as Library Director at Ohio University Lancaster and also held various library... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

The Importance of PESC – an emerging NISO Recommended Practice
PESC (Protocol for Exchanging Serial Content) is a NISO Working group approved in May, 2013, that will recommend a practice for the exchange of serial/periodical content. The nineteen member group, led by co-chairs from NARA and NIST, had their first meeting in September 2013, and began by sharing packaging and submission guidelines currently in use and later dividing into subgroups to focus on use cases and conformance within the recommended practice. The PESC Working group will have been meeting for just over a year by the time of the Charleston Conference, and it will be a great opportunity to present the groups’ progress to the attendees. Libraries, archives, indexing services, content aggregators, publishers, and content creators all need to exchange serials data and work with digital files of serials. These may be text based, image based, text with images, or some other combination. The file formats may be XML, EPUB, HTML, PDF, ONIX, etc. And the recipient of the files needs to be able to accommodate the various data and formats if they are to incorporate that serial content into their product or service. Having a recommended practice will improve the interactions between and among these constituents, resulting in a better end-result. Several other NISO and ISO committees and working groups are related in some way to PESC, including ISO/IEC CD 21320-1 (Information technology – Document Container File) and NISO’s Supplementary Materials for Journal Articles. The session will examine plans to ensure that the recommendations aren’t contradictory with other standards, and look at the next steps as PESC works towards their 18 month goal to deliver the recommendation. Questions and comments from the audience will be encouraged.Note: A PESC session was presented at NASIG; however we were not very far along at that point.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Kaplan

Laurie Kaplan

Sr. Project Manager, ProQuest
Laurie Kaplan, as Director of Editorial Operations at ProQuest, facilitates efforts of the international database and the Serials Provider Relations teams. Throughout her career of over a decade at ProQuest, Laurie has successfully directed the international data team responsible for Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, Ulrich’s Web, and the multinational databases in 360 Core. Prior to joining ProQuest, Laurie worked in legal directory... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

We’re E-Preferred. Why Did We Get That Book in Print?
While California State University, Fullerton’s Pollak Library has an e-preferred approval plan for all subject areas, the Library still continues to receive a number of print titles on approval. However, 25% of the print approval books received in the 2013-14 fiscal year were published by only eight publishers, all of which actively publish their books in e-format. This presentation will investigate the reasons why print books were supplied over potentially available e-versions. In some cases, individual titles were only published in print, while others were available as ebooks, but could only be purchased within collections. Others were available for purchase as individual ebooks, but not via the Library’s primary aggregator. Attendees will be engaged in discussion on what steps could be taken to truly become an e-preferred library despite these inconsistencies.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Roll

Ann Roll

Interim Head, Collection and Processing Services, California State University, Fullerton


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

“Happiness is…Library Automation:” The Rhetoric of Early Library Automation and the Future of Discovery and Academic Libraries
During the second half of the twentieth century, the professional literature of academic librarianship imagined, speculated, and envisioned how impressive technological advancements might affect the future of academic libraries and the profession as a whole. Technology and automation, stalwarts of the Space Age, were portrayed as the panacea for librarians burdened with growing collections and overwhelming clerical processes. Many voices chimed in to predict how mechanization and automation would impact collections, communication, and information retrieval, as well as the role of academic libraries in the future. In this presentation, we will examine how library professionals predicted technology would influence the role of academic libraries in the past and compare these discussions with current conversations about collections, discovery, competition, and the future of academic libraries. This presentation will draw on an analysis of the rhetoric in the professional literature amidst technological advancements, specifically during the automation of the late 1960s to 1970s as libraries transition from the card catalog to the online catalog. By examining the rhetoric of past conversations through the lens of present dialogs, we hope to bring a new perspective, informed by the past, to the professional discourse as ideas regarding collections, discovery, and the future of academic libraries continue to be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor, UIUC
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Lauren Kosrow

Lauren Kosrow

Graduate Student, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

“Hey, I Didn't Order This!”: How to Review Donations from Self-Published Authors
The scholar gypsy who remains active in his field but can't find a publisher. The university employee whose hobby is writing romance novels. The alumnus with a law degree who also writes poetry. What do they have in common? They all have self-published works that they want your library to make available to its patrons! Often authors provide a “free” copy to the library for just that purpose. But considering self-published books for addition to the collection can be more difficult than other donation scenarios for two main reasons:
  1. The donations are deeply personal in nature; the authors of the materials have invested their own time and finances into both publishing them and making them available to the library.
  2. Self-published materials lack the same editorial control and credible reviews that often accompany commercially published books donated to a library. Reliable, objective reviews of self-published works can be tough to find, and most libraries are not equipped to conduct a thorough review process for each donation.
So what to do? Preliminary research of collection development gift policies in academic libraries reveals little specificity regarding self-published works; an addendum to a traditional gift policy may be required. Additionally, librarians need a gently-worded “boilerplate rejection” for items they choose not to add—one different from the standard response to other donors. The presenters will share their analysis of collection development gift policies, lead a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of having specific language regarding self-published books in gift or collection development policies, and will make recommendations for the reviewing (and accepting or declining) of donations from self-published authors. Librarians will gain ideas for reviewing donations of self-published works, and self-published authors will glean strategies for donating their work to libraries.

Speakers
HB

Heidi Buchanan

Research & Instruction Librarian, Subject Liaison, Western Carolina University
KG

Katy Ginanni

Collection Development Librarian, Western Carolina University
My jobs in life have included swimming instructor and lifeguard; artist's model; serials acquisitions and electronic resources for several academic libraries; account services, training, and sales manager for a subscription agent; Peace Corps Volunteer; bartender; and, most recently, collection development. I have an M.L.S. from Vanderbilt University and am currently the collection development librarian at Western Carolina University. I'm... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

12:30pm

Collecting and Acquiring in Earnest (The 14th Annual Health Sciences Lively Lunch)
Sponsored by Rittenhouse

Handout from Ramune Kubilius

RSVP Required


In this year's sponsored but no holds barred lunch, host Nicole Gallo will offer a brief greeting, and Ramune Kubilius will provide the traditional “year in review” synopsis of developments since the last Charleston Conference.  Panelists will then share insights and lead discussion on earnest attempts to meet users’ information needs and satisfy administrations’ budget and other expectations. 

No matter how information has become re-packaged, two formats remain important in health sciences communication: books and journals (articles) .Speakers will focus on library experiments with these formats and the discussion will then broaden into other topics and trends.

Is PDA a solution? Yumin Jiang will share some impressions on experiments at her institution with a few e-book PDA/DDA (patron driven or demand driven acquisition) packages. Nichole Gallo will contribute highlights and findings from Rittenhouse health sciences customers’ experience with PDA. Both will then lead a discussion with participants about trends and best practices in e-book collection building. 

What conclusions can be reached from experimentation with and implementation of on-demand article acquisitions? Emma O'Hagan will share insights and experience with journal article “on demand” and “pay per view” services at two institutions. This will jumpstart a discussion with participants on how or when such services might become a major content strategy, impacting (or replacing) more traditional interlibrary loan, collection development, subscription and licensing practices. 

Finally, session moderator Andrea Twiss-Brooks will highlight some other trends. This will serve as a springboard to an expected lively discussion among participants on challenges, both current and looming on the horizon, as well as opportunities, in health sciences information acquisition and provision.

Speakers
NG

Nicole Gallo

Executive Director Sales & Marketing, Rittenhouse
Nicole Gallo is the Executive Director of Sales and Marketing at Rittenhouse Book Distributors. Since 1996, she has held sales, marketing and management positions within the company and currently leads the team in providing access to health sciences print and eBooks, most notably through the R2 Digital Library. | | Nicole is a former board member of the American Medical Publisher’s Association and has served on several Health Science... Read More →
avatar for Yumin Jiang

Yumin Jiang

Department Head, Collection Management, University of Colorado Health Sciences Library
Yumin Jiang has a Master of Science degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She also has a Master of Arts degree in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Prior to joining the University of Colorado Health Sciences Library in 2013, Yumin also worked at the University of Colorado Law Library, the Health Sciences Library System at the University of Pittsburgh, and... Read More →
RK

Ramune K. Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library
Longtime health sciences librarian, member of MLA (Medical Library Association), SLA (Special Libraries Association), also regional and state health sciences library organizations. Involved with Charleston Conference as a program director, conference dine-around host, and recruiter/compiler of conference session “And They Were There” reports for “Against the Grain” (ATG). Active in organizing conference's health sciences Lively Lunches... Read More →
avatar for Emma O'Hagan

Emma O'Hagan

Medical Librarian, Western Michigan University School of Medicine
Emma O’Hagan is a medical librarian at the new Western Michigan University Stryker School of Medicine. The Stryker SOM launched its all-digital library in the summer of 2013 and welcomed its first class of students this past August. Emma assists in the management and development of the library’s rapidly growing collection which provides access to materials through a mix of traditional subscriptions, aggregated content and demand driven... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Twiss-Brooks

Andrea Twiss-Brooks

Director of Research and Teaching Support, University of Chicago



Friday November 7, 2014 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Another Preservation Challenge: Massive Open Online Course (and Online Learning) Materials for Posterity
Slides from Stephanie Orphan
Slides from John Shank
Slides from Heather Staines


Massive, Online, Distance, Self-Directed, Flipped, Blended? Learning models are evolving and changing, and this means new challenges for preservation. With an increasing amount of lecture and course content living in the digital realm, new models for preservation are key. Most courses contain recorded lectures, hosted on YouTube or a MOOC platform like Coursera or edX; required or supplemental readings and resources; user participation forums that may be divided into smaller student-led groups; and other interactions, such as virtual office hours for instructors. Final projects may include student created content. Which of these materials should be preserved? How can such diverse content types be connected to the original course? What copyright issues may be involved?

Bring your questions for two online learning librarians who have been deeply involved in the creation of MOOCs, a preservation specialist from Portico, and a representative from SIPX, the leading provider for licensing content into the MOOC space. What lessons have been learned from early MOOC experiments? What new skills may be needed for this emerging scholarly communication space? What content types are used and how? What are the issues related to MOOC courses licensed by other institutions? As an increasing number of universities and colleges experiment with these new models, the time to ensure a practical preservation plan is during initial phases. This roundtable session will ensure maximum audience participation. Speakers will prepare a few slides outlining their main points, then a moderator will take questions from attendees.

Speakers
SO

Stephanie Orphan

Director of Publisher Relations, Portico
avatar for Ronda Rowe

Ronda Rowe

UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian, University of Texas at Austin
Ronda Rowe is the UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian for the University of Texas Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. In this position, she is responsible for developing and implementing effective and efficient license negotiations and processing for the UT System Digital Library (UTSDL) across all UT System institutions. She also manages the public and internal web pages.
avatar for John Shank

John Shank

Head of the Boscov-Lakin Information Commons & Thun Library, Penn State University
I am the Head of the Boscov-Lakin Information Commons & Thun Library. I was one of the first Instructional Design Librarians in the country and was promoted to the rank of Full Librarian in 2013. I am the founding Director of The Center for Learning & Teaching at Penn State Berks and was selected by Library Journal in 2005 as a Mover and Shaker.
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Publisher and Content Strategy, ProQuest SIPX
I'm passionate about online learning, publisher and library technology, and wearables!


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Authority Control in the Virtual Space
This Lively Lunch session will explore Authority Control in Virtual Libraries. With the implementation of discovery services and electronic resources, is there still a need for the traditional authority control? This session will explore pros and cons.

Speakers
avatar for Corrie Marsh

Corrie Marsh

Scholarly Communications & Collections, Old Dominion University Libraries
Corrie Marsh is the Scholarly Communications & Collections at Old Dominion University Libraries. She earned her B.S. at the University of North Texas and her M.S.L.I.S. at Louisiana State University, where she also worked in serials and collection development. Corrie worked in Acquisitions and Collection Management at Old Dominion University, Georgetown Law Center, Brown University, and George Washington University. Her experience in... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Changing Library Operations
Slides from Allen McKiel
Slides from Jim Dooley

The session is an exploration of library operational adaptations to the changing technologies of information distribution and usage. The librarians will present glimpses of the changes occurring in their library operations as they transition to services without print. A panel of librarians will explore, through the evidence of their changing library operations, a range of topics, for example: trends in e-resource ‘acquisition’ and usage; changes in consortia; processing and organizational changes; and developments in open access publishing and library e-publication. After initial presentations, the panel and moderator will encourage questions, comments, and discussion with attendees.

Speakers
JD

Jim Dooley

Head, Collection Services, University of California, Merced
Jim Dooley has been head of collections and technical services at the University of California, Merced since 2003.  Prior to coming to UC Merced he held a variety of positions in technical services and special collections at the University of Utah.  He serves on various University of California systemwide committees including collections licensing, shared print and cataloging and metadata services.  He has presented at previous... Read More →
avatar for Allen McKiel

Allen McKiel

Dean of Library Services, Western Oregon University
Allen McKiel began his career as a programmer/systems analyst. The merger of his technical skills with librarianship occurred at OCLC and NOTIS. He has over twenty years of academic library experience first as the Director of Libraries for Region 2 of Indiana’s Ivy Tech Community College, then as the Director of Libraries for Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, and currently as Dean of Library Services for Western Oregon University.
avatar for Robert Murdoch

Robert Murdoch

Associate University Librarian for Collection Development & Technical Services, Brigham Young University
CZ

Carol Zsulya

Business & Government Documents Librarian and Collection Development Coordinator, Michael Scwhartz Library, Cleveland State University
Carol is active in the Ohio library community as a member of several of the OhioLINK committees relative to collection management.  At Cleveland State, she is Chair of the University’s Management and Administrative Staff Association.  Carol’s previous work experience has been in marketing, marketing research and financial analysis at several major corporations in the automotive, chemical, and real estate industries.


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Data Mining on Vendor-Digitized Collections
This session delves into the rapidly emerging topic of text and data mining (TDM), from the perspectives of a digital humanist, a librarian, a collection development officer and a product manager for a major vendor of digitized content. We will show concrete examples of TDM on a large vendor-digitized in-copyright collection: the Vogue Archive from ProQuest, with over 400,000 pages of text and images dating from 1892 to the present. Several projects in progress at Yale have illuminated the appeal of TDM applications on Vogue to researchers across disciplines ranging from gender studies to art history to computer science. We will address issues of copyright and licensing, file formats and research platforms, new forms of research enabled by TDM, and how vendors and librarians can work to support digital humanities projects. Session attendees who are new to this topic will learn what TDM is and how they might engage with it in their own work. Audience members who have familiarity with TDM will be encouraged to share their experiences and insights.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Dollar

Daniel Dollar

Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library
Daniel Dollar is the Director of Collection Development for the Yale University Library. As the library’s chief collection development officer, Daniel leads and coordinates collection activities in all formats, and manages the collection development budget. In addition, he represents the Yale University Library as a participating partner with the Research4Life initiative.
avatar for Lindsay King

Lindsay King

Associate Director, Arts Library, Yale University
Lindsay King is the Assistant Director for Access and Research Services in the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library at Yale University. She is responsible for collection development, reference, instruction, and outreach supporting students and faculty in studio art, history of art, architecture, drama, theater studies and dance. Lindsay holds an MS in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois and an MA in Modern Art History... Read More →
avatar for Peg Knight

Peg Knight

Sr. Product Manager for the Arts, ProQuest
Peg Bessette Knight is Senior Product Manager for The Arts at ProQuest. Throughout her career in publishing, educational technology, and the information industry, she has conceptualized and published award-winning reference sources in both print and digital formats on topics as wide-ranging as Native American tribes, modern dance, Shakespeare, and marketing. Behind each project has been a passion for helping the intellectually curious find and... Read More →
avatar for Peter Leonard

Peter Leonard

Director, DHLab, Yale University
Peter Leonard is the Director of the Digital Humanities Lab at Yale University Library, which helps scholars answer humanistic questions with quantitative and algorithmic methods. He previously served as a post-doctoral researcher at UCLA on a Google Digital Humanities Grant to text-mine literature in the Google Books corpus.


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

12:45pm

Discovery on Trial!
How would we judge our collective efforts to ensure discoverability of scholarly works? Aside from the buzz, have library discovery services realized their vision for comprehensive, Google-like search of the library catalog? How do we measure their impact on usage of licensed resources? Where are there still gaps in academic discovery and access services? Should we just give up and leave it all to the mainstream web to sort out (Google, Amazon, Wikipedia)?

Speakers
avatar for Bob Boissy

Bob Boissy

Director, Institutional Marketing and Account Development, Springer Nature
Bob spent the last 10 years in a variety of sales and marketing jobs for Springer, and the 15 years before that working in technical support and data exchange operations for a subscription agent. Bob is former Chair of the International Committee for EDI for Serials, and Past President of NASIG. Current work includes carefully monitoring usage of electronic resources for academic clients in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region, and working on... Read More →
avatar for Christopher C. Brown

Christopher C. Brown

Reference Technology Integration Librarian, University of Denver Libraries
University of Denver, Main Library
avatar for Lettie Conrad

Lettie Conrad

Executive Program Manager, Discovery & Product Analysis, SAGE Publishing
Lettie Conrad came to SAGE in 2006 after managing the publications program for a think tank in Washington, DC. As an Executive Manager in SAGE’s Online Products Team, Lettie leads a group of specialists who expand SAGE’s capacity for digital product development innovations. She is instrumental in launching user-centered web and mobile products, driving research and analysis that enable evidence-based product management to maintain... Read More →
avatar for John McCullough

John McCullough

Product Manager for Discovery Services, OCLC
John McCullough is the product manager for discovery services at OCLC. As such, he is responsible for WorldCat Discovery Services and has led the product team for its launch. He has worked more than 15 years in library automation, with a focus on improving end-user discovery. Formerly Vice President of Product Strategy at Innovative Interfaces, he oversaw the development of the Encore discovery service. He earned his MLIS at the University of... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Empowering Data in Scholarly Publishing
This session will explore the present and future of how data can be enabled and exposed better in scholarly publishing. Speakers will cover implementation of an open data policy, how the community of journals in the Earth and environmental sciences is being engaged to support that policy, how librarians and institutions are being tasked to support open data and how publishers are considering new tools to aid in data discovery.

Speakers
avatar for Gail Clement

Gail Clement

Special Projects Librarian, TAMU, Texas A&M University
ORCID and scholarly identity; Authorship & Contributorship in academic and scholarly publishing; IP rights in student scholarship; copyright education; research data sharing, publication, and citation.
avatar for Catherine Giffi

Catherine Giffi

Director, Strategic Market Analysis, Wiley
avatar for Brooks Hanson

Brooks Hanson

AGU Director of Publications, American Geophysical Union
Brooks Hanson serves as the Director of Publications for the American Geophysical Union (AGU).  He's responsible for overseeing AGU's portfolio of Journals and their operations, helping set overall editorial policies, and leading future developments.  Before arriving at AGU, he served as the Deputy Editor for Physical Sciences at Science and earlier as an editor at Science.  There he was responsible for helping lead the editorial... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Managing Subscriptions After Swets
A panel of librarians, an agents' representative and a publisher discuss how each group is handling the consequences of the Swets bankruptcy and the lessons learned.

Speakers
PC

parry clive

Vice President, Global Marketing, SAGE
avatar for Peter Lawson

Peter Lawson

Chairman, Association of Subscription Agents & Intermediaries
avatar for T. Scott Plutchak

T. Scott Plutchak

Director, Lister Hill Library of Health Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham
T. Scott Plutchak is Director of Digital Data Curation Strategies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).  In that capacity he works with units throughout the university to develop institutional policies and services for the management and curation of research data.  From 1995 to 2014 he was the Director of UAB’s Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.  Prior to that he was Associate Director and then Director... Read More →
WA

Wendy Allen Shelburne

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Managing to the Center: Balancing the Academic Library Seesaw
In many respects, librarians have for some time been living with a foot in two worlds—the past and the present -- while anticipating an ever-changing future. They’ve long pondered the evolution of materials formats, from film strips to videos to DVDs, from hard cover to paperback to microforms, agonizing over cost, space, and usability. More recently they have struggled with how to balance teaching and promotion of their services with the more classic responsibilities of collecting. Daunting tasks, to be sure. In this session, academic-library presenters will focus on the personnel side of the two-worlds conundrum. They will discuss some of the challenges faced by liaison librarians, and their supervisors, who work in an environment which is almost permanently in transition. What skills do liaison librarians need to have to select and develop collections, present them to their user communities, and help those users navigate both the traditional and the emerging information landscape? What can managers do to encourage librarians to develop and maintain an ever- broadening range of skills? How can supervisors anticipate the necessary abilities and perspectives, and ensure their teams have the right mix? How can we "manage to the center,” keeping that seat in the middle of the academic library seesaw – the one that honors the essential past while embracing present changes and future possibilities--from tipping too far in either direction?Attendees will be invited to share their thoughts and comments and engage in dialogue on this topic. Discussion questions will be distributed to the audience as they arrive.

Speakers
HL

Harriet Lightman

Head, Research & Learning Services, Northwestern University Libraries
Harriet Lightman heads Research & Learning Services at Northwestern University Library, and is the library's long-time liaison for history. She was formerly the Head of Academic Liaison Services, and Head of Research & Information Services at Northwestern, and served as a liaison and bibliographer for many subject areas, including economics, philosophy, and French & Italian.
MR

Marianne Ryan

Associate University Librarian, User Strategies, Northwestern University Libraries


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Moving On?: Looking at the Role of Liaison Librarians in Building the Electronic Collection
Many libraries have liaison programs: librarians working with academic units with some level of responsibility for collection development and management. The role of liaisons in collections continues to change. Much of the collection is now determined by external decisions, including state and consortium purchases, ebook and ejournal packages, demand driven acquisitions, and collections of free/open access resources. In some libraries, fund allocations have been eliminated or reduced in amount and importance; adding new continuing resources requires justification, compromise, and a collective decision making process.

Liaisons are challenged to find new ways to work with department faculty on collection questions and to bring department input into library collection decision making processes. Liaisons may need help gathering information to provide lists of library resources in a subject area or details about pricing, licensing, and content of resources required for new programs. Liaisons must educate faculty about different collection models, and explain package restrictions that limit canceling and adding subscriptions. Unforeseen price increases, journal transfers, and removal from aggregator databases or state-wide collections may suddenly make a key resource unavailable and complicate the relationship between librarian and department faculty. Liaisons also work with faculty on bound journal and monograph weeding projects.

Ferris State University Library is working on two related projects: an updated definition of our liaison program and a comprehensive collection management plan. These projects highlight the changing role of library liaisons within collections and the variety of responses to these changes. We want to share and learn more with other librarians. In our session we will collectively decide which changes to talk about. We will call on others to share experiences and ideas. We will gain a better understanding of the current role of liaison librarians in collection development and management, and ideas about how to respond to future changes.

Speakers
avatar for Leah Monger

Leah Monger

Head, Digital and Support Services, Ferris State University Library FLITE
Leah Monger is currently the Head of Digital and Support Services at Ferris State University where she has worked since 1997. She served as acting dean from 2009-2012. She previously held positions as Head of Cataloging at Trinity College in Hartford, CT and Technical Services Librarian at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh.
avatar for Frances Rosen

Frances Rosen

Collection Development and Acquisitions Librarian, Ferris State University Library FLITE
I'm interested in collections and acquisitions, information literacy for engineering and technology students, competency-based general education, inclusion & diversity, MOOCs, and baseball. (Wait til next year!)


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

12:45pm

Running a Collaborative Shared Print Project in Earnest
Real estate in the library is a sought-after commodity. To find space for collaborative learning, academic libraries are actively “weeding” the print collection, either sending volumes to storage or even discarding them. Often, these efforts are done as cooperative “shared print” projects. Earlier efforts at such initiatives required extensive manual work to audit various sources and have taken enormous amounts of staff time. Because of this, many efforts for monographic de-accessioning have actually stalled at the philosophical discussion level. Today, there are new technologies that can make these types of exercises not only bearable but less-labor intensive and more successful. This Lively Lunch panel discussion will describe the state-of-the-art approaches and best practices for weeding collections. Rick Burke, the executive director of SCELC, will provide brief background on the shared print project that the SCELC libraries have undertaken and introduce our three speakers. Attendees will also hear from Lizanne Payne, noted expert in shared print projects and consultant to Project WEST, who will discuss best practices, observed outcomes, the motivations of the participating libraries and how a large consortium views the “cohorts” within the project. Jane Burke, Senior Vice President for Strategic Initiatives at ProQuest, will describe how Intota Assessment assists in de-selection for both print and ebook management. Mike Garabedian, Collections Management Librarian at Whittier College, will discuss a new aspect of shared print planning, describing a condition assessment survey he undertook to identify copies of mutually held titles with the greatest artifactual value. 

Speakers
avatar for Jane Burke

Jane Burke

Vice President, ProQuest
Jane Burke, Vice President Strategic Initiatives, is one of the executive sponsors of Intota™, Serials Solutions web-scale management solution. In this role, she is providing strategic leadership and working closely with the development partners to deliver a world class library collection management solution. Her expertise in development of compelling new solutions, go to market strategies and global expansion are just a few of the... Read More →
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
MG

Mike Garabedian

Collections Management Librarian, Wardman Library, Whittier College
LP

Lizanne Payne

Consultant


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Soggy Situations: Recovering Wet Materials
The Howard-Tilton Memorial Library (HTML) at Tulane University, despite our best efforts, continues to suffer from minor disasters (Hurricane Isaac flooding/2012 and FEMA Katrina build-back construction flooding/2014). Many valuable lessons have been learned along the way, most notably after a major disaster, Hurricane Katrina in 2005. HTML, having suffered through many recovery efforts, offered assistance to libraries affected by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The most recent HTML disaster where collections were damaged and loss occurred was in February, 2014, when flooding occurred on the 4th floor of the library. Immediate response included moving books out of harm’s way. Recovery included re-shelving some 15,000 undamaged books, remediation of 2,200 damaged books, and replacement of 300 unsalvageable titles. We will share photos and discuss what happened, look at collection efforts to get a handle on what was affected and the impact on students, and technical processing (both in-house and outsourced) throughout the entire episode. This discussion will focus on what libraries can learn from one another about different levels of recovery efforts, including guidance from our experience and from national standards-making bodies about how libraries can share expertise internally, across divisions and classifications, to optimize the response to future incidents. Handouts will be provided with information from HTML’s most recent recovery efforts (see http://tults.pbworks.com/w/page/76901795/Recovery_and_Remediation_2014). Attendees will leave with a sense of how recovery and remediation works.

Speakers
SK

Sally Krash

Head of Acquisitions, Tulane University
avatar for Joshua Lupkin

Joshua Lupkin

Chief Bibliographer for the Humanities, Tulane University
With a background in history academia and museums, Josh Lupkin brings a strong interest in interest in the way that technology does and does not influence humanities' scholars use of scholarly resources. He is especially interested in the evolution of ebook platforms how to balance publisher, library, and end user needs in this area. He is also researching the impact of digital concsciousness on vibrant areas of alternative print culture... Read More →
EW

Eric Wedig

Chief Bibliographer for the Social Sciences, Tulane University


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

The Big Squeeze: State of Book Publishing and Academic Libraries

In 2014, the University of Michigan Business School Library (Kresge Business Administration Library) emptied its shelves of books in a project that will forever change library support for the school’s research needs.  No longer will the library be format agnostic in acquiring resources; only online resources will be purchased.  How did this happen and what does it mean for the future of the library?  More importantly, what may this suggest for other libraries?  What does this mean for the future of publishers and vendors?  If the library is not going to buy any print books, then the rationale of current models is seriously challenged if not entirely inadequate.

Publishers and libraries operate under fiscal and physical conditions that drive them further and further from mutually beneficial arrangements towards ones which are not sustainable nor good for either side.  Gone are the days when we thought first and foremost about a quality item that would stand the test of time on our shelves.  Instead, we are interested only in our immediate value and extracting value from others in the Information Supply Chain (or circle as many would argue).  

With these changes on nearly every participant in the scholarly communication space, it is very clear that we are all being squeezed in a tight spot.  This session will seek to identify and potentially find a common path where we can build a future that works for everyone.  Leading the discussion will be a library director dealing with severe restrictions, a Sales Director from an academic publisher (also specializing in Business), and a representative from a major academic library book distributor  Each party will provide a view from their desk that showcases a way that we might find some much needed breathing room in an increasingly small space.  We hope you’ll join us for what we’re sure will be a very lively discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Beth Barilla

Mary Beth Barilla

Sales Manager, Emerald Group Publishing, Inc.
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan, Ross School of Business
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction project in 2016. Corey has been director since October 2006 and previously worked as the Associate Dean for Resource and Systems Management at the... Read More →
avatar for Michael  Zeoli

Michael Zeoli

VP, eContent Development, YBP Library Services
YBP Library Services, 1997-current | ebrary, 2005-2007 | Regenstein Library, Acquisitions Dept., University of Chicago | http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/virtual_conferences/eternal_ebooks/


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

The Implications of Online Media on Academic Library Collections
Libraries’ market share of discovery has been declining rapidly, and in some cases this is directly related to where the content users need and want resides. Music recording delivery models have changed dramatically in the last several years, with more performers and labels offering content directly to consumers via downloads only. Unfortunately, this model is one in which libraries cannot usually legally participate due to licensing agreements (aside from services like Freegal and Hoopla, which don’t meet academic libraries’ needs). Another issue at play is the growing presence of quality content on sites like YouTube, which users are already very familiar and comfortable with. In light of this, user behavior has been evolving to incorporate more and more non-library sources of music discovery and acquisition. Patrons no longer see the library as the sole source for music content (if they ever did). This is due in part to the convenience of online sources and the fact that, while libraries may still need to buy CDs, users would rather have recordings they can listen to anywhere/anytime. So how can academic libraries earnestly address these challenges to continue to meet our mission of building collections and serving our patrons?

The objective of this session is to inform a larger audience beyond music librarians of the issues we all face in building our media collections and in serving our users today. To that end, attendees can expect to learn about: current music delivery models, issues involved in acquiring and delivering online media (primarily audio), information seeking behaviors of music faculty and students (based on my previous studies, including one about faculty attitudes toward YouTube, recently published in CRL), and offer some suggestions for librarians to address the issues. Attendees will be asked to offer their thoughts and possible approaches for moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Kirstin Dougan

Kirstin Dougan

Music and Performing Arts Librarian, University of Illinois
Kirstin Dougan is Music and Performing Arts Librarian and Associate Professor, University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she has worked since 2007. Prior to that she was first a Digital Projects Librarian with the University of Wisconsin-Madison General Library System and then Interim Head and Public Services Librarian at the Duke University Music Library. She has taught Music Librarianship and Bibliography for... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

The Promise and Perils of 'Alternative Metrics': What Librarians Need to Know about the #Altmetrics Landscape
Every couple of years a new trendy topic comes to the fore, and of late it's been all things #altmetrics​. But what are alternative metrics really and what do librarians need to know about them? The landscape of bibliometrics is in great flux as traditional metrics of scholarly impact (i.e. H-index, citations, and impact factor) meet new web-native metrics of social/societal impact. Researchers and those who support them -- libraries, grant administrators, and scholarly communications offices -- need to be aware of these metrics to understand what such metrics can tell an researcher or institution about their reach, who is engaging with their research, and what they're saying about that research.

Join PLOS, NISO, and librarians from American University and Harvard University on a panel moderated by Altmetric.com for an overview of the landscape, challenges/opportunities libraries should consider, and efforts on establish standards and best practices. This will be moderated discussion between the panel and the audience. Each panelist will be give 5 minutes to briefly introduce themselves and work in the space. We'll then open the floor to questions and debate on various topics. The moderator will solicit questions in advance via twitter.

Moderators
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Product Sales Manager, The Americas, Altmetric.com
Sara Rouhi has worked in scholarly publishing for seven years and manages sales and outreach in North America for Altmetric.com. She speaks and runs workshops on metrics in practice and the scholarly publishing process at library and scholarly publishing conferences worldwide. | | She is an active member of the Society of Scholarly Publishing's Education Committee and currently runs their Librarian Focus Group program. She was awarded... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Borchardt

Rachel Borchardt

Science Librarian, American University
Rachel Borchardt is the science librarian at American University. Her professional research focuses on the intersection of metrics and libraries, and she has written and presented on the topic in many venues, including a recent book publication titled Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-Century Librarian's Guide to Bibliometrics, Altmetrics and Research Impact, published by the American Library Association and available from the ALA Store and Amazon... Read More →
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Product Director, PLOS
John Chodacki is Product Director for Public Library of Science. In his role, he oversees the tools and services that support PLOS' publishing program as well as PLOS’ Article Level Metrics initiative and Data program. John has spent most of his career leading digital publishing initiatives. Before joining PLOS, he managed the product management team at VIZ Media. Prior to that, he managed cross-functional digital publishing teams at... Read More →
avatar for Scott Lapinski

Scott Lapinski

Scholarly Communication & Research Librarian, Harvard Medical School


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

The Ten Commandments of a Good Collection
What is a “good” library collection? Received wisdom tells us a good collection is one that meets the needs of the institution. But what are the characteristics that coalesce to create such collections? Our search to define the good collection in conceptual terms arose from a practical collection assessment project, with the pragmatic goal of liberating shelf space in a liberal arts college library. Our deliberations were informed by a critical review of the literature on collection development and insights gained from hands-on involvement in planning and managing the assessment project. The result was a set of ten qualities which we argue define the “good collection”, and which we have provocatively labeled as our “Ten Commandments.” We take our inspiration here from Harry Faulkner-Brown, a British architect who designed many notable library buildings around the world and in the process formulated a set of desirable qualities that became known as the “ten commandments” of library space planning, which were later revisited and updated by UK library director Andrew McDonald (2006). Like McDonald, we do not intend the qualities that we have defined to be seen as prescriptive instructions, but offer them rather as thought-starters about guiding principles for library colleagues tasked with building, managing, and developing collections. Our criteria were developed for a circulating collection in an undergraduate library, but are arguably transferable to other library settings. Our objective for this session is to share our ideas with colleagues and obtain their feedback to refine our model. We shall first present our ten qualities and the rationale for each criterion, and then invite reactions to our criteria, including comments on the qualities that participants rate as the most important, and other qualities that they would include or substitute. Attendees will learn about current thinking and practice in evaluating library collections.

Reference
McDonald, A. (2006). The ten commandments revisited: The qualities of good library space. LIBER Quarterly, 16(2).

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004, she became Professor of Library & Information Management at the University of Sheffield, then head of the Sheffield iSchool, before moving to the US in 2012 to lead... Read More →
DW

Denise Weldon-Siviy

Student, University of Pittsburgh


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

What You Need To Know About Moving Collections and Acquisitions Into An E-Dominant Model!
Two different University of Maryland Libraries will discuss how they have moved to an e-dominant model, the reasons why, and the new acquisitions strategies libraries can use in crafting an e-dominant collection. Whether you are from a large ARL library like University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) or a non-traditional online university like University of Maryland University College (UMUC), participants can expect to learn a myriad of strategies for taking advantage of the new acquisitions environment and rethinking how to build collections in an e-dominant world. At UMD College Park, adopting an e-dominant model has been a gradual change over time, allowing the library staff to develop new ideas about collection development and experiment with new tools and techniques for acquiring and managing the libraries’ collection. As these changes have unfolded over time, staff began to develop a more comprehensive and holistic picture, becoming more aware of how their own work with e-resources impacts our colleagues, our patrons, and the wider library community. At the UMUC Library, the electronic resources management staff developed an e-model initiative that represents a fundamental shift for electronic resources management at UMUC. Electronic resources have become a critical, important, and fully integrated component in course development for the university and this is driving the direction of collection development for the Library. The main thrust of this shift has been the establishment of an E-Resources Initiative to replace the use of textbooks in print with e-resources, primarily open access, embedded within the learning management system (LMS) course modules. Attendees will have the chance to share their own experiences, and presenters will encourage audience members to identify strategies and/or challenges that might be new to all of us.

Speakers
avatar for Lenore England

Lenore England

Assistant Director, Electronic Resources Management, University of Maryland University College
Lenore England is Assistant Director for Electronic Resources Management (ERM) at the University of Maryland University College. She has co-chaired several University of System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions (USMAI) ERM task groups and committees and does fundraising for ALCTS and ALA. She received the 2012 Coutts Award for Innovation in ERM.
GF

Geraldine Foudy

Manager of Collections, University of Maryland, College Park
Gerri Foudy is Manager of Collections at the University of Maryland at College Park Libraries.  In this position she oversees the Libraries' collection budget, approval plans, and vendor negotiations as well as working with a team on a major collection realignment project.  Prior to this positon, she served as the Head of the Social Sciences Team and was the subject librarian liaison for Government and Politics, Public Policy, and Law... Read More →
avatar for (Lila) Angie Ohler

(Lila) Angie Ohler

Head of Acquisitions, University of Maryland, College Park
(Lila) Angie Ohler is Head of Acquisitions for the University of Maryland Libraries at College Park. She is responsible for the licensing, acquisition, and management of all library resources, including books and journals in both electronic and print formats. A professional librarian for the last 11 years, her career coincides with the rise of electronic resources in academic libraries, and her publications focus on how libraries have managed... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

A Fund Allocation Process: Employing a Use Factor
Beginning in 2012, two librarians sought to revise the beastly allocation formula used to distribute monographic funds at East Carolina University. After investigating different methods, they decided to develop a formula that employs a use factor based on circulation statistics to distribute funds more equitably. This presentation will go over basic elements in fund allocation formulas and present specific information on the fund formula newly adopted at ECU. It will include the process being used to gather the statistics the formula relies upon, and will delineate what we’ve learned from the first year of using the formula. Special attention will be paid to our incorporation of firm order ebook data in year two. Audience engagement will come from active queries about their libraries’ use of allocation formulas, the elements they employ in their formulas and questions regarding the formula ECU is now in their second year of using.

Speakers
LB

Lisa Barricella

Head of Monographic Acquisitions, East Carolina University
Lisa Barricella is the Head of Monographic Acquisitions and Preservation/Conservation at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Lisa earned her MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh, has worked in libraries since 2000 and joined ECU in 2003.
CS

Cindy Shirkey

Head of Collection Development, East Carolina University
Cindy Shirkey is the Collection Development Librarian for the Humanities at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.  She received her M.A. in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her M.S.L.I.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

2:15pm

Adding e-Preferred Approvals & DDA to the Mix
This session will explore how the Library worked with book vendors, a bibliographic utility, and their ILS to acquire monographs in print and electronic formats. Applying in-house expertise to various monographic acquisitions models has resulted in the library providing desired content in the preferred format efficiently and at reasonable cost.

The discussion will center on our use of a primary vendor, YBP, to drive purchases via multiple acquisitions models, each handled through a unique workflow that is specifically designed to provide access to the content in an efficient and cost effective manner. YBP supplies both traditional print resources as well as ebooks on a variety of platforms. The library has established subject-based profiles that result in electronic book notifications for firm orders, print approval deliveries, e-preferred approvals, and patron driven ebooks. These workflows allow for the lion's share, but not all, of the purchases to go through the primary vendor. Staff are empowered to shift order requests between acquisitions models (e.g. from e-preferred to patron-driven) or to a secondary vendor when specific criteria are met. For the most part such changes are seamless to subject liaisons and the patrons.

Bibliographic records are downloaded from a variety of vendor sources. Sources include, OCLC WorldCat Partners, Serials Solutions, YBP, Baker & Taylor. Each vendor offers a set of technical specifications for generating data files for output. Records are uploaded to the ILS through customized load tables that further refine or modify the imported record. A load table is constructed to support multiple vendor profiles and multiple campus accounting units. The intent is to minimize the need for individual record editing after uploading a data file. Additionally, RDA conversion is included as part of the record load for Serials Solutions records, and is outsourced for OCLC WorldCat Partners downloads.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Guajardo

Richard Guajardo

Head of Resource Discovery Systems, University of Houston
Richard provides oversight for electronic resources management, resource discovery tools, and the library services platform. He is currently webmaster for ALCTS's Committee on Cataloging: Description & Access (CC:DA), and is past-chair of ALCTS's Collection Management & Electronic Resources Interest Group. He previously was chair of ALA's GODORT Cataloging Committee and the ALCTS Cataloging Form and Function Interest Group. | Richard earned his... Read More →
avatar for J. Michael Thompson

J. Michael Thompson

Head of Acquisitions, University of Houston
After graduating with an MLS from the University of Texas, J. Michael (Mike) Thompson began his professional career as the Copy Cataloging Manager at the University of Houston in 2000. In 2005, he moved from Cataloging to Acquistions at UH and was appointed to head the department in September 2006. Mike has presented at the national and local levels throughout his career. He has served on numerous state and national committees, interest... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Bridgeview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Adios to Paper Journals – Removed and Recycled – One Mile Long and 75 Tons
This presentation will use Appalachian State’s experiences as a stimulus for discussion about how we have, and others may, successfully remove, in a single swoop, thousands of linear feet of little-used collections to open library areas for new services and spaces. The program will be a resource and guide to others interested in large-scale deaccessioning projects.

Space constraints limit many midsize and small academic libraries wishing to implement new services. The largest occupant of library square footage is the paper collection and this collection is declining in use. With the rise of ejournals and extensive digital archives, the most dramatic fall off in use has occurred in the bound journal stacks. How can large swaths of space be confidently reclaimed by identifying and disposing of bound journals now held in online archives? What will the campus reaction be and how can it be managed? What is involved in project planning and implementation? What staffing and subscription savings were realized? What content was saved?

In 2014 alone, Appalachian has removed more than one mile and 75 tons of the journal collection. We will offer insights into a successful project and engage the audience in a discussion about emerging best practices for detecting the driving forces for journal removal; project planning; public relations; campus reactions; technical services issues; logistical concerns; and materials disposal.

Speakers
avatar for John P. Abbott

John P. Abbott

Coordinator, Collection Management, Appalachian State University
John Abbott is Coordinator of Collection Management @ Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.  He previously served as North Carolina State University’s Associate Head of Collection Management with responsibilities for life sciences/agriculture, and as Texas A&M University’s Agriculture Librarian.  Before librarianship, he was a field biologist mapping vegetation in Utah and New Mexico and live-trapping deer and elk: all good... Read More →
MJ

Mary Jordan

Collection Management Technician, Appalachian State University


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Covering Down Under: Books from Australia and New Zealand: What North American Librarians Should Know
Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) comprise a major English language book publishing region. But to North American librarians, ANZ frequently seems disconnected from the book trade they know, as if these books came from the other end of the world. Which, of course, they do. But geography is only one of the reasons these books can be difficult for librarians in North America to cover. In this program, three librarians and vendors who know the Australian book trade will address the many questions North American librarians often raise about ANZ books. How many books of academic interest are published in Australia and New Zealand? How much do they cost? When must they be ordered in Australia? How many are co-published in North America or the UK? How long does it take to get them? How can librarians find about them? Which subject areas are the strongest? How many ebooks are available?
In a globalized world, academic librarians need to know all they can about pertinent books, no matter where they are published—since their patrons do. This program will provide basic information about book publishing in Australia and New Zealand, with a focus on collection development and acquisitions work in North American academic libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Faye Christenberry

Faye Christenberry

English Studies Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
Faye Christenberry is English Studies Librarian at the University of Washington Libraries. She is co-author of Literary Research and the Literatures of Australia and New Zealand: Strategies and Sources (Scarecrow). Faye’s personal and professional interests converge on our topic and she will speak as both a reader and an academic library selector for Australian and New Zealand literature. Faye has an MLIS from the University of Illinois... Read More →
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President, Product Development, Ingram Library Services
Bob Nardini is Vice President, Product Development at Ingram Coutts.  He worked in both public and academic libraries prior to 1985, when he took a job in the academic bookselling industry, where he has been ever since.  In 2007 Nardini joined Coutts and since then has been involved in several areas of the company’s activity, including the development of the OASIS® and ipage® customer sites,  the MyiLibrary®... Read More →
avatar for Jean Ward

Jean Ward

Selector-Bibliographer, Ingram Content Group
Jean Ward is a Selector-Bibliographer at Ingram Coutts. Over the past two years Jean has selected thousands of new titles from hundreds of Australian and New Zealand publishers, in all subject areas, for academic libraries in Australia and in North America. Jean holds an MLIS from the University of Alabama. She is a published children's author and is based in La Vergne, Tennessee.


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Evidence Based Collection Models: Not Your Traditional DDA
More libraries are moving to new online book purchase models to ensure they are getting what they need for their patrons within their allotted budget. Evidenced based collection management is not a new term in collections development but new approaches are being developed that gives the library back the control to purchase based on their patron activity. This session will look at a new approach that gives librarians more flexibility over building their digital library. Wiley's usage based collection management model allows libraries to present a large set of titles to their patrons and make a purchase selection based on evidence of demand. There are no automatic triggers for purchasing so the librarian still has the purchasing control.

Attendees will hear from a panel of librarians who are using this usage based collection management model. Wiley moderator, Lisa Nachtigall, will facilitate the panel discussion from the librarians. Attendees can expect to learn best practices for implementing a program like this, promoting and socializing to patrons, and key learnings and challenges. In addition to the panel presenting their own experiences, there will be additional time for questions and discussion from the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Galadriel Chilton

Galadriel Chilton

Head of Licensing & Acquisitions, University of Connecticut
University of Connecticut
avatar for Monica Metz-Wiseman

Monica Metz-Wiseman

Acting Director, Academic Resources, Univ of South Florida Library
avatar for Robert Murdoch

Robert Murdoch

Associate University Librarian for Collection Development & Technical Services, Brigham Young University
avatar for Lisa Nachtigall

Lisa Nachtigall

Director, Sales Development, Wiley
I joined Wiley in 2010 and am currently Director of Sales Development, Digital Books. In this global role, I am responsible for the strategies and partnerships which drive digital book sales. My primary focus is on library channels. In addition to the development of sales and pricing models for Wiley Online Library, I also set Wiley’s strategies for delivering content via ebook aggregators. Prior to joining Wiley I led Oxford University... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

From Collection Development to Content Development: Organization and Staffing for the 21st Century
The University of Kansas (KU) Libraries’ reorganization, which occurred just over a year ago, began the newly created Content Development Department. Unlike the bibliographer model of the past, the new structure greatly reduced the number of librarians dedicated to the stewardship of the Libraries’ collections. The new department’s stability would be short term. With the impending retirement of three long standing and knowledgeable librarians, who made up half of the new department, a review of the responsibilities of the Content Development Department and identification of the human resources needed to meet the collection demands of a user-centered library became a high priority. In an effort to determine how the Libraries could proceed, an environmental scan of current collection development activities was completed. Through the literature and contacts with academic librarian colleagues, KU librarians identified how collecting practices and formats might develop in the future. Based on evidence gained through a survey of faculty and graduate students at KU, the librarians discovered that there is a strong sentiment, among their constituents, that library resources need to be carefully managed to support the teaching and research needs of the university. By clearly identifying their collection development responsibilities (it’s not just buying books!), KU librarians are successfully transitioning into the new organizational structure with the staffing needed to make knowledgeable collection development decisions. In this session, KU librarians will discuss their efforts and findings to make a case to continue to support deep subject expertise for collection development, particularly in the arts and humanities. In a time of budgetary woes and a shift in priorities in higher education, it has become imperative that academic libraries are prepared to make a strong case to support their collection development activities.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Currie

Lea Currie

Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries
Lea Currie has been the head of Content Development at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008 and employed with the Libraries in other positions since 1999. Lea’s principal role in her current position is to manage the collection development budget, review and analyze collections, and coordinate collection development projects.
avatar for Sara E. Morris

Sara E. Morris

Associate Content Development Librarian, University of Kansas
Sara E. Morris is the Associate Content Development Librarian at the University of Kansas Libraries, a position she has held since May of 2013. As such Sara works in partnership with the Head of Content Development to review and analyze the collection, makes selection and deselection decisions, and provide sarcastic comments during otherwise dull meetings. Prior to this position she served as KU’s American History Librarian for five years.


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Humanities E-Book Usage on a Global Scale
Building on a white paper that will be released in fall 2014, this session will delve deeper into usage data for hundreds of thousands of e-books from ebrary and EBL at institutions worldwide, taking a closer look at the arts and humanities titles in the pool. Long-form scholarship is vital to the humanities, and the value that scholars, students, and librarians in these disciplines place on the monograph has made the transition to e-books more difficult than in the social sciences and STEM disciplines. This vast set of data allows us to examine how humanists at a wide range of libraries have made use of e-books and helps us answer questions about how this transition has impacted the reading habits of these heavy book users. This session will use multiple measures to compare usage in the humanities to other disciplines and will then examine usage more closely in the subject areas that make up the arts and humanities. Attendees will get a picture of humanities e-book usage on a macro level and will get tips on how to use similar methodology to analyze their local collections and compare usage to general patterns. By doing so, librarians can build better collections and better serve their users.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
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Kari Paulson

VP and General Manager, EBooks, ProQuest


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Journals Without Borders: The Next Emerging Academic Markets
With traditional higher education markets surpassing their peak in domestic student enrollment, library budgets and demand for research content, the industry continues to look to the developing world for growth. While the BRIC markets have dominated much of the media focus on emerging nations in recent years, for academia at least three of these—Brazil, India and China—are certainly important but they are not the end of the story. Recent data on the global origins of new scholarly publications, sources of institutions and users accessing content, and sites for overseas campuses of Western universities, yield some interesting new insights for publishers, vendors and librarians.

Bringing together a panel featuring a publisher expanding into new markets, a librarian with an international campus and a scholarly platform provider, this panel will explore the latest hot markets for the higher education and research communities and how to serve these diverse constituencies around the world. Based on data from institutional registrations and new content on the ingentaconnect research portal of 10,000 publications from 250 publishers worldwide, the session will reveal the geographic breakdown and recent trends of libraries accessing the service, site traffic and sources of new content. We will discuss what this means for publishers looking to break into these regions and describe some specific sales and marketing journeys abroad. Finally, we will overlay the library perspective on how to manage information resources across institutions with increasingly global reach and international branch campuses.

The panel will address such questions as: where are the fastest growing sources of traffic to digital content? What are publishers doing to identify opportunities and break into new regions? And what does it take to serve a globalized library? Attendees can expect to hear real data, test their assumptions about the world economy and delve into new adventures in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East.

Moderators
avatar for Melissanne Scheld

Melissanne Scheld

Managing Director, Publishers Communication Group

Speakers
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Vida Damijonaitis

American Medical Association, Manager, Worldwide Sales
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Teddy Gray

Head of Acquisitions, Duke University Libraries
avatar for Toby Plewak

Toby Plewak

Product Manager, Publishing Technology


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

No Crystal Ball: Planning for Certain Future Cuts when the Future is Uncertain
Slides from University of Nevada, Reno
Slides from UNC Greensboro


Many academic libraries have to make decisions about journal and database subscriptions before the university releases the upcoming budget. Often, it is necessary to not only make decisions for the following fiscal year without a final budget, but to plan ahead and forecast for an additional year. This presentation will discuss how two academic libraries plan for future cuts even with an uncertain future.

The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Libraries approached it with a comprehensive collection review, covering print and electronic journals, journal packages, and databases. A wide range of data from various sources were brought together using Excel and Access. General assessment criteria were established. Communication, review, and the decision making process involving liaison librarians and faculty were managed with a combination of an online guide, SharePoint, Excel spreadsheets, and workshops. In addition, the e-book Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA) program was refined and the impact of cancelled journals on interlibrary loan was assessed. The goal was to correctly eliminate the journals with low demand and to allow smart purchases of high-demand resources for the future.

The Library at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) formed a Collection Development Team with members from several invested departments who could divide into subgroups, analyze data, and return quickly with proposed cuts. Different scenarios were identified, and a proposed plan for cuts was created for each potential scenario. This data-driven process provided CPU, circulation, and other data to assist the team in making decisions. Timelines were created to allow for ample input from liaisons and departments, including time for departments to react to the proposed cuts in their areas and to swap out items. To make better monograph purchasing decisions, the Library is moving to DDA for approval plan books, where three uses will trigger an order. To manage user needs to journal titles being cancelled, the Library is investigating use of Pay-Per-View options to allow “rental” of cancelled titles.

The presenters will address the methods used to plan and forecast for cuts in an uncertain future, as well as present challenges to these methods and future efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collections and Scholarly Communications, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Libraries
Beth Bernhardt is the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  She has her graduate degree in Library Science from the University of South Carolina.  Beth has over twenty years of experience working in academic libraries, fourteen of those years specializing in electronic resources. She serves on the Carolina Consortium team that works with... Read More →
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Karen Grigg

Science Liaison Librarian, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Libraries
GS

Gail Stanton

Continuations Supervisor, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries
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Paoshan Yue

Head, E-Resources & Acquisitions, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries
Paoshan Yue is the Head of Electronic Resources & Acquisitions Services at the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries.


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Patron Driven Acquisition: What Do We Know of our Patrons?
The goose that lays the golden eggs in a Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) library world, is knowledge on patrons’ use of e-books. In a largely digital information environment, it’s increasingly possible for the library to pay only for what its patrons find and actually use. However, in order to make large numbers of e-books accessible while keeping the costs down, you should know who the users are and what books they prefer. Thanks to a large-scale PDA pilot Utrecht University Library has a unique dataset with detailed information on the use of e-books by students and scientists from all scientific disciplines. What can we learn from this dataset for setting up a PDA-model?

A key feature of the PDA pilots at Utrecht University Library is that users are not aware (do not know) what e-books are owned by the library and what books are not (yet). Both categories are accessible via the library catalogue. Initially, the pilot was limited to a few scientific disciplines, but since August 2013 our PDA pilot consists of almost 40,000 e-books from all disciplines. If these non-owned e-books pass a certain number of so-called Short Term Loans they are automatically purchased. However, before users are able to borrow these “PDA-books” they have to fill in a small form in which they give some background information about themselves. This information – obviously anonymous – provides the library with invaluable information on user behavior and preferences.

Monique Teubner will reflect in her presentation on the main questions librarians are dealing with while setting up PDA-models. What are the preferences of users from different scientific backgrounds and from different academic levels? What are the price differences between various PDA-models? And, how does knowledge make PDA models more sustainable?

Speakers
avatar for Monique Teubner

Monique Teubner

project manager, Utrecht University Library
I am project manager at the Utrecht University Library en currently doing pilots with PDA.


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29205

2:15pm

Scholarly eBooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Longitudinal Assessment of Project Muse/UPCC eBooks at Emory, Harvard, and Yale
Project Muse/UPCC eBooks is currently one of the major distribution channels for humanities and social sciences e-book content. Partnering with approximately 100 academic publishers, the Project Muse eBook initiative makes available over 25,000 recent year (and copyright protected) academic press titles, covering subjects across the humanities, social sciences, and Area Studies. These titles are made available on the familiar Project Muse journal platform: content is cross-searchable, downloadable in PDF format (without DRM restrictions), and archived in Portico. There has long been debate and speculation of user preferences in terms of print versus electronic formats. This panel will discuss assessment projects in place for analyzing these questions at three major ARL libraries which have acquired Project Muse/UPCC e-book content while simultaneously keeping in place their acquisition of identical print content. By acquiring Project Muse/UPCC e-books while simultaneously maintaining their print acquisitions for identical titles, these libraries have acquired rich data with which to ask and answer a number of important and vexing questions of longstanding. For instance, how do our patrons respond when given a choice between accessing the same titles in print versus a widely accepted digital format? Are there certain fields/disciplines, call number ranges, or other sets of users that lean one way or another? Speculation abounds as to scholar preferences for print versus digital content, especially in the humanities and social sciences, and this panel will present plans and initial findings for studying the question empirically. This focus on data assessment and empirical study of user preferences aligns nicely with this year’s theme “The Importance of Being Earnest.”

Speakers
avatar for Celeste Feather

Celeste Feather

Senior Director, Licensing & Partnerships, LYRASIS
avatar for Katherine Leach, MLIS, MA

Katherine Leach, MLIS, MA

Librarian for Western Languages Collections, Harvard University
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Chris Palazzolo

Head of Collection Management and Social Sciences Librarian, Emory University Libraries
avatar for Sarah Tudesco

Sarah Tudesco

Assessment Librarian, Yale University Library


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Shotgun Session
Slides from Stacey Marien
Slides from Corey Seeman


These short "pecha kucha-like" sessions will feature 4 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have approximately 15 minutes at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all 4 sessions. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Performance Appraisal in Collection Development
Steve Alleman, Head of Collections, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Annual personnel evaluations are always difficult, but they are especially problematical in collection development, because the librarians doing the basic work of selection and liaising with faculty and students often do not report to the librarian responsible for collection development and assessment. In this session we will discuss bridging the gap between public and technical services, explore the ways that different organizational structures will affect the performance appraisal process, and also examine a set of competencies that can be used in that process irrespective of individual variables. Attendees will have the opportunity to share appraisal strategies used at their libraries and to propose new approaches to the problem.

2) Using Libguides to Corral Your Workflows
Stacey Marien, Acquisitions Librarian, American University

Starting up the E-preferred approval plan was the last straw. What kind of ebook was this? What account code did we use? Did we have to set up a profile with OCLC? Who would load the records? What would the email say from Coutts Ingrams? Is my head attached to my body?

Ebooks are primarily handled by the Acquisitions Department in the library of American University. We realized that we had too many ebook programs going on to keep straight (never mind all the print book programs too such as the newly launched purchase-on-demand service). There had to be a way to document these workflows and make them available in an easily accessible manner to everyone in Acquisitions and beyond. The reference librarians have created many libguides to help users, why not create a libguide to help the internal users in Technical Services as well as other areas of the library? The Ebook confusion was just the start and as the LibGuide took shape, we brainstormed all the other workflows that could be included. The end result was the following: rethinking each workflow; consulting with several departments in the library, including outside technical services; and revising existing documentation as well as creating new workflows for existing procedures. Our ultimate goal was to make sure we had all the workflow documentation we needed and to make it easy for everyone in the library to find that information.

3) Here we go again!: Reorganization for the change weary
Annette Day, Director, Logistics and Resource Distribution Services Distribution, University of Nevada-Las Vegas

This shotgun session will provide a brief overview of the planning needed to enact a successful reorganization of a technical services department using the experience of the reorganization of the Logistics and Resource Distribution Services (LRDS) Division at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas(UNLV) Libraries.

LRDS is a large division with diverse functions including collection management, acquisitions, discovery, ILL, stacks management and digital scholarship. This session will describe the steps undertaken at UNLV and will provide attendees with guidance on planning, information gathering and communication needs when undertaking a review of department/division workflows, roles and structure. The session will also emphasize pitfalls to avoid based on the experiences of staff in the UNLV LRDS Division who have experienced continual change in structure, roles and personnel over the past several years.

4) The Ethereal Library: Thinking Creatively When You Have No Space To Think
Corey Seeman, Kresge Library Services Director, University of Michigan

Today’s library operates in two distinct spaces. First, there is the physical space, where we provide our community a place to work, where we provide access to print materials, and where we can provide a place to provide service. Second, there is the ethereal space, where we connect with users, provide outreach, and where our value is revealed. And in the best case scenario, a library has these two spaces to operate from. However, over the past few years, many academic libraries (especially departmental ones) have seen their footprint erode.

Despite being well regarded as a service unit and essential for student study space, the Kresge Business Library at the Ross School of Business will cease being a full-service library in the traditional sense. This year, we are transitioning into a service unit with little more space than is needed to house the librarians and staff. Using these challenges, the presenter will share accounts of how the reduction and elimination of library space did not also lead to the elimination of core library services coming from that group.

Among the topics to be discussed are measuring outcomes and student satisfaction, providing expanded reference services and embedded librarian programs, as well as the adoption of new services that saved positions at Kresge. The presenter will showcase how you can move from a physical library to an ethereal one, while retaining services, people and your connection to the school.

Speakers
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Steve Alleman

Head of Collections, University of Missouri - Kansas City
avatar for Annette Day

Annette Day

Director of Collections, Acquisitions and Discovery, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
avatar for Stacey Marien

Stacey Marien

Acquisitions Librarian, American University
Shelf Ready, ebooks. Gardening, cooking!
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan, Ross School of Business
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction project in 2016. Corey has been director since October 2006 and previously worked as the Associate Dean for Resource and Systems Management at the... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Speaking Our Piece: Librarians and Publishers on Their Relationship in the STM Market
Libraries and publishers have a long history of tense relations. Yet they are entwined and interdependent. Is it a tug-of-war or a "zero-sum game" as one writer in the 1990s described it? Or do publishers and librarians support each other? Can we get along? What power does each group have in the market not just as organizations but as individuals? How have recent development such as Open Access and new sales models affected the market relations? These questions prompted me to conduct interviews, including many during the past two Charleston Conferences, with the librarians in acquisitions and collection development and publishing representatives in sales and market development who are on the frontlines of the relationships between the organizations that they represent. These one-on-one interviews focused on the STM information marketplace and academic libraries. More than twenty-five people from publishing and libraries shared what makes negotiations successful on each side, strategies for working together and strategies for getting the best for their organizations. They reflected on recent changes in the market and how libraries and publishers can change the market. I will present my initial analysis of their frank comments on power dynamics and sage advice for effective relationships. There will be time for the audience to respond to my findings and to provide insight on future directions for my research.

Speakers
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M. Kathleen Kern

Librarian, University of Illinois


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

The Devil is in the Details: Managing the Growth of Streaming Media in Library Collections
Focusing on the development of best practices for the management of streaming video collections at Columbia & Cornell University Libraries, where streaming collections continue to rapidly expand. As these collections develop, the practices and policies put in place are put to the test. Are they effective? Come find out.

Speakers from Columbia University & Cornell University Libraries will present the issues encountered in managing expanding streaming video collections. Issues addressed will cover the life of the streaming content: ordering & acquisitions, licensing, putting links & records in library catalogs & course pages, digital encoding, hosting digital content, and tracking all of this information effectively.

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Koennecke

Jesse Koennecke

Director, Acquisitions & E-Resource Licensing Services, Cornell University
Ask me about Battledecks@ER&L!
avatar for Susan Marcin

Susan Marcin

Head of E-Resources Management: Technologies & User Experience, Columbia University
Susan Marcin is the Head of E-Resources Management: Technologies & User Experience for Columbia University Libraries, where her work focuses on electronic resources acquisitions, access, and services.  She holds a BA from Trinity College in Hartford, CT, an MSLS from Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and an MBA from Fairfield University in Fairfield, CT.
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Matthew Pavlick

Head, Monographs Acquisitions Services, Columbia University Libraries


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

The Future of Reading and Academic Libraries
The rise of the ebook is raising fundamental questions around the dynamics and habits of reading, and a perennial question - the importance of books in the academic library. Print and digital texts foster different styles of reading and different ways of thinking and of doing research. There are major cultural implications of the ubiquity of e-reading. Is it important to maintain hybrid collections that support the full range of reading and learning styles? What should be the role of librarians in addressing the complex realities of reading in a society deluged with information and multiple media 24/7? What does this mean for understanding print and digital cultures? This presentation will examine various implications of the shift from print to digital reading and how academic libraries in particular should respond.

Speakers
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David Durant

Federal Documents and Social Sciences Librarian, East Carolina University
My professional interests focus on the importance of preserving and ensuring access to legacy print collections in the digital library environment. This is an especially pressing issue in federal documents, where my institution is a member of the ASERL Collaborative Federal Documents Program, but also for broader monographic collections as well. I'm also interested in the ways in which technology is altering the ways in which we read and think... Read More →
avatar for Tony Horava

Tony Horava

AUL Collections, University of Ottawa
I've been involved in Collections work for many years, and have seen remarkable transformations over the years. The challenges around ebooks, licensing, budgets, consortial strategies, new forms of knowledge and scholarly communications spring to mind. Reading in the digital age fascinates me - it is such a sea-change. The Charleston Conference is always energizing. I look forward to connecting with many people and hearing new ideas and... Read More →


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Using Analytic Tools to Help Improve Collection Strategy and Engage the Research Enterprise
As Outsell described in 2013, research analytics has taken on more importance for publishers, research offices and researchers, libraries, and funding bodies. Understanding an institution’s research performance, exploring new opportunities for collaboration, and benchmarking against other institutions has led to the development of different discovery tools for research institutions. Understanding how to effectively use these products has been an issue for some institutions, especially libraries. While there are different products in the marketplace, this presentation will describe for attendees how one product benefits three areas: publishers, research offices, and libraries. While focusing on Elsevier’s Scival products, the use cases presented are applicable to other products in the marketplace.

The first speaker, Jeff Voci, will provide a brief overview of the growth of the research analytics marketplace and how this data can help to improve a university’s ability to establish, execute, and evaluate institutional research strategy. He will present two brief case studies on how specific US research institutions have used these tools to improve results in the areas of decision-making, boosting collaboration, attracting investment, and optimizing expenditure investment. The second speaker will describe how Scival was implemented at Oregon Health and Science University. Rachel Dresbeck, a research development officer, will outline why research analytics are becoming more important on campus and how she partnered with their library in the early stages of the SciVal products, and how these tools have helped address problems such as identifying research strengths and driving strategic investments. The final speaker, Emily McElroy, will outline how libraries, especially at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, can use these research analytics tools in improving collections, programs, and services.

Speakers
RD

Rachel Dresbeck

Director, Academic & Research Development & Communication, Oregon Health & Science University
avatar for Emily McElroy

Emily McElroy

Director, University of Nebraska Medical Center Library, University of Nebraska
JV

Jeff Voci

Sales Director, Elsevier


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Vendor Negotiations - More Secrets
Academic Libraries spend $7 billion per year. $4 billion of this on acquisition of products & technology to serve users. Libraries deal with hundreds, even thousands of unique vendors every year. And budgets are generally flat or constricting. This session will be an update to the session from previous years with new information including an update to the Vendor Survey presented previously. We will examine some of the economic value components and motivations from the vendor side of the negotiation process and how those drivers impact negotiations. These include business models, license issues, and commercial financial considerations and cost components.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Dunie

Matt Dunie

President, Data-Planet
Matt Dunie has founded or co-founded three information and content application services companies (Insight Publications, RefWorks, and LabArchives), is an advisor to ThirdIron, and held numerous executive-level management positions and professional association board positions. His professional experience includes senior positions at Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA), Atlantic Media, and Thomson. He has been involved with leading industry and... Read More →
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President, Gruenberg Consulting
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is president of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years of experience as a senior sales executive in the information industry. His new book, “Buying and Selling Information: A Guide for Information Professionals and Salespeople to... Read More →
avatar for David Myers

David Myers

CEO, DMedia Associates
David Myers, President and CEO of DMedia Associates, Inc., is an Information Industry expert, with over 24 years experience specializing in Strategy, Sales, Licensing and Business Development. Throughout his career, he has drafted, negotiated and closed over 500 domestic and international licensing agreements with publishing partners, customers and distributors.


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Why Subscribe to eBooks?
With so many options, from firm order purchase to subscription to demand driven acquisition (and maybe even short-term loan...?), what makes subscription so attractive, especially for groups? Join this session to hear why MOBIUS chose subscription and how it is working out for them -- rewards, regrets, and challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Sharla Lair

Sharla Lair

Consortial Services & Training Coordinator, MOBIUS


Friday November 7, 2014 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:00pm

Charleston Renaissance Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

All tours are $20 per person.  Reservations may be made on tour website broadstreettours.com and will be confirmed by e-mail. Number of participants limited to 20.  Room permitting, reservations will be accepted the week of the conference.  Payment by cash or check will be collected at time of tour. (Please make checks to Carol Ezell-Gilson or Lee Ann Bain.) 

Tour will begin and end at Washington Park, on the northeast corner of Broad and Meeting.  (Washington Park is approximately 1 mile from the Francis Marion Hotel.) A minimum of 6 people needed for tour to go.  For more information or questions, call Carol (843) 478-8414 or Lee Ann (843) 822-5248.

Friday November 7, 2014 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Washington Park Northeast corner of Broad and Meeting Streets

3:00pm

Civil War/Slavery Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

All tours are $20 per person.  Reservations may be made on tour website broadstreettours.com and will be confirmed by e-mail. Number of participants limited to 20.  Room permitting, reservations will be accepted the week of the conference.  Payment by cash or check will be collected at time of tour. (Please make checks to Carol Ezell-Gilson or Lee Ann Bain.) 

Tour will begin and end at Washington Park, on the northeast corner of Broad and Meeting.  (Washington Park is approximately 1 mile from the Francis Marion Hotel.) A minimum of 6 people needed for tour to go.  For more information or questions, call Carol (843) 478-8414 or Lee Ann (843) 822-5248.

Friday November 7, 2014 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Washington Park Northeast corner of Broad and Meeting Streets

3:15pm

"Punctuality is the thief of time:” The Earnest Pursuit of Social Media in the Library
The way social media tools are selected and used in the library changes regularly in an evolving digital and social climate. The opportunities social media presents to the library community includes, but is not restricted to, user engagement, professional networking, informational exchange and increasing the discoverability of existing online resources at the library. With so many tools available, multiple uses and so many librarians making use of these tools in their library, Taylor & Francis is producing a White Paper that analyses the challenges and opportunities presented by social media as a communication tool in the library. The White Paper will consider its use in the library and how this differs by librarian job role. Our sample will be taken from academic librarians around the world, which may also allow us to examine differences by geographic location. The goal: to establish how librarians are currently using social media in their roles, the most useful social media tools and best applications for these tools in a library setting. The research paper will be based on findings from focus groups in the UK, US and India. In depth tele interviews with those who have researched the impact of social media tools in their library will also be conducted and tips and lessons learned from these detailed case studies will also feature to ensure this session is practical and informative for all attendees, with clear action points for implementation in their own library.

Following this, Maria Atilano from the Thomas G. Carpenter Library at University of North Florida will share a case study on creating a social media strategy that includes scheduling updates ahead of time to appeal to students throughout the semester, creating relationships with other on-campus clubs and organizations via social media, and using tools such as Hootsuite and TweetDeck to schedule posts and collect statistics. With clear action points for implementation in their own library, this will be a practical session for all attendees,. Finally results from an online survey that will be distributed globally will be shared to outline best positive outcomes of social media tools in the library, with a series of recommendations for maximum impact in the library. We would like to present the findings of this research at Charleston.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Atilano

Maria Atilano

Marketing and Outreach Librarian, University of North Florida
Maria Atilano is the Marketing and Outreach Librarian at the University of North Florida’s Thomas G. Carpenter Library in Jacksonville, Florida. Previously she held positions as Library Services Specialist in Public Services and Sr. Library Services Associate in Special Collections at UNF. She graduated with her MLIS from Florida State University in 2012. Her main professional interests include social media, web design, marketing, student... Read More →
avatar for Elyse Profera Waller

Elyse Profera Waller

Regional Sales Manager, Central U.S., Taylor & Francis Group
Elyse Profera Waller is the Regional Sales Manager for the Central United States for Taylor & Francis Group's e-Journals division. Elyse joined Taylor & Francis Group in July, 2012 as Associate Library Marketing Manager and migrated to the Americas e-Journals Sales team in October, 2014. Elyse has 10+ years of professional experience across marketing, customer relations, and sales within the scholarly information and software industries.


Friday November 7, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Auditorium, Science and Mathematics Building (Rm 129) 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Back in Control: Game-Changing Model for Collection Development

Is it really possible for libraries to maintain control of their content, spend less money in the process and provide open access to all?

For many years commercial publishers have controlled what and how content was published and the terms under which it was offered to libraries and their patrons.  As an example, in the area of special collections, publishers have long offered to digitize important collections held by libraries at no cost to the institution.  While the libraries receive back the digitized content, the digital rights remain with the publisher and the source library is restricted in what they can do with their own content. The collections become locked away forever behind expensive pay walls.  While expedient, this model does not always align with the mission of libraries to advance scholarship by preserving and providing wide access to content to all who are interested.   

The open access movement sprang to life in response to this and other commercial publishing models. The movement toward open access began with scholarly journals and has now pushed into monographs and special collections.  At the same time, crowd-funding has proven to be an effective model for pooling resources to bring worthy projects to life. 

Reveal Digital is combining the concepts of open-access and crowd-funding to create a sustainable model for broadening access to library special collections.   Yes, working together libraries can change the publishing paradigm and economically expand access to unique and valuable content!  

In this session, the founder of Reveal Digital, along with thought leaders representing faculty, academic libraries and archives, will explore why this and other models were developed, how they work and how your institution can meaningfully participate in the advancement scholarship.   


Moderators
avatar for Celeste Feather

Celeste Feather

Senior Director, Licensing & Partnerships, LYRASIS

Speakers
MK

Marc Kruman

Professor of History and Director of the Center for the Study of Citizenship, Wayne State University
LM

Laura Micham

Director of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, Duke University